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Dometic motorhome fridge


BobK

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My fridge has stopped working on 240v but still works on gas and 12v. Suspect the 240v heating element. Has any one changed them..trouble being I haven't an exploded diagram and not sure where it is located or what it looks like! I hope to be able to replace it through the external vents in the motorhome wall without taking the fridge out.

 

Any ideas

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Posted: 28 August 2010 3:01 PM

Subject: Dometic Fridge wiring.

 

For the second time on different vans I have discovered that the mains and 12v wiring is connected behind the lower vent grille and all that is used to connect the cables on the fridge to the two supply sources is a cheap and simple screw block terminal - which is then left uncovered and open to all the van washing hose water and rain and road dirt that can be thrown until the inevitable occurs and it corrodes and ceases to connect.

 

It is simplicity itself to replace - but only if you EXACTLY what to do!

 

I don't know what would happen if you crossed the 12v DC and 240v AC wires - and neither do I wish to know.

 

What I do know is that rewiring it has twice solved the intermittent problems of the igniter working when the fridge was alight and of it sometimes not working at all on gas. Dunno about mains - never use it!

 

So if your fridge does unexpected things look at the connector block first!

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Which model of fridge/freezer do you have?

With the RM 7*** series proceed as follows.

Remove the lower outside grill to get access to the wiring. The connection from the heating element to the wiring is usually covered with black rubber sheathing. (looks a bit like a cycle inner tube) You should be able to feel the connection inside this sheathing.

Remove the sheathing and connect a multi meter to the connections. With the mains turned on you should get a reading of 230/240 volts on the meter. Be careful not to short anything out. If you get a reading then the problem is the heating element. No reading then the problem is elsewhere.

 

New elements are around £45.00

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Whilst we are on the subject....

 

My Dometic RM7855 works on Gas & 230v but not 12V.

 

It did work on 12V until a company installed a Camos satellite unit and took the 12V feed off the top of the fidge/freezer.

 

I've had a quick look and there are two (thicker) white wires coming out of the top of the freezer cover..........one is now not connected to anything.

 

Where should it go ?

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Hi, Heyloft. There are normally two 12 volt supplies to the fridge, one from the leisure battery system, for the internal fridge lamp, and the gas igniter, and one that feeds the 12 volts to the 12 volt heater element, but only when the engine is running. I Presume they have connected the sat system to the leisure 12 volt feed, but somehow disconnected the 12 volt supply to the heater. What you need do is with mains disconnected for safety sake, check the connections to the fridge for 12 volts, but only there when the engine is running, these are the connections for the fridge 12 volt heater.

Brian B.

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Heyloft - 2010-09-07 3:01 PM

 

 

It did work on 12V until a company installed a Camos satellite unit and took the 12V feed off the top of the fridge/freezer.

 

Heyloft,

 

If that is the case then why not take it back to the company that broke it and ask them to fix it? Simples!

 

Keith.

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While you have the fridge out, check the pilot light assembly for tightness/leaks. Mine worked loose and when I fired it up I literally fired up the back of the fridge. Managed to put it out by aiming the extinguisher through the vent but it was a close run thing! Very nervous now of running the thing on gas.
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Keithl - 2010-09-07 7:31 PM

 

 

Heyloft,

 

If that is the case then why not take it back to the company that broke it and ask them to fix it? Simples!

 

Keith.

 

 

I could, but I'd rather have the answer, I don't want anything else bu**ered up

 

 

Ps sorry for the delay in responding I am not receiving email alerts

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Thebishbus

 

Thanks for that.

 

I'll get my meter and check if that 'loose' wire gets 12v..ish only when the engine is running.

 

If it does, I've just got to work out where it goes !!

 

All of this wiring is above the fridge freezer connected to the choc block or to the back of the control panel. So it's not a case of pulling the fridge out.

 

I'll try and download a wiring schematic to help

 

 

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In my limited experience of these fridges - only about 40 years - the vast majority of fridge problems relate to either th gas or the power not getting to the right place.

 

This invariably boils down to a dirty or blocked gas jet or loose or corroded 12v or 240v wiring.

 

Fortunately both are cheaply and easily resolved!

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Whilst on the subject of fridges i am in Spain at the moment and my

fridge Electrolux RM6505 keeps refusing to work on mains electric. As this

is an AES type it should select mains first then gas. Works ok on gas. The manual states that the mains voltage must be at least 200volts, but on checking it reads 227volts so thats not the problem . Any ideas anybody.

By the way weather here has not been got for last 3 days , high winds, thunder storms and heavy rain.

Should add that it will run on mains for couple hours then drops out.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Further to my trouble with the fridge not running on mains, on speaking to

Electrolux they said that it will not work with the voltage below 230, i find this unusual as the site i was on in Spain the voltage was only 227. Does

this mean that AES fridges are not made to work abroad . Anybody know of a fix for this or could the fridge be converted to manual operation and would this solve the problem.

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UK LDV (Low Voltage Distribution) for electricity supply tolerance is 230 V +10% -6% (=216 to 253V) & much of Europe being 230 Volt +6% -10% (207 to 244V) others in the EU being the same as the UK.

 

So, I had believed that for products to be sold in the EU they need to meet these requirements otherwise the manufacturer would not meet CE marking regulations and therefore unable to market the product in the EU.

Apparently this is not the case.

"The UK Government is of the view that equipment placed on the market in the UK must be safe at the operating voltages which the equipment will find itself exposed. We remain concerned that the standards may be inadequate by not testing over the full voltage range. We have been informally made aware of appliances which have failed at the 230 V +10% limit - there are also allegations of appliances which have been found to be unsafe at 230 V -10%. But as none of these have been formally referred to Government there has been nothing to investigate. Others in industry are also concerned, though others are not.

It was agreed many years ago between the UK appointed Notified Bodies and the UK Government that UK Notified Bodies when assessing products would ensure that the product was safe for all supply voltages that an appliance was liable to be exposed to. The UK Government continues to expect Notified Bodies, when verifying a product, to assess the risks that may be present. The Government considers this to be a risk which should be taken into consideration.

We have been advised that this situation is well known by many major UK wholesalers/distributors/retailers and some will not handle products which have not been assessed against the full supply voltage range within the UK. Whereas the concern raised in this notice is with respect to safety alone their concern may additionally be with performance and fitness for purpose.

Standards & Technical Regulations Directorate

http://www.dti.gov.uk/strd"

source:- http://www.bis.gov.uk/files/file11548.pdf

 

I do find Mickt's information from Electrolux very confusing, as at 227V it is less than 1% below the 230V norm.

But then again we appear to be at the mercy of our Electricity suppliers, see below for extract from a thread on the The Institution of Engineering and Technology forum.

 

"I have a UPS which serves a PC so when the power fails the device keeps the PC running. This UPS also monitors the supply voltage and sounds an alarm if it steps outside certain tolerances. The alarm kept going off on a regular basis but I initially assumes it was faulty. The unit was indicating a peak voltage to the property of 267V!

 

Eventually I contacted our DNO, EON to try and get some additional tests done. They duly sent an engineer who's initial readings confirmed the voltage was on the high side reading 253V when he measured it at the meter. EON sent us a voltage analyser which was plugged into the mains for a week and then returned for analysis. We subsequently received a phone call from EON stating they had concerns about the voltage and would be taking various actions to resolve the issue.

 

The results from the analysis showed a voltage range to our property of 211 - 261V with an average over the period of 254V. This, as many of you will be aware, is outside the tolerance that EON accept which is 217 - 253V.

"I have a UPS which serves a PC so when the power fails the device keeps the PC running. This UPS also monitors the supply voltage and sounds an alarm if it steps outside certain tolerances. The alarm kept going off on a regular basis but I initially assumes it was faulty. The unit was indicating a peak voltage to the property of 267V!

 

Eventually I contacted our DNO, EON to try and get some additional tests done. They duly sent an engineer who's initial readings confirmed the voltage was on the high side reading 253V when he measured it at the meter. EON sent us a voltage analyser which was plugged into the mains for a week and then returned for analysis. We subsequently received a phone call from EON stating they had concerns about the voltage and would be taking various actions to resolve the issue.

 

The results from the analysis showed a voltage range to our property of 211 - 261V with an average over the period of 254V. This, as many of you will be aware, is outside the tolerance that EON accept which is 217 - 253V."

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I think you have been misinformed, and your fridge should work down to somewhere around 210V AC. It is, after all, only a simple heating element so, providing it has AC mains power, it should heat up.  As to AES fridges working abroad, yes of course they will.  They are made to accept the commonly available European power supplies, which I believe now centre around 220/230V, but I think will readily take 210/240V without problem.  After all, they are made "abroad", and Dometic is a pan-European company.  If you want to confirm this, look in your manual for where the rating plate is located, and then look at the rating plate.  Should tell all you need to know.
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