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Sorted and scary


Guest Tony Smith

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Guest Tony Smith
I moved to France in 1982. Can anyone tell me why, in the UK., everyone now uses the word 'sorted' to describe when something has been arranged satifactorily or elucidated. 'Sorted out' used to be the favoured term. When did the changeover occurr? Also, 'shagging' is something dogs do in the road isn't it, so why am I now reading about humans doing it? When did you all stop 'making love'? O.K. - the language is evolving (or regressing more like)Funny then that the term 'camping car' isn't used in the U.K. instead of the cumbersome 'motorcaravan' which reminds me of the epoch of Bedford Dormobiles and Reliant Robins.
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Guest Derek Uzzell
I've also presumed "sorted" is a contraction of "sorted out". I think the usage is fairly recent and is probably 'Essex-lingo' - if anyone has a slang dictionary it should say. (Incidentally, I once saw a dictionary of Russian slang. This contained words so bizarrely offensive (invariably sexually-oriented) that they made even my usually unshockable eyes blink!) "Shagging" goes back at least 50 years - I used it constantly at school. Oddly, it's not in my Webster's dictionary that is not normally coy on word meanings. It now seems to be employed as a semi-acceptable alternative to the F-word and probably became trendy again following the "Spy who shagged me" film. "When did you all stop 'making love'?" - bit of an intrusive question surely for us older people? However, as you've asked, in my case I think the last time was October 23 1999 during a 24-hour power-cut in our area. I agree wholeheartedly with your distaste for "motorcaravan", nor do I like the diminutive "'van" (because it's confusing). I'm not keen on "motorhome" either and (for some unfathomable reason) I absolutely loathe it being shortened to "home". I have this theory that the words "motorcaravan" and "motorhome" have done serious past harm to the UK leisure industry, resulting in designs with 'caravan' build quality and services, and Victorian salon interiors. I'd opt for "camping-car" too, not least because its French abbreviation to "CC" is wonderfully compact and highly unlikely to cause confusion in English.
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Guest Tony Smith
Sorry to hear that you havn't got any regular shagging sorted Derek as I believe you'd put it these days in the U.K. Cultureless Britain is rather 'scary' to me. Here, in France there are 5 tv programmes each week on books where they thrash out the merits and demerits of the latest offerings. People are generally very literate and their is no glory to be had by expressing ones lack of culture as in Britain. 'Kasabian', the latest group 'a la mode' in the UK were in France for dates and promo recently. I cringed at their self satisfied phrases and primary school grimaces and posturing. The interviewer was obviously at a loss as to how to get a coherent phrase out of them. Full marks for the music, but keep your mouths shut please lads when you're not singing. I'll just use the term 'camping car' from now on then, perhaps it will catch on.
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Guest Tony Smith
No, Titeuf's for the 'ado's'! I enjoy reading french authors but never listen to french music willingly. Anyone who has been trapped in the queue at the cashdesk of a french supermarket while Johnny Halliday is on the tannoy (for example, but there are many others just as bad) will understand why.
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Guest Derek Uzzell
There you go - I'm quite fond of Johnny, whereas I think French TV is basically radio with pictures. I don't think Brits are particularly less "cultured" than the French, but they sure can drink a lot more beer!
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Guest Tony Smith
You're quite fond of Johnny. I bet you like Cliff too! You don't have to live in the same country as him though do you? Johnny Halliday is like Cliff Richard in cowboy boots, but without the melodies. I've seen British tourists fleeing supermarkets when his songs come over the tannoy! French T.V.is notoriously uninventive. The book programmes however, aren't at all boring - it all depends on whether you like reading. Brits not less cultured than the French? You obviously havn't heard the average British band member on tour trying to express himself! Brits drink to get drunk, the French drink to accompany a meal.
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Guest David Powell
Apparently 'loo' is an old name for a card games 'kitty' where the gambling money is put. Perhaps there is a connection to the American gambling dice game known as 'craps' or 'crap-shooting'? Just a thought! No offence meant.
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Guest David Powell
On a more serious note Roy, your question about 'loo'. The answer may lie in military camps where 'toilet block' = 'ablutions' shortened to ab-LOO-tions ? Just a passing thought.
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"Loo" The origins here are French and go back to the days of chamber pots and before public drains. The cry of the chambermaid as she flung her lord/lady's doing out of the window in the morning was "gardez l'eau" In commom usage this was changed through the years to "l'eau" whose pronunciation was changed to Loo. I think it is safe to say at this point it is time to "can it" before we all get flushed with success. Good luck Docted
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