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Different world only 80 miles South.


deerhound

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Spent last week in motorhome at Brighouse Bay holiday park near Kirkcudbright. In Kirkcudbright there are no speedbumps, no cameras in your face every where you look, no visable police on beat, no police traffic cars sitting at every junction, no speed cameras, no traffic wardens, no pay and display car parks, no roundabouts, and I was amazed to find motorhomes parked in one of main car parks at harbour and was told they have been there for years, What a really nice place to be and see good old common sense applied, but as soon as I hit outskirts of Ayr on A713 Speedbumps, Speedcameras, 2 BMW police traffic cars with radar etc etc, back at home with door locked thinking of moving away from central belt. :'(
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deerhound - 2011-02-17 1:55 PM

 

Spent last week in motorhome at Brighouse Bay holiday park near Kirkcudbright. In Kirkcudbright there are no speedbumps, no cameras in your face every where you look, no visable police on beat, no police traffic cars sitting at every junction, no speed cameras, no traffic wardens, no pay and display car parks, no roundabouts, and I was amazed to find motorhomes parked in one of main car parks at harbour and was told they have been there for years, What a really nice place to be and see good old common sense applied, but as soon as I hit outskirts of Ayr on A713 Speedbumps, Speedcameras, 2 BMW police traffic cars with radar etc etc, back at home with door locked thinking of moving away from central belt. :'(

 

 

That's why there are no TV programmes about couples moving from the countryside into towns and cities for a better quality of life.

 

 

;-)

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I can fully appreciate your feelings on finding the ‘quieter and more peaceful life’. However, before getting too carried away please consider the picture as a whole.

 

Moving to the country from the hustle and bustle of a town full of traffic, noise and crime sounds wonderful but is it all it is cracked up to be? Yes, when you are of a younger age and fit then travelling distances to get supplies is not an issue but as you get on in years these things can be tiresome and may not eventually be possible. People often move to the Highlands and Islands of Scotland for the ‘freedom and peace’ but then complain because fuel is 10% dearer than the cities and the local shops have limited choice.

 

Living in the city, I can walk to the paper shop around the corner, get a bus into town and have numerous supermarkets all touting for my custom. There are more restaurants than I could ever visit along with cinemas and theatres etc. I can get to the local international airport in 20 minutes if I wish to fly away to the sun, or get a train anywhere at frequent times. Yes, it is not perfect but once you get to the wrong side of retirement it does make life much easier.

 

I agree there are few TV programmes showing people moving to the cities but that is typical TV closed eye vision as through the ages it has always been a movement from country to town that has been the norm. It just does not look as good on the small screen as showing some ‘wallies’ trying to buy a farm in the middle of nowhere to grow their own vegetables etc.

 

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Dave225

 

I can assure you that I am not getting carried away with the 'benefits' of living in the countryside, but I note that your examples of people moving out of town are the extremes.

I suspect that not many retire to the remote highlands or go self sufficient on a farm.

It's true that the 'norm' is for people to move from the country to the town, but that is to look for work when younger. Retired people are unlikely to do that.

 

There are some drawbacks in the country, such as less public transport and higher prices for fuel ( but that varies from 1 or 2 pence per litre to 10 or more pence, depending where you are).

 

My nearest (small) supermarkets (2) - doctors - dentists- chemists- paper shop- two or three restaurants - are all within 10 to 15 minutes walk so I don't need to use the car.

But I also have a number of footpaths and bridleways 5 or 10 minutes in the other direction.

 

The poster ( deerhound) mentions roundabouts and traffic lights. My nearest roundabouts and traffic lights are about six miles away.

 

I used to live on the edge of London so I am aware of the 'benefits' - but on the whole I prefer to live where I am.

 

Nothing wrong with cities for a quick visit, but I can't wait to get back home.

 

 

 

;-)

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Nothing wrong with cities for a quick visit, but I can't wait to get back home. ;-)

 

Oh, I have to agree.

The poor saps who still have to work for a living are perhaps forced to live near to 'civilisation'; the majority of 'older folks' are fortunate in that, having sacrificed our youth to the grind, are now able to reap the benefits of that and move to where the pace of life is slower.  Yes, there are drawbacks.  Instead of going to the theatre we socialise with friends for instance.  BUT, I can walk out of my back door and within 1/2 mile I am on the beautiful Pembrokeshire coastal path, IMO there is no more beautiful place to be.  We are in touch with nature and can live to the seasons. 

You can keep your traffic, polution, congestion, lack of greenery and the general hustle and bustle of the towns. 

 

 

 

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I think we have to possibly clarify our viewpoints. I do live in the city, but in an area where I can walk to the countryside as has been mentioned by others. What i like is having the choice of that or taking the bus (every 10 minutes and free) into the city for whatever I choose. I was commenting on the OP who mentioned Kirkcubright, which is extremely attractive, but in itself removed from centres of population. Some feel that is the attraction, my point was that with ever increasing age, having facilities on the doorstep were advantageous.

 

My definition of the countryside is a place where a car is probably essential and facilties are more restricted. I also know of families who have made the move, in part to allow the children space and freedom, but in time have regretted it as the same children have made life Hell as teenagers always complaining 'there is nothing to do' and 'all the mates are in town' etc etc. You cannot win I suppose

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