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Bodywork damage


peter lambert

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OK, I did a silly thing and had an argument with an overhanging steel barrier. As a result, there is a small area on one corner of the roof of our motorhome that has been chipped to expose the glass fibre under the gel coat. The area is about 1 sq inch.

Has anyone got any ideas for a DIY repair, as it ought to be possible to do without resorting to the extortianate prices of the workshops?

 

Any help/advice would be gratefully received.

Thanks in advance.

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peter lambert - 2009-09-20 7:35 PM OK, I did a silly thing and had an argument with an overhanging steel barrier. As a result, there is a small area on one corner of the roof of our motorhome that has been chipped to expose the glass fibre under the gel coat. The area is about 1 sq inch. Has anyone got any ideas for a DIY repair, as it ought to be possible to do without resorting to the extortianate prices of the workshops? Any help/advice would be gratefully received. Thanks in advance.

Whilst I hope that someone can help you I'd like to take exception to your 'extortionate prices' quote.

It really is very unfair to the large number of honest businesses out there who would never dream of extorting money from anyone.

Dearer than a DIY job of course, but go to a reputable motorhome body shop and look at the cost of the workshop, the equipment needed, the high cost of advertising and the other costs such as the health and safety hoops etc. that they have to jump through and you may be able to understand why the costs are what they are.

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Funny how people can read different things in to postings isn't it. :-S When I read 'workshops' I was thinking of 'motorhome dealers workshops', rather than specialist body repair shops.

 

Peter, there was a discussion a sort while back (2-3 months ago I think?) about doing repairs to fibre glass etc. If you have a shuftie through the search facility you might be able to find it, try various words and go back no more than a year in the 'date field'. I'd do it myself for you but the search doesn't seem to like me! :-(

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I will give you some advice without resorting to abuse. If you feel confident clean the area and get youself some gel Coat repair paste and follow the instructions. Cover the repair when soft with cling film and smooth it over with a filler spreader and it will make it easier to finnish off when it's all hardened. In the meantime cover the damage to stop water wicking down the exposed glass fibres and causing blistering later on.
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Thanks Mel.

I tried the search facility before adding my posting, and it turned me down too!! I will try again tomorrow.

As for dealers and repairs, my local dealer said that for damage to a panel, they would normally change the whole panel when i spoke to them on the phone yesterday. Hence my reluctance to go to them, and try and fix it myself.

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RupertGS - 2009-09-20 8:03 PM
peter lambert - 2009-09-20 7:35 PM OK, I did a silly thing and had an argument with an overhanging steel barrier. As a result, there is a small area on one corner of the roof of our motorhome that has been chipped to expose the glass fibre under the gel coat. The area is about 1 sq inch. Has anyone got any ideas for a DIY repair, as it ought to be possible to do without resorting to the extortianate prices of the workshops? Any help/advice would be gratefully received. Thanks in advance.

Whilst I hope that someone can help you I'd like to take exception to your 'extortionate prices' quote.

It really is very unfair to the large number of honest businesses out there who would never dream of extorting money from anyone.

Dearer than a DIY job of course, but go to a reputable motorhome body shop and look at the cost of the workshop, the equipment needed, the high cost of advertising and the other costs such as the health and safety hoops etc. that they have to jump through and you may be able to understand why the costs are what they are.

I think you're a bit out of order there Rupert. Just because a workshop is honest doesn't mean that the prices are not extortionate. £60+ P/H seems pretty extortionate to me and I'm working. So it must be a fortune to someone on a fixed limited budget. If you can't help the poor bloke that's damaged his pride and joy please refrain from needlessly upsetting them. It's not nice. So chill out, smile and help if you can. You'll feel a lot better for it. :D
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peter - 2009-09-20 9:17 PM I will give you some advice without resorting to abuse. If you feel confident clean the area and get youself some gel Coat repair paste and follow the instructions. Cover the repair when soft with cling film and smooth it over with a filler spreader and it will make it easier to finnish off when it's all hardened. In the meantime cover the damage to stop water wicking down the exposed glass fibres and causing blistering later on.

If it's my post that you're refering to your response is far more abusive than mine!

I did not abuse him, but simply pointed out that, in my opinion, the use of the word 'extortionate' was unkind and unfair.

Your accusation of abuse is actually abuse in itself!

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peter - 2009-09-20 9:27 PM
RupertGS - 2009-09-20 8:03 PM
peter lambert - 2009-09-20 7:35 PM OK, I did a silly thing and had an argument with an overhanging steel barrier. As a result, there is a small area on one corner of the roof of our motorhome that has been chipped to expose the glass fibre under the gel coat. The area is about 1 sq inch. Has anyone got any ideas for a DIY repair, as it ought to be possible to do without resorting to the extortianate prices of the workshops? Any help/advice would be gratefully received. Thanks in advance.

Whilst I hope that someone can help you I'd like to take exception to your 'extortionate prices' quote.

It really is very unfair to the large number of honest businesses out there who would never dream of extorting money from anyone.

Dearer than a DIY job of course, but go to a reputable motorhome body shop and look at the cost of the workshop, the equipment needed, the high cost of advertising and the other costs such as the health and safety hoops etc. that they have to jump through and you may be able to understand why the costs are what they are.

I think you're a bit out of order there Rupert. Just because a workshop is honest doesn't mean that the prices are not extortionate. £60+ P/H seems pretty extortionate to me and I'm working. So it must be a fortune to someone on a fixed limited budget. If you can't help the poor bloke that's damaged his pride and joy please refrain from needlessly upsetting them. It's not nice. So chill out, smile and help if you can. You'll feel a lot better for it. :D

When I meet people or engage in a debate I like to give them the benefit of the doubt and assume that when they use a word, they understand its meaning.

To extort money from someone is a criminal act and to use the word 'extortionate' implies dishonest and shady dealing.

It could be of course that I am wrong to infer that you understand the words that you use and simply wield them in ignorance of their true meaning. If however you, or anyone else uses that word to tar the entire bodyshop industry, whilst knowing its true meaning, then it's unfair, unjust and libellous.

Finally, I'm actually a bit staggered that someone cannot work out why some industries have to charge £60 an hour and why that may actually be a most reasonable price. There's a huge difference between a one-man band coming to your house to fix your tap and a large bodyshop with thousands of pounds worth of buildings, equipment and possibly one extra person for every mechanic. Someone has to do the books, run the business and all the other jobs that need doing in today's bureaucratic age.

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peter lambert - 2009-09-20 7:35 PM

 

Has anyone got any ideas for a DIY repair, as it ought to be possible to do without resorting to the extortianate prices of the workshops?

 

Any help/advice would be gratefully received.

Thanks in advance.

 

To get back to the origional question.

 

There was a chap at the Peterboro show who was displaying some very complicated repaired panels, both alloy and GRP, the subsequent repair being invisible. I believe that he was just starting out as a franchise and did not cover all areas at the time but was happy to travel if there was more than one repair required, or for you to go to him. He also was advertising in MMM but I can't find the advert, Doh!

I believe he was called The Caravan Medic and the following may be the website, it has some before and after pics. and the display he had at Pboro. showed the various stages of repair and the result was as good as the pics. show. The cost was extremely reasonable in my view too, from less than £100.

See

 

http://www.caravanrepairs.net/index.html

 

Bas

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Guest JudgeMental

Well found Basil!

 

Have saved that one in my favorites :-D They are based in Reading so not to far if you need to go to them (for me anyway) Had one scrape this summer in Italy when I had to reverse around a tight bend and scraped the rear edge ....it looked bad at the time but you kinda get used to it! lol And once I got home and cleaned it all up you would hardly notice.

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RupertGS - 2009-09-20 9:39 PMWhen I meet people or engage in a debate I like to give them the benefit of the doubt and assume that when they use a word, they understand its meaning.

To extort money from someone is a criminal act and to use the word 'extortionate' implies dishonest and shady dealing.

It could be of course that I am wrong to infer that you understand the words that you use and simply wield them in ignorance of their true meaning. If however you, or anyone else uses that word to tar the entire bodyshop industry, whilst knowing its true meaning, then it's unfair, unjust and libellous.

Finally, I'm actually a bit staggered that someone cannot work out why some industries have to charge £60 an hour and why that may actually be a most reasonable price. There's a huge difference between a one-man band coming to your house to fix your tap and a large bodyshop with thousands of pounds worth of buildings, equipment and possibly one extra person for every mechanic. Someone has to do the books, run the business and all the other jobs that need doing in today's bureaucratic age.

Rupert, sometimes I think you give offence without even realising it - I assume it is not intended! Please re-read what you've put as if you were the recipient rather than the writer. :-|
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peter lambert - 2009-09-20 7:35 PM

 

OK, I did a silly thing and had an argument with an overhanging steel barrier. As a result, there is a small area on one corner of the roof of our motorhome that has been chipped to expose the glass fibre under the gel coat. The area is about 1 sq inch.

Has anyone got any ideas for a DIY repair, as it ought to be possible to do without resorting to the extortianate prices of the workshops?

 

Any help/advice would be gratefully received.

Thanks in advance.

 

Just needed to check the original post and yes Peter did ask for 'Help' and 'Advice'. I read this, as did a few other respondee's, as Peter wanting help and advice in relation to doing the repair. However, other's just seem to want to use any opportunity to start an argument, don't you just love this forum (!) Keeps me entertained :D

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Well, I gave him some good advice and it won't cost him more than about £6 and a bit of work. How's that. So much more useful than misinterpreting his original post as though he has a grudge against the entire repair industry, don't you think.
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peter - 2009-09-21 8:48 PM Well, I gave him some good advice and it won't cost him more than about £6 and a bit of work. How's that. So much more useful than misinterpreting his original post as though he has a grudge against the entire repair industry, don't you think.

I didn't misinterpret his post. Either he doesn't know what extortionate means, which is fair enough, or he does know and he would appear to have a grudge against the entire repair industry.

I just get fed up with this constant implication that every business is there to rip you off, that there are no honest traders and that their prices are 'extortionate'.

Even worse is people who simply cannot work out why even the best run businesses have to charge what may appear to be highish hourly rates in order to cover the myriad of expenses that they have.

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Mel B - 2009-09-21 6:02 PM
RupertGS - 2009-09-20 9:39 PM When I meet people or engage in a debate I like to give them the benefit of the doubt and assume that when they use a word, they understand its meaning.

To extort money from someone is a criminal act and to use the word 'extortionate' implies dishonest and shady dealing.

It could be of course that I am wrong to infer that you understand the words that you use and simply wield them in ignorance of their true meaning. If however you, or anyone else uses that word to tar the entire bodyshop industry, whilst knowing its true meaning, then it's unfair, unjust and libellous.

Finally, I'm actually a bit staggered that someone cannot work out why some industries have to charge £60 an hour and why that may actually be a most reasonable price. There's a huge difference between a one-man band coming to your house to fix your tap and a large bodyshop with thousands of pounds worth of buildings, equipment and possibly one extra person for every mechanic. Someone has to do the books, run the business and all the other jobs that need doing in today's bureaucratic age.

Rupert, sometimes I think you give offence without even realising it - I assume it is not intended! Please re-read what you've put as if you were the recipient rather than the writer. :-|

I've simply given up trying to understand your logic. Read this as though I'm the recipient - what does that mean exactly? I know exactly what I've written and stand by every word of it. If you don't like it that's tough.

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Derek Uzzell - 2009-09-22 8:34 AM RupertGS May I ask you to define what you perceive your role on this forum to be, please?

First of all I'm not conceited enough to think that I actually have a 'role' on this forum. I'm just someone who likes to learn and also to help. But, assuming that you think I should have a 'role' I'll try to answer your question.

I come to this forum to learn and to advise. If you read all the posts, as I'm sure you do, you'll know that, where there's something that I do know about, I'm happy to pass on advice. My recent comments about my Camos Dome come to mind as do my advice on fuel consumption being a relatively minor factor when choosing a 'van. I wouldn't claim to be one tenth as expert as you and others but there are areas where I have specific knowledge and I'm happy to pass it on.

I also feel that, as a businessman, I must occasionally defend business against the ill-informed and often libellous accusations that are often posted by the sort of person who wakes up every morning assuming that he's going to be ripped off by someone.

I hope that that answers your question.

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RupertGS - 2009-09-22 10:39 AM
Derek Uzzell - 2009-09-22 8:34 AM RupertGS May I ask you to define what you perceive your role on this forum to be, please?

First of all I'm not conceited enough to think that I actually have a 'role' on this forum. I'm just someone who likes to learn and also to help. But, assuming that you think I should have a 'role' I'll try to answer your question.

I come to this forum to learn and to advise. If you read all the posts, as I'm sure you do, you'll know that, where there's something that I do know about, I'm happy to pass on advice. My recent comments about my Camos Dome come to mind as do my advice on fuel consumption being a relatively minor factor when choosing a 'van. I wouldn't claim to be one tenth as expert as you and others but there are areas where I have specific knowledge and I'm happy to pass it on.

I also feel that, as a businessman, I must occasionally defend business against the ill-informed and often libellous accusations that are often posted by the sort of person who wakes up every morning assuming that he's going to be ripped off by someone.

I hope that that answers your question.

Good wind-up, Frank :D
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A few years a go i was foolish enough to come off my motorbike and damage the plastic fairing. Went to the local car bodyshop and they used fibreglass and plastic repairs. They did an excellent job, so don't think you have to go to a "specialist" repairer shop around a bit.
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JudgeMental - 2009-09-21 12:39 PM

 

Well found Basil!

 

Have saved that one in my favorites :-D They are based in Reading so not to far if you need to go to them (for me anyway) Had one scrape this summer in Italy when I had to reverse around a tight bend and scraped the rear edge ....it looked bad at the time but you kinda get used to it! lol And once I got home and cleaned it all up you would hardly notice.

Judge, we may not notice it, but i bet it catches your eye whenever you walk past the 'van. damn annoying isn't it. *-)

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Guest JudgeMental
J9withdogs - 2009-09-22 11:26 AM
RupertGS - 2009-09-22 10:39 AM
Derek Uzzell - 2009-09-22 8:34 AM RupertGS May I ask you to define what you perceive your role on this forum to be, please?

First of all I'm not conceited enough to think that I actually have a 'role' on this forum. I'm just someone who likes to learn and also to help. But, assuming that you think I should have a 'role' I'll try to answer your question.

I come to this forum to learn and to advise. If you read all the posts, as I'm sure you do, you'll know that, where there's something that I do know about, I'm happy to pass on advice. My recent comments about my Camos Dome come to mind as do my advice on fuel consumption being a relatively minor factor when choosing a 'van. I wouldn't claim to be one tenth as expert as you and others but there are areas where I have specific knowledge and I'm happy to pass it on.

I also feel that, as a businessman, I must occasionally defend business against the ill-informed and often libellous accusations that are often posted by the sort of person who wakes up every morning assuming that he's going to be ripped off by someone.

I hope that that answers your question.

Good wind-up, Frank :D
AH HAH! I thought I recognised the cantankerous and holier then thou platitudes..........Welcome back Frank you old Bu$$er!
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