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Close Coupled Toilets.


vindiboy

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I am in the process of updating one of my shower rooms in my Bungalow and have been shopping around for fixtures, it is a few years since I have done any refurbs and things have changed, I notice that on the new fully enclosed toilet pans [Close coupled ] that it will be impossible to change or tighten a toilet seat on these as they are assembled before fitting and there is no way you can get to the seat nuts after fitting without removing the whole pan again it seems. One salesman recons that it can be done from above because the fitting works like a Rawl plug opening / closing on compression, if this is true it would be possible do do the change but if not it is a big job to remove a toilet pan bearing in mind that you will have tiled up to the pan both floor and wall, anyone any suggestions ???
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Yes that is the plan but would still have to break connections of water and soil to remove the pan retrospective, flexi fittings have been suggested so will look into these, it is possible to get a close coupled pan that leave the seat fittings exposed but these are not so streamlined as the other type and would require more cleaning. :-( :-(
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I've fitted a couple of close coupled toilets in recent years as replacements for older pans and as mentioned tiling the whole floor first and sitting the pan on the tiles is much easier and looks neater.

 

It can be a bit of a bu##er drilling through some tiles to fix the pan down though!

 

On both occasions the seat fixings are getatable with the whole lot in place so I would suggest buying a different one if the one you looked at is difficult!

 

The cold fill, overflow (if there is one?) and soil pipe will very likely all have to relocated anyway as Soddes Law being what it is nothing is ever in the right place so with a new stop valve at the connection turning the water off is easy enough when you need to and being a fairly new soil pipe fitting that too should separate easily if you need to.

 

If I can get a loo out in a matter of a few minutes with no s[ecial tools so should you be able to if you have to!

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pelmetman - 2011-11-06 8:41 AM

 

laimeduck - 2011-11-05 10:11 PMFor something different you may find something in this link: -Sent to me by a friend in Germany :D :D :D http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/gdemanitou-1148518-toiletten-der-welt-kopie/
(lol)(lol)............I expect the designers felt flushed with sucess:D....

You're up early Dave, going to church?

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Guest pelmetman
knight of the road - 2011-11-06 8:45 AM
pelmetman - 2011-11-06 8:41 AM
laimeduck - 2011-11-05 10:11 PMFor something different you may find something in this link: -Sent to me by a friend in Germany :D :D :D http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/gdemanitou-1148518-toiletten-der-welt-kopie/
(lol)(lol)............I expect the designers felt flushed with sucess:D....
You're up early Dave, going to church?
I've already been Malcolm:D...............do you want any lead?(lol)
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Well the toilet I have bought doesn't appear to have any holes in it to screw it to the floor [ B n Q ] there are two holes in the base but they go in horizontally , not as you would expect them to be angled to take screws, there is a bung to fill the holes though, There were no techies in the store when I ordered it so could not get full info, I expect there will be instructions in the box, fingers crossed, I looked at the flexible fittings available today whilst in store, amazing what is available now, seems to make the job so much easier.So we shall see , all I need now is the inspiration to get started stripping the old kit out, got a couple of weeks beer sipping and planning as we have to wait for the shower trays and surrounds to arrive , thanks to all for your input, Malc.
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It it don't screw down there may be a bracket that fixes to the floor to hold it in place?

 

Alternatively you can bed it on a good dollop of tile cement - but if you do I doubt it will come out in one piece!

 

If you bed it on silicone you can at least cut around it with a stanley knife to release it should you need to!

 

It doesn't do to get too bogged down!

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It always amazes me but the Germans have toilets where what has just passed through you remains on a ledge and is only removed when you flush. Apparently some of the health freaks among them like to examine what they have just passed. Sounds odd but when one thinks about it it is prober ably a good idea I suppose.
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Malc, having recently replaced our bathroom suite the following comes to mind:

 

1) Ensure that the spongy type seal which goes between the pan and cistern is sited and tightened properly - we had a problem with ours, which was an ex-display model and already assembled, as the seal had been put in wrongly and leaked ... toilet ended up having to be taken out twice to rectify it!!! (Hubby had supposedly check it ....!)

 

2) Make sure the push down flush buttons are put in 'straight' as you usually secure the plastic inner parts in place with a plastic nut type clamp under cistern base, once you've assembled the loo you can't alter it to straighten it up as the nut sits in the top of the rear of the pan ... we found this out the hard way ... toilet out again! (Hubby had supposedly checked this too and nearly got murdered!).

 

3) There will be a bracket to attach to the floor for the loo pan to line up with, into which there will be screws/bolts to put through the pan to tighten into the bracket - instead of drilling to fasten the bracket to the floor, I'd use some silicon again and bed the pan on silicon too, much easier and you'd really have to try hard to get it to fall over!!!

 

4) Modern toilets don't normally have a separate overflow pipe now as it drains into the toilet pan. For the water inlet, use a flexi pipe - much, much easier than trying to pratt around getting other piping to the right length - you can get white ones so they blend in (unless of course you're going retro and having an avocado coloured suite!).

 

5) To fix the pan to the wall, I used silicon again as I'd wood pannelled the wall and didn't want to have to drill through the panelling and risk damaging it ... as it turned out this was a good decision as we have a cavity wall behind the toilet so would've had to use cavity wall fixings which, with us having to remove the toilet again and again, we'd have got through loads of them!!!! *-)

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vindiboy - 2011-11-06 12:43 PM

 

Well the toilet I have bought doesn't appear to have any holes in it to screw it to the floor [ B n Q ] there are two holes in the base but they go in horizontally , not as you would expect them to be angled to take screws, there is a bung to fill the holes though,

 

Standard fitment, you will find two plastic angle brakets, these screw to floor you then use screws with plastic washers to screw pan to bracket then fit 'covers' to screws. The trick is to get the brakets spaced to correct width or the pan to always be loose.

Not sure about seat fixings, the three I've fitted all have seats that are fitted afterwards. On two of these the 'cup' that holds flush buttons failed, in end I machined new ones from stainless bar.

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