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Bigger Wheel Ramps


Big Momma

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I have the usual yellow wheel ramps that are purchased from most Motorhome accessory shops. However, have discovered recently that I needed about another 1" height to get van level at front so that sink would drain. Are there any other wheel ramps that are a bit taller than the standard ones available or is it a case of a DIY job ?
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Do you mean that on level ground you can't get your van level, even by using the full length of your ramps?  If that is the case, it would seem your van has an unusually "nose down" stance, leading me to wonder if the front suspension is tired.  As a further thought, have you visited a weighbridge to check that the front axle load is within limits?  I know many vans do run a little nose down, but that is usually corrected well within the length of the standard ramps.
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My Hymer is front high, due I suppose to the tag axle, I always try to park facing uphill as this is the best position for it, I agree that the plastic ramps could be improved, I find that sometimes I need to be right at the top of them and its then easy to go an inch too far and come off them, whoever comes up with an improvement on the current ramps available will make a lot of money as will the manufacturer of a plastic washing up bowl shallow enough to fit in a Hymer sink and allow the wooden cover to fit properly. I know these shallow bowls are around as we currently have one but its getting near its sell by date and I can't find a replacement. *-) *-)
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Hi Big Momma, I always think it is a good idea to make your own to the spec: you require. If you make them out of timber and good quality ply wood they are nice and light not heavy like those plastic ones, plus you can cut hand holes in them for ease of placing and removing them. Screw them together with brass screws, paint the 'day-glow red' so every one can notice your handy work. Don't forget plywood, weight for weight is stronger than sheet steel. Just think how many extra bottles of wine you could carry by reducing the weight of your levelling chocks!!!!!!!!!!!!!I made the upright sides out of one inch thick timber then plywood top and bottom with thin strips for traction...........
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The large levelling ramps kontiki mentions are probably Milenco Quattro as featured on page 228 of MMM August 2009. A pair was said to cost about £40 (including a storage bag) and details can be found on:

 

http://www.milenco.co.uk/level-quattro-pair.html

 

The milenco website also provides a list of on-line retailers.

 

I'm tempted to get a set of these myself, though their sheer size is a mite off-putting when it comes to storing them tidily in my motorhome.

 

In the past I've done as Ranger suggests and constructed my own wooden ramps, but (because I invariably over-engineer) they've always ended up at least as heavy as equivalent size plastic ones. Their main advantage was that they were free as far the materials were concerned, though very definitely not free if I costed my time making them.

 

Regarding slow-draining basins, this irritation can sometimes be 'cured' just by putting extra water in the basin. If you are lucky, this ploy causes the waste-pipework leading from the basin to fill completely and a siphon effect to begin that, literally, sucks the water from the basin into the waste-tank. It can be hard on water usage, but may be preferable to fiddling about trying to fine-tune a motorhome's stance.

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Hi Big Momma- A simple diy job would entail some 1" plywood plank a bit wider than the ramp width and 6" longer than the ramp so the wheels drive onto that first. A couple of peg blocks screwed to the boards to locate in the hollow suports on the underside of the ramps keeps everything where it should be. Its surprising how these ramps can sink into grass and this way they will not. Also the extra 1" in hieght does make a big difference.
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i seen those milenco wheel ramps on a stall at the malvern show and he was selling a pair for £26 with a storage bag i would think he will be going to the shepton show as i have seen him many time at outdoor shows
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Brambles - 2009-08-20 10:38 AM

 

Some Fiamma ramps can be stacked. If you get a second set you stack them and get higher rise -- makes it a bit harder to drive up though but works.

 

I tried this on a previous van and stopped when I smelled the clutch burning 8o| A bit steep...

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Brian Kirby - 2009-08-19 9:22 PM

 

Do you mean that on level ground you can't get your van level, even by using the full length of your ramps?  If that is the case, it would seem your van has an unusually "nose down" stance, leading me to wonder if the front suspension is tired.  As a further thought, have you visited a weighbridge to check that the front axle load is within limits?  I know many vans do run a little nose down, but that is usually corrected well within the length of the standard ramps.

 

Brian, it was the ground that was not level, lower at the front than at the back (could only reverse in to pitch with front end facing out). My wheels right at top of yellow ramps and did not create any discomfort for normal living, just irritation as sink would not drain completely.

 

Many thanks to everyone for the suggestions, I will look for the black ones first as this may be the ideal solution. Will check measurements to ensure that I can still store in my side skirt locker, I currently have the height to stack 3 of the Fiamma yellow ones on top of each other so perhaps have enough height for two of the other type.

 

Failing that I will look at undertaking a DIY fix.

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Ralph - 2009-08-20 5:53 PM

 

Brambles - 2009-08-20 10:38 AM

 

Some Fiamma ramps can be stacked. If you get a second set you stack them and get higher rise -- makes it a bit harder to drive up though but works.

 

I tried this on a previous van and stopped when I smelled the clutch burning 8o| A bit steep...

 

Hi Ralph. If you were in reverse , then try 1st gear and going forward onto them - much easier, stacked or non stacked.

Jon.

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Just a tip on carrying i pinched from someone else. I've put some mesh between the runners on the bike rack. I then put the ramps on the mesh and bungee them on. Saves carrying them in the van or ouside locker saving space. They are very light so doen't affect the bike rack weight limit. You can padlock them on if woried about someone nicking them and they're easy to get to when you arrive on site.
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Big Momma - 2009-08-20 7:06 PM
Brian Kirby - 2009-08-19 9:22 PM Do you mean that on level ground you can't get your van level, even by using the full length of your ramps?  If that is the case, it would seem your van has an unusually "nose down" stance, leading me to wonder if the front suspension is tired.  As a further thought, have you visited a weighbridge to check that the front axle load is within limits?  I know many vans do run a little nose down, but that is usually corrected well within the length of the standard ramps.
Brian, it was the ground that was not level, lower at the front than at the back (could only reverse in to pitch with front end facing out). ..........

Ah!  Obvious, I know, but it is far easier to place the van across the slope, and then level it from one side, than from the front/rear.  Not always possible, of course, though a different pitch sometimes offers a way out.

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