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Tips on filling your vehicles


Barney123

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Tips on filling your vehicles...

My line of work is in petroleum for about 31 years now, so here are some tricks to get more of your money’s worth for every litre.

Here at the Canvey Island Pipeline, where I work, we deliver about 4 million litres in a 24-hour period thru the pipeline.

One day is diesel; the next day is jet fuel, and petrol, LRP and Unleaded. We have 34-storage tanks here with a total capacity of 16,800,000 litres...

ONLY BUY OR FILL UP YOUR VEHICLE IN THE EARLY MORNING WHEN THE GROUND TEMPERATURE IS STILL COLD. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground, the denser the fuel, when it gets warmer petrol expands, so buying in the afternoon or in the evening...your litre is not exactly a litre.

In the petroleum business, the specific gravity and the temperature of the petrol, diesel and jet fuel, ethanol and other petroleum products play an important role. A 1 degree rise in temperature is a big deal for this business. But the service stations do not have temperature compensation at the pumps.

WHEN YOU’RE FILLING UP, DO NOT SQUEEZE THE TRIGGER OF THE NOZZLE TO A FAST MODE.

If you look, you will see that the trigger has three (3) stages: low, middle, and high. In slow mode, you should be pumping on low speed, thereby minimizing the vapours that are created, while you are pumping. All hoses at the pump have a vapour return. If you are pumping on the fast rate, some of the liquid that goes to your tank becomes vapour. Those vapours are being sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you’re getting less worth for your money.

ONE OF THE MOST IMPORANT TIPS IS TO FILL UP WHEN YOUR TANK IS HALF FULL.. The reason for this is, the more fuel you have in your tank, the less air occupying its empty space. Petrol evaporates faster than you can imagine. Petroleum storage tanks have an internal floating roof.. This roof serves as zero clearance between the petrol and the atmosphere, so it minimizes the evaporation.

Unlike service stations, here where I work, every truck that we load is temperature compensated, so that every litre is actually the exact amount.

ANOTHER REMINDER, IF THERE IS A FUEL TRUCK PUMPING INTO THE STORAGE TANKS, WHEN YOU STOP TO BUY, DO NOT FILL UP.. most likely the petrol/diesel is being stirred up as the fuel is being delivered, and you might pick up some of the dirt that normally settles on the bottom..

Hope, this will help you get the maximum value for your money.

 

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The OP ranks as one of the most 'copied and pasted' items in the world, the so called petroleum company employee's workplace is usualy (as in this case) changed to suit whichever country the post is made, so what does that tell you?

This has been investigated and whilst it is generaly admitted that there is possibly a small saving to be made for a couple of the claims, it is not quantifiable, and it would be wiped out on a large tank such as seen in vans being kept full, i.e. the tiny saving in fuel would e offset by the equaly small amount of interest that could be earned from investing the cost of 1/2 a tank.

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Hawcara - 2011-04-11 8:02 PM

 

Silly question, does this only apply to petrol or to diesel as well? B-)

 

Thank you

 

 

 

Neither.

 

It's an "old wives tale" that has been circulating around the internet for many years now.

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The OP's comments are valid.

 

Having worked on both a Oil Storage Depot & a Refinery, I am fully aware of the extent of the differential.

 

The fuel (Petrol, Diesel, Kersene, Heating Oil, Gas Oil, etc., etc..) leaving the Refinery is HOT & a receiving Tank existing product can be much cooler, When calculating the new volumes in a Storage Tank there is a specific formula, which measures the volume (Litres), SG & temperature of the existing product. SG changes with temperature & the mean point is 15degC. As Temperature increases Volume increases also. Likewise as Temperature decreases so does Volume, So the lower the temperature the more dense the product.

 

The Refinery measure the same for the "export" product.

When transfer has finished the receiving Storage Depot Tank is again dipped, sampled & temperature measured.. (Service Station Tanks are only dipped & the Pumps only measure Volume)

The received volume decreases as the incoming product is cooled by the "resident" product. This is substantial in winter conditions as HOT delivered product cools rapidly when pumped into a cold Tank/Product.

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Old wives tale or not, it certainly applies to LPG, as I found out at, what could have been my cost.I had fitted two 11kg Gaslow cylinders to my previous MH. I filled them up locally, drove down to Portsmouth, crossed to Santander , left boat, no problems. Drove halfway down Spain that day, stopped at camp site about 5pm. Started to set up for the evening, my wife said strong smell of gas at side of van !!!! she was right, I opened the gas locker, panic!!! gas hissing like mad, but both cylindes turned off. Phoned Gaslow , explained the situation, they said cylinders must have overfilled, can happen first time, Going into the heat of Spain the gas must have expanded and was leaking out of the safety valves.I had to carefully disconnect the cylinders,and blast gas off untill it ran clear, phew,panic over. 8-) 8-)

Brian B.

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by no means an expert on this saga.

 

but i can remember in very hot heave ways in the 70's drivers were told not to over fill their tanks as the petrol expands in the heat, saw several cars in central london that did this and had petrol dripping from their tanks were they had overfilled and the expanding petrol leaked out causing a fire risk and the LFB being called out to sand the spill.

 

only needed a hapless passing smoker to flip a dog end into the gutter by one of this leaking cars for a fire.

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I'm not saying that there is no truth in any aspect of the OP cut-and -paste.

 

What I am saying is that it's really an irrelevance.

 

 

 

 

If you wan't to save fuel. A lot of fuel. A gazillion times more fuel than all of the OP "secrets" put together:

 

Drive slower.

Keep your tyres at, or very slightly above, manufacturers recommendation.

Do less journeys.

Take your roof rack off.

 

 

 

 

 

I'll save you maybe 15% or more of ALL your petrol/diesel costs.

For very week of every year of the rest of your driving lifetime. That's a saving of tens of thousands of pounds.

And I'll do it right now:

 

1.Organise yourself to do one less 10 mile journey a week. Or a combination of really short trips that adds up to 10 miles each week. Forced yourself to walk to the shop/car share/use the pushbike...just once a week.

2.This is the REAL secret to saving fuel: train yourself to drive at 5 mph below the applicable speed limit for that stretch of road, as a matter of automatic course, all the time. Make it a training game to spot the road signs and do so. See if you can do it. Consistently. Make it a challenge for yourself.

 

 

You do that, and it'll be just as though the Government has reduced the price of petrol, just for you, by maybe 15%.

'Cos that's how much you'll be saving compared to what you're spending now.

 

 

 

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BGD - 2011-04-12 10:40 AM

 

I'm not saying that there is no truth in any aspect of the OP cut-and -paste.

 

What I am saying is that it's really an irrelevance.

 

If you wan't to save fuel. A lot of fuel. A gazillion times more fuel than all of the OP "secrets" put together:

 

Drive slower.

Keep your tyres at, or very slightly above, manufacturers recommendation.

Do less journeys.

Take your roof rack off.

 

I'll save you maybe 15% or more of ALL your petrol/diesel costs.

For very week of every year of the rest of your driving lifetime. That's a saving of tens of thousands of pounds.

And I'll do it right now:

 

1.Organise yourself to do one less 10 mile journey a week. Or a combination of really short trips that adds up to 10 miles each week. Forced yourself to walk to the shop/car share/use the pushbike...just once a week.

2.This is the REAL secret to saving fuel: train yourself to drive at 5 mph below the applicable speed limit for that stretch of road, as a matter of automatic course, all the time. Make it a training game to spot the road signs and do so. See if you can do it. Consistently. Make it a challenge for yourself.

 

 

You do that, and it'll be just as though the Government has reduced the price of petrol, just for you, by maybe 15%.

'Cos that's how much you'll be saving compared to what you're spending now.

 

 

 

Hear hear! I can't believe that anybody can be so petty as to consider deliberately filling up early in the morning on the chance that they may get half a pint more diesel! Or that they will always fill up when the tank is half full, rather than when it's much lower, thus having to go to the filling station twice as often as course, which will probably end up costing more.

 

In my short time learning by using forums I have come to realise that some people have an obsession with saving a few pence (although not all) but this latest wheeze takes the biscuit!

 

A broken biscuit of course, which you can buy much more cheaply than a fresh packet if you're prepared to shop a round a few grocery stores!!

 

As has been said, if you really want to save fuel, use a few common-sense measures as listed above.

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If you type "My line of work is in petroleum for about 31 years now" into your search engine then you'll find that there are dozens of web pages displaying the same information, most originating from California. Whether the information is correct I have no idea but it does seem suspicious that there are so many people claiming "My line of work is in petroleum for about 31 years now".
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