Jump to content

Why don't we start a wine-lovers (bibbers?) thread?


Symbol Owner

Recommended Posts

No hidden agenda here folks! I am aware that some of us on here share a propensity for a bottle of the red stuff ( and/or rose/ white/sparkling/fortified/distilled grape products in my case!) -- sorry Malcom, to 'include you out' as Sam Goldwyn once (nearly) said!

Let's kick us off -- Clive recently reminded me of the joys of the Malbec grape, but, very reasonably, is declining to drink it at the moment, if it is of Argentinian origin. My 'wine of the week' for your delectation & delight,folks, is: 'La Patrie' Cahors -- on offer in my local Sainsbury for the 'knock-down' price of just £6.00.

Pure (French) Malbec -- delicious -- but as it is young (2010 -- but oaked) it needs decanting -- and not delicately either -- upside down with the bottle on one movement gurgling into the jug/decanter at speed -- then 5-6 hours -- if you can leave it that long -- an hour or two would do if that's all you've got -- will produce a sea-change -- soft and fruity, rounded & delicious! (sorry to 'bang on' about this - but it really does make a huge difference -- you try a drop of its (vinegary) young self before doing as I describe! -- the difference is amazing!)

Just an aside -- before I leave you all to 'chew over' this one -- isn't it strange how South American growers have successfully taken up grapes for red wine that the French/ Bordelais have (almost) discarded? Argentine Malbec being a case in point, as is Chilean Carmenere. Another one that springs to mind is the adoption of the Tannat grape (from south-west France) in Uruguay. The Chileans are also making a success of the Southern French 'wine-lake' grape, the Carignan.

 

So, see what you think of this week's recommendation! Apologies in advance to any of those of you, [like the late lord (alan) Clark] who professed not to touch anything that cost less than £100 (!) -- and this was some years ago!

 

 

Cheers! (hic!)

 

Colin.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest pelmetman

I like red wine normally from a box and fed intravenously.............it saves on the washing up.............and saves being embarrassed down the bottle bank.

 

Citie de europe now do 10 litre boxes ;-).............which is useful when you don't have much payload :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well done S.O. A subject we can slurrrrr over...

 

We are certainly Red wine lovers, and at the moment a fruity Spanish Merlot that we keep buying before it all goes! WHY, because we get it from Aldi at £2.99, serve slightly warm and enjoy.... It really is good and we have bought expensive wines before and this is as good... "Grapevine" but please don't tell anybody else !!!

 

Derek & Pauline

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks D.&P., just the sort of reply I was hoping for!

 

My nearest Aldi is 10 miles away -- but it might just be worth the cost of the fuel -- if I buy a case!

 

You don't have the same view on Merlot as was expressed in the film: 'Sideways' then! (lol)

 

Cheers,

 

Colin. ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish to state my total and unmitigating disgust at the starting of this very segregatist (?) thread ... which is clearly inciting others to undertake an activity that specifically excludes a minority of UK citizens ... >:-(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Namely ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

those of us who don't drink alcohol!!!! :D (lol)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We buy lots of very fine German wines which we go to France to buy and having some relations in the wine growing area of Germany we know what to buy. None of your Blue Nun, Black Tower etc rubbish. Happily the Germans produce some very fine wine but are not fashionable so are very reasonably priced. Just don't change the status quo by telling anyone!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mel B - 2012-03-21 6:44 PM

 

I wish to state my total and unmitigating disgust at the starting of this very segregatist (?) thread ... which is clearly inciting others to undertake an activity that specifically excludes a minority of UK citizens ... >:-(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Namely ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

those of us who don't drink alcohol!!!! :D (lol)

 

 

That's just typical, sober people ruining the enjoyment of us p155 heads. :D :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest peter
Mel B - 2012-03-21 6:44 PM

 

I wish to state my total and unmitigating disgust at the starting of this very segregatist (?) thread ... which is clearly inciting others to undertake an activity that specifically excludes a minority of UK citizens ... >:-(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Namely ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

those of us who don't drink alcohol!!!! :D (lol)

Are you a recovering alcaholic then Mel?. :D
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Colin Leake - 2012-03-21 6:47 PM

 

We buy lots of very fine German wines which we go to France to buy and having some relations in the wine growing area of Germany we know what to buy. None of your Blue Nun, Black Tower etc rubbish. Happily the Germans produce some very fine wine but are not fashionable so are very reasonably priced. Just don't change the status quo by telling anyone!

 

No, Colin, I won't -- German wine ( along with some 'New World' offerings) I avoid -- I first properly drunk wine in 1960, in Germany. I was 16 at the time. It gave me a taste for wine, but I can't drink their dreadfully sweet offerings now -- 'eiswein', in special circumstances, perhaps being an exception. Wine writers (perhaps in the pay of German producers? ;-) ) 'go on' dreadfully about the horrible Riesling grape -- but I am not a fan -- almost wherever it is grown. When we were in New Zealand I was persuaded, on a trip to a Malborough vineyard/winery to try some of theirs -- they ( almost ) made it palatable -- bet they don't export it though!

Each to his own -- more tips/suggestions please -- from fellow 'wine-buffs' out there -- not teetotallers!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest pelmetman
Symbol Owner - 2012-03-22 5:44 PM

 

It's what you usually have to pay for 'budget' wine of any quality these days Dave :'( thanks to successive Chancellors of the exchequer -- this one is no different -- just didn't add any little 'extras' this time!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

 

Currently quafing a excellent Chilean Merlot/Shiraz from the Co op.............£14.59 for 3 litres :D

 

And its fair trade so doing my bit for Johnny foreigner ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds good Dave -- too dangerous for me, these wine boxes -- I'd be tempted to quaff the lot very quickly indeed -- with no thought of the 'recommended daily limits' that SWMBO tries to keep me to!

I'm glad that your 'tightwad' tendencies don't stop you from enjoying the stuff!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest pelmetman
Symbol Owner - 2012-03-22 6:00 PM

 

Sounds good Dave -- too dangerous for me, these wine boxes -- I'd be tempted to quaff the lot very quickly indeed -- with no thought of the 'recommended daily limits' that SWMBO tries to keep me to!

I'm glad that your 'tightwad' tendencies don't stop you from enjoying the stuff!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

 

I always know when I've had enough Colin :D..................I fall over...Hic :D..................won't happen tonight though as we have just run out :-(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

peter - 2012-03-21 9:28 PM

 

Mel B - 2012-03-21 6:44 PM

 

I wish to state my total and unmitigating disgust at the starting of this very segregatist (?) thread ... which is clearly inciting others to undertake an activity that specifically excludes a minority of UK citizens ... >:-(

 

Namely ... those of us who don't drink alcohol!!!! :D (lol)

Are you a recovering alcaholic then Mel?. :D

 

You know, that's one of the first questions I'm asked when I tell anyone I don't drink ... *-)

 

I actually don't like the stuff - hard to believe I know! 8-) I was first put off it when I was a kid and was given a lemonade shandy ... yuk ... it tasted like the currant pie I'd been force-fed by the deputy headmistress at my primary school .... >:-(

 

I don't like currants, sultanas, or anything of the like, - I put it down to it being something to do with the taste of them which is similar to alcohol and why I don't like alcoholic drinks or food/chocs ... sherry trifle is horrible and I can tell immediately if something like lasagne has some wine in it. 8o|

 

I have drunk alcohol, but it is usually very, very well diluted with other things, such as sangria with lots of lemonade, even some Cognac (the one meant for the Americans) which was quite mild, again mixed with a lot of lemonade - hubby even got me a bottle of Southern Comfort (which I believe is similar) which spent 3 years in the cupboard before he snaffled it himself!!! :D

 

I am happier though without even the slightest alcohol taste so I don't partake at all now - much simpler and it means that one of us is always 'legal' for driving purposes when on holiday. When we come back off holiday I do bring back some bottles though ... hubby brings wine ... I bring demineralised water!!! (lol)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I probably ought to try to get to know some of the better German wines, I'm not being critical of your taste, Colin, it is probably because I haven't been introduced to the best, as you have!

I would like to try the one German red wine that I have heard of ( there may, of couse, be more that I haven't heard of) that is 'Spatzburgunder' made from the Pinot Noir grape -- my favourite of all the red wine grapes. Have you tried it Colin? Is it any good? I've heard some fairly'scruffy' reports about it -- but would still like to try it. I guess that it is fairly difficult to obtain in this country, like you say of the best German offerings!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course Michele, Champers is the king of wines in some people's opinion! I think that it is over-rated and too expensive! There are sparkling wines which are just as good as many champagnes, in my opinion -- have you tried sparkling Vouvray, or Coteaux de Limoux?

 

Cheers,

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Colin

 

I think you posted some time ago that you are wary of travelling abroad with your 'van, and the (understandable) reasons for doing so.

 

You were largely encoraged to try to overcome that, and you don't seem to be a "shrinking violet", so I'd reiterate that encouragement.

 

Now, wine may be one of the lower considerations for doing so, but as you seem to be an enthusiast, you really are missing out on an experience.

 

Germany, Austria and (if you're a bit more careful) even Switzerland definitely have something to offer - and you simply will not get the variety in the UK unless you shop (at a significant mark-up) at a specialist.

 

Pinot Noir is far from my favourite, but a decent German Spätburgunder or Blauburgunder can be had locally for somewhat less than your budget currently appears to be running at. (As in all things, some are better value than others, but half of the fun is in the finding them). Come to think of it, I've probably enjoyed the better German Pinots more than most others, but that may have something to do with the holiday atmosphere.

 

You can then run through a whole gamut of grapes you've probably not tried (or even heard of) before; Lemberger (Blaufränkisch), Dornfelder, Blauer Zweigelt........etc.

 

I'm not a great white wine fan myself, much preferring red, but a good dry Riesling (particularly German) takes a bit of beating in that category (though I do like a good Gewurtztraminer, and the Alsace offerings do trounce the German ones).

 

Müller-Thurgau has always seemed somewhat dull to me (though I spent a happy evening in a Vienna Weinkeller once, drinking "viertels" of it from a glass not at all unlike a half-pint dimpled/handled beer mug.

 

The psychological effect of this was that it went down at beer speed (and thus in beer quantities), and it was only on re-attaining street level at the end of the evening that realisation dawned that it was about three times the strength of beer. :-S

 

Yes, if you avoid the cheapest "plonk" and then buy to taste, German wine is well worth discovering.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No I have not ,but if I see it and can remember it I will.

 

Actually like Mel we are not drinkers also ..just the taste would rather have a cuppa but that does not mean that we do not have the occassional drop now and then.

Most of our stocking up comes in france usually just before we head for home and mostly its red wine for the beef bourginion (spellin ) anyway why we have two 56 bottle wines coolers I have no idea just because we could I suppose but they do take some filling .

We started off with the right hand cooler being for white and champers & the left is kept for red .

Anyway there is still red and a few whites left but on the whole its coke water orange and a few tins of different beers or ales just incase .

But I have now and again watching the cholestrol and BP taken a single glass of red with my fish dinner .

I have found merlot and shiraz to be very nice .

Years ago we decided that as we didnt drink like fish we could afford to have champers when we liked but we ended up with tipping the good stuff away 8-) funny people we are but it used to be put back in the fridge and waste away till it was flat . Anyway I found a cheapie Cafe d paris its cheap and nice and then we went looking for more cheap stuff and just incase we didt like it we bought Casis , wonderful stuff . Boring eh !

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robin, Alsace wines I do like, (mostly) particularly Gewurtztraminer ( with a Thai curry) and Alsace Pinot Noir. We have a really fine ( although expensive) specialist wine merchant locally ( Yapp bros. of Mere) who have a whole range of Alsace wines by a vigneron called Charles Schleret of Turkheim , most of which are delicious, although some are too 'perfumed' for my taste!

I seem to be 'allergic' to riesling -- I really do not know what people see in it -- the so-called 'petrolly' taste that wine writers speak of, really puts me off!

 

I have travelled quite a lot in France ( before buying the'van in Feb. 2010) so have sampled a good deal of the stuff 'En place'! My daughter did a year at the university of Bordeaux -- which neccessitated a few visits to che ck that she was O.K. ( strange that we took in St Emiliion, St. Julien, St.Estephe,etc. whilst we were there!)

I have already metioned our 'van tour of New Zealand in 2009, mainly French grapes with a Kiwi twist -- Pinot Noir again, Sauv. Blanc of course and Pinot Gris (Grigio). As I said earlier on this thread, they tried to convert me to Riesling, but my anti-German tendencies got in the way! I have had Austrian wines -- (very difficult to find here after the scandals concerning ethylene glycol some years ago) but the only one that I can remember is Gruner Veltliner -- drinkable, I seem to remember! Swiss wines I know not, because I have never been there. I have read that they do not travel well.My local wine merchant (see above) has wines from the Savoie, which I believe are somwhat similar and use some of the same grapes. I have tried some of those, but was not very impressed. I am mainly a French wine man, but who knows, as with classical music, there are always fresh fields to explore!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cassis isn't boring Michele, at least, not the white or rose wine from near Marseille! If you mean the mixture of Aligote white ( the second white grape of Burgundy after Chadonnay) and the wonderful blackcurrant liqueur of the same name, then that can be O.K. as a'pick-me up', too but a bit sweet for me!

It is better than 'Ribena' though!

 

Cheers!

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...