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reverse polarity adaptor


monty the motorhome

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My home-made adaptor goes into the connector on the side of the 'van, not onto the bollard. Doing it this way you only need the one reversed lead, no matter what sort of connector is on the electric hook-up point.

 

My adaptor is wired so that the 'van end is correct and the other end has the reverse (it's only about a foot long overall).

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'Tis of no real importance, but this has been said before and I still don't understand why! 

You have a 25M (probably) mains hook up lead.  You may also have a 300mm continental two pin adaptor lead.  You add a 300mm reversed polarity lead with a male CEE connector one end and a female CEE connector the other end.  Three, quite different, non-interchangeable, leads in all.

Unless you habitually park within 300mm of feeder pillars, what is there to confuse?  I just ask, of course!

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spospe - 2010-02-27 5:08 PM

 

My home-made adaptor goes into the connector on the side of the 'van, not onto the bollard. Doing it this way you only need the one reversed lead, no matter what sort of connector is on the electric hook-up point.

 

My adaptor is wired so that the 'van end is correct and the other end has the reverse (it's only about a foot long overall).

 

I made mine a little bit longer so that the connector can go under the 'van, out of the rain.

 

Mike

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SBS - 2010-02-28 8:50 AM  I made mine a little bit longer so that the connector can go under the 'van, out of the rain. Mike

This is not necessarily wise.  Used as designed, the connectors will resist even heavy rain.  They will not resist  being partially or completely submerged, as may happen, even on hardstandings, if the ground becomes waterlogged and puddles develop.  A short lead, leaving the connectors suspended above ground, even if they get wet in rain, would generally be safer.

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David Dwight - 2010-02-28 2:29 PM

 

In France and Switzerland you can get covers for the joining of two cables, unfortunatly english connecters are a tad to big for them.

 

David

 

Ah but why waste money when an old washing up liquid bottle with the bottom cut off and sealed with silicone at the top, a light smear of washing up liquid or similar before filling the small opening with silicone allows you to slide the bottle up and down at will but seems to remain water tight and for added tightness a thick cable tie around the bottle neck allows you to place more tension if required.

Works for me, though I used an old battery water bottle!

 

Bas

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Brian Kirby - 2010-02-27 5:53 PM

'Tis of no real importance, but this has been said before and I still don't understand why! 

You have a 25M (probably) mains hook up lead.  You may also have a 300mm continental two pin adaptor lead.  You add a 300mm reversed polarity lead with a male CEE connector one end and a female CEE connector the other end.  Three, quite different, non-interchangeable, leads in all.

Unless you habitually park within 300mm of feeder pillars, what is there to confuse?  I just ask, of course!

Brian, I do not understand your difficulty with this method, it is what I use and it does give the maximum flexibility.1) 25 metre mains lead with CEE connectors for 'normal' connection to mains at sites using the modern CEE bollards.2) 'Continental' type connector lead to convert between 25 metre lead with CEE connectors and continental bollard.3) Reversed lead to correct for polarity problems on either CEE or continental equipped bollards.This seems to me the simplest way of dealing with all common variations of the mains connection problem(s).Am I missing your point?
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spospe - 2010-03-01 3:13 PM
Brian Kirby - 2010-02-27 5:53 PM

'Tis of no real importance, but this has been said before and I still don't understand why! 

You have a 25M (probably) mains hook up lead.  You may also have a 300mm continental two pin adaptor lead.  You add a 300mm reversed polarity lead with a male CEE connector one end and a female CEE connector the other end.  Three, quite different, non-interchangeable, leads in all.

Unless you habitually park within 300mm of feeder pillars, what is there to confuse?  I just ask, of course!

Brian, I do not understand your difficulty with this method, it is what I use and it does give the maximum flexibility. 1) 25 metre mains lead with CEE connectors for 'normal' connection to mains at sites using the modern CEE bollards. 2) 'Continental' type connector lead to convert between 25 metre lead with CEE connectors and continental bollard. 3) Reversed lead to correct for polarity problems on either CEE or continental equipped bollards. This seems to me the simplest way of dealing with all common variations of the mains connection problem(s). Am I missing your point?

Yep, but it's my fault!  My comment was intended to be read against the post immediately above it, which recommended labelling the reverse polarity lead.  It was the suggested need to label I was querying.  Apologies for the confusion.

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I believe advice about labelling reverse-polarity adapters stems from when people do the polarity-reversing at the 230V-bollard end of the hook-up cable. When camping on the Continent, that method, of course, will require a reversed 2-pin adapter as well as a 'right-way round' one.

 

I'm sure that's how I was led to believe it should be done when I started motorcaravanning in 1998 and knew no better. If I had thought about it logically, I wouldn't now have two 2-pin Continental adapters in my Big Bag of Handy EHU Bits!!

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Derek Uzzell - 2010-03-01 6:46 PM

 

I believe advice about labelling reverse-polarity adapters stems from when people do the polarity-reversing at the 230V-bollard end of the hook-up cable. When camping on the Continent, that method, of course, will require a reversed 2-pin adapter as well as a 'right-way round' one.

 

I'm sure that's how I was led to believe it should be done when I started motorcaravanning in 1998 and knew no better. If I had thought about it logically, I wouldn't now have two 2-pin Continental adapters in my Big Bag of Handy EHU Bits!!

 

 

Precisely Derek.

( I thought it was obvious - obviously it was not !)

 

;-)

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malc d - 2010-03-01 8:51 PM

 

Derek Uzzell - 2010-03-01 6:46 PM

 

I believe advice about labelling reverse-polarity adapters stems from when people do the polarity-reversing at the 230V-bollard end of the hook-up cable. When camping on the Continent, that method, of course, will require a reversed 2-pin adapter as well as a 'right-way round' one.

 

I'm sure that's how I was led to believe it should be done when I started motorcaravanning in 1998 and knew no better. If I had thought about it logically, I wouldn't now have two 2-pin Continental adapters in my Big Bag of Handy EHU Bits!!

 

 

Precisely Derek.

( I thought it was obvious - obviously it was not !)

 

;-)

 

If you've got 2 visually identical Continental 2-pin-plug adapters, but one has its internal wiring 'polarity reversed', then obviously it's sensible to mark one of them appropriately so they can easily be told apart.

 

If you've just got a single CEE/CEE reversed-polarity adapter that goes between the hook-up cable and the motorhome's 230V input point, then (as Brian points out) there's no real need to mark that adapter.

 

Of course, Brian has overlooked (or diplomatically chosen to ignore) the fact that many motorcaravanners are getting on in years and their memory may not be as keen as in their days of golden youth. So perhaps it would still be a good idea to mark the CEE/CEE adapter "REVERSED POLARITY" as a convenient reminder of its purpose. ;-) ;-)

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'Twas neither spite nor diplomacy, I afraid to say, just that I had never realised folk travelled with reversed two pin adaptors.  I guess there are two reasons for that.  First, by applying the same logic, you'd also need to travel with two mains cables, one being reversed, to cope with the quite common reversed polarity on CEE feeder pillar sockets and second, because the way most of the two pin adaptors are designed, plugging them in upside down reverses polarity, with no further intervention required.  So, it simply hadn't occurred to me as a worthwhile adaptor to have.  Hence the question.  Funny, that!  :-)
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Brian Kirby - 2010-03-02 5:37 PM

 

'Twas neither spite nor diplomacy, I afraid to say, just that I had never realised folk travelled with reversed two pin adaptors.  I guess there are two reasons for that.  First, by applying the same logic, you'd also need to travel with two mains cables, one being reversed, to cope with the quite common reversed polarity on CEE feeder pillar sockets and second, because the way most of the two pin adaptors are designed, plugging them in upside down reverses polarity, with no further intervention required.  So, it simply hadn't occurred to me as a worthwhile adaptor to have.  Hence the question.  Funny, that!  :-)

 

 

 

Presumably you have not read John Wickershams' excellent Motorcaravan Manual then Brian.

 

I quote:

 

" .... some owners create their own polarity changeover device, and perhaps the best solution is to intentionally wire up a second continental adaptor with reversed connections "

 

 

It is indeed "funny" ( i.e. surprising) that you have not realised that people have followed this advice, and travelled with two adaptors.

 

 

 

:-|

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Brian

 

Plugging in a two-pin connector upside down does indeed reverse the 'live' and 'neutral' and obviates the need for a reversed lead.

 

The problem with this method is that when you meet an incorrectly wired CEE bollard you would be stuck, hence the need for a reversed, short length of cable with CEE connectors.

 

Just to be pedantic, there is no such thing as 'reversed polarity' for AC systems, reversed live and neutral, yes, reversed polarity, no. ;-)

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malc d - 2010-03-02 5:55 PM  Presumably you have not read John Wickersham's' excellent Motorcaravan Manual then Brian. I quote: ..... It is indeed "funny" ( i.e. surprising) that you have not realised that people have followed this advice, and travelled with two adaptors. :-|

Well, no, I haven't read Wicki's book, so perhaps it is not so odd I was unaware of his (to me) odd suggestion.

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Brian Kirby - 2010-03-02 5:37 PM

 

plugging them in upside down reverses polarity, with no further intervention required. 

 

Not with the French sockets I have come across - they have an earth pin, off center in the socket part, so it would be impossible to put the plug in upside down. Possible in Spain though.....

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malc d - 2010-03-02 5:55 PM

 

Brian Kirby - 2010-03-02 5:37 PM

 

'Twas neither spite nor diplomacy, I afraid to say, just that I had never realised folk travelled with reversed two pin adaptors.  I guess there are two reasons for that.  First, by applying the same logic, you'd also need to travel with two mains cables, one being reversed, to cope with the quite common reversed polarity on CEE feeder pillar sockets and second, because the way most of the two pin adaptors are designed, plugging them in upside down reverses polarity, with no further intervention required.  So, it simply hadn't occurred to me as a worthwhile adaptor to have.  Hence the question.  Funny, that!  :-)

 

 

 

Presumably you have not read John Wickershams' excellent Motorcaravan Manual then Brian.

 

I quote:

 

" .... some owners create their own polarity changeover device, and perhaps the best solution is to intentionally wire up a second continental adaptor with reversed connections "

 

 

It is indeed "funny" ( i.e. surprising) that you have not realised that people have followed this advice, and travelled with two adaptors.

 

:-|

 

That undoubtedly explains where I got the idea from, as I won a copy of JW's book for a letter of mine that was printed in Which Motorcaravan (and I still haven't forgotten - or forgiven - the trouble I had getting them to send me my 'prize').

 

As I think I've mentioned before, I bought two 2-pin Continental adapters from Marquis Tewkesbury, happily swapped over the live and neutral cables in one of them and then found the cables in that adapter had already been 'back to front'.

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spospe - 2010-03-02 5:57 PM Brian 1 Plugging in a two-pin connector upside down does indeed reverse the 'live' and 'neutral' and obviates the need for a reversed lead. 2 The problem with this method is that when you meet an incorrectly wired CEE bollard you would be stuck, hence the need for a reversed, short length of cable with CEE connectors. 3 Just to be pedantic, there is no such thing as 'reversed polarity' for AC systems, reversed live and neutral, yes, reversed polarity, no. ;-)

1 True, but it is only really a safe work around if the cable exits the plug horizontally, which many do not.

2 Which is why I commented the same logic would lead one to carry two mains leads, one reversed.  (Yes, I know the alternative of a short mains lead with CEE plug one end and CEE socket the other, wired to reverse polarity (or whatever word you prefer!), is far simpler - but if you have reached that point of reasoning, you'd hardly add the reversed two pin plug as well, now would you?  :-))  This is where I came in!

3  No, I wouldn't call that pedantic.  However, plugs usually have + and - symbols against the relevant terminals and, rightly or not, folk more often seem to recognise these as positive and negative, than as live and neutral, so I just use the terms I think will best be understood.  But don't let that put you off, I enjoy a good (correct) pedant!  :-D

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neilmac - 2010-03-02 6:26 PM Not with the French sockets I have come across - they have an earth pin, off center in the socket part, so it would be impossible to put the plug in upside down. Possible in Spain though.....
  Dead right, and I've even pointed this out myself!  Blast!  I yield!  :-D
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