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What hobbies for the retired manager?


Brock

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I've two years to go to retirement unless something unexpected happens. No intention of staying on although my wife will work on another 5 years until she is 60. Money is not the problem and I expect to have a motorhome. Kids grown up and grandchildren are highly unlikely - thank goodness. Have had dogs before but am concerned that my eldest son, who still lives with us, and wife will spoil the next one.

 

I have thoroughly enjoyed my working life and currently get a tremendous buzz out of managing over 500 staff. I need hobbies that will give me the same buzz as work without tying me down to set routines - that probably rules out college or similar, is not work - so that rules out charities and part time working, and ensures I respect my marriage vows - that rules out dabbling with the chicks.

 

My interests are industrial heritage, motorhoming, walking, reading, photography, football but these haven't morphed into a proper hobby. I once dabbled with model railways [linked to industrial heritage rather than just playing trains]. Hate TV and music doesn't hold my attention. In fact, unless I am really interested in something, I have a very short attention span. DIY is not good for domestic bliss. I feel no moral urge to give back something to society as I have worked hard all my life in customer services.

 

So, have any retired managers faced the same problem and what hobbies did they take up? I need some exercise, some brain strain, and some people involvement although I can quite happily exist without excessive human contact.

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Ex- manager and senior manager at a variety of UK private sector companies, and latterly plc Director of one, and then another very large international companies/groups. All roles involved a lot of travel, both within the UK and internationally

 

"Retired" at 43....... retired only in the sense of quitting the corporate rat race.

 

Hobbies since?

 

Met new partner.

 

Moved to Spain.

 

Toured extensively on motorbikes before "retiring" so continued to do that for the first3 years or so. Then took up motorhoming and we now tour in it Europe-wide. A lot....maybe 20 weeks per year.

 

Learned Spanish.... not to expert, but to a good, competent level.

 

Taught myself to play harmonicas.

 

Then taught myself to play the saxophone.

 

Started singing....went to music "jam sessions" for a while and then went out on my own; now do a couple of live music gigs a week around in this region of Spain, and have played two gigs in Poland too.

(At around the same time I formed a rock band, which for a couple of years did maybe half a dozen big, outdoor stage type gigs a year).

 

Got married.

 

Gave up smoking.

 

 

 

I really don't feel there has been any lack of intellectual challenges over the past decade. The key difference has been that I can choose them for innate challenge/pleasure, not simply because I need to earn money.

You really do only get the one life, so REALLY try to ensure that you genuinely get the maximum amount of pleasure from it.

 

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Am I missing the point here , why is it so important to only seek the advice of other " Managers " . Surely retirement is the same for every walk of life is it not ? . The individual makes life and retirement , not there previous jobs .

 

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antony1969 - 2012-05-07 5:25 PM

 

Am I missing the point here , why is it so important to only seek the advice of other " Managers " . Surely retirement is the same for every walk of life is it not ? . The individual makes life and retirement , not there previous jobs .

Tony,

Its because certain people have only associated with people of a like mind and they have never associated with the "lower orders" to be retired is to mix it with all kinds of people with many and varied interests thereby finding a new niche to get settled in to enjoy ones retirement.

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As in work and life, it is the person not the job that matters and I quite happily mix. However, another manager may better understand the challenge I face when I retire. Sailing would at least cure my fear of the sea following my first escapade as a crew member on a yacht off Bridlington. BGD may be right and its just about getting stuck into life and see what comes.
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BGD - 2012-05-07 4:48 PM

 

Ex- manager and senior manager at a variety of UK private sector companies, and latterly plc Director of one, and then another very large international companies/groups. All roles involved a lot of travel, both within the UK and internationally

Something doesn’t ring true!! In 43 years, assume you went to uni so working life 20 years and you were all these. Either you were exceptional or found out?

 

So Brock the answer is, go to Spain become a musician and become one with yourself..

:D :D

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postnote - 2012-05-07 8:56 PM

 

BGD - 2012-05-07 4:48 PM

 

Ex- manager and senior manager at a variety of UK private sector companies, and latterly plc Director of one, and then another very large international companies/groups. All roles involved a lot of travel, both within the UK and internationally

Something doesn’t ring true!! In 43 years, assume you went to uni so working life 20 years and you were all these. Either you were exceptional or found out?

 

So Brock the answer is, go to Spain become a musician and become one with yourself..

:D :D

 

 

 

 

I made my money in less than 20 years in the rat race.

 

idiot.

 

Edited to add: I did not refer to you as an idiot. The server amended the original post. It appears it will not publish the adjective that I wish to use to describe your hiding behind an invented persona simply to cause trouble here. Shame.

 

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Guest peter

I have always had hobbies. Both when I was a manager and when I wasn't. I have had hobbies all my life and being retired is no different to when I was working, except I now have less time for my hobbies.

When you are working you dedicate some time for hobbies, but when retired you spend more time with the wife, and to clear off fishing for the day makes you feel a bit selfish, when you could be on the boat with the wife.

The secret is to have a good work/life balance whilst you are working.

A lot of people consider their work to be the most important thing in their life , and don't have any outside interests. This is very dangerous, as when the work ceases they feel totaly bereft of any meaning to their life.

I have always considered that what I did outside of work was far more important to me than what I did in work.

When I used to walk out the office door at 16.30 I switched off regarding work and concentrated on what I was going to do when I got home.

I haven't got a clue as to what you could do for a hobby, but mine are the following. Boating, Fly and sea fishing, Radio control model power boating, Radio control model aircraft, Car mechanics, Metal detecting, Motorhoming, Gardening, and Diy.

So, work was someting that paid the bills and filled in the time between doing my hobbies and sleeping.

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You have stated your interests:-

Industrial heritage, motor homing, walking, reading, photography, football

And if you treat the last with sufficient contemptr and concentrate on the rest I would have thought you could come up with something perhaps to do with pre industrial revolution technology and how the landscape has evolved in specific areas, Come on you are supposed to be able to think outside the box.

 

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If my father was anything to go by - it is the suddenness of complete retirement that caused him the most problem. He retired from a Senior Position in the Post Office that was very much a full time job - then the day after - nothing!

 

He was like a fish out of water.

 

So myself and my brother planned our retirement. My brother is 4 years my senior and is now fully retired but he still is asked to do the odd project but most he turns down now.

 

Myself - I work about 3 days a week and also manage our rental property. Pleasure time is our caravan on a seasonal pitch that we use as a holiday home. We do plan to tour again but with a motorhome or possibly a 5th Wheeler, in Europe as we have 'done' the UK.

 

From my families experience - sudden retirement is not good - Phasing your activities from work to whatever it is that you want to do is the key - what you specifically chose to do is pretty much irrelevant.

 

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BGD - 2012-05-07 10:56 PM

 

postnote - 2012-05-07 8:56 PM

 

BGD - 2012-05-07 4:48 PM

 

Ex- manager and senior manager at a variety of UK private sector companies, and latterly plc Director of one, and then another very large international companies/groups. All roles involved a lot of travel, both within the UK and internationally

Something doesn’t ring true!! In 43 years, assume you went to uni so working life 20 years and you were all these. Either you were exceptional or found out?

 

So Brock the answer is, go to Spain become a musician and become one with yourself..

:D :D

 

 

 

 

I made my money in less than 20 years in the rat race.

 

idiot.

 

Edited to add: I did not refer to you as an idiot. The server amended the original post. It appears it will not publish the adjective that I wish to use to describe your hiding behind an invented persona simply to cause trouble here. Shame.

Can see your management skills coming out in your post. You must have been some hell of a fellow to work for.....

Anyway, who are you to say that I hide behind an invented persona. Your not really Russel Grant, he has goner of the radar :D :D

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Very simple assuming you have the funds available do whatever you fancy whenever you want (provided it's legal and you have the wife's permission).

 

Spend you money and buy whatever you want. Much better than hoarding the money.

 

I retired late some 5 years ago and those years have been the best ever for both myself and my wife.

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Brock

You will be free to choose (within limits of legality & morality) whatever you wish you had no time for due to work commitments, etc..

You will have skills you can offer to various organisations on an as & when convienient basis.

But whatever you choose - keep active in mind & body.

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When I read these sort of posts I feel I must be different to a lot of others, as for me work was a dirty four letter word that got in the way of me doing the things I wanted. I was made redundant from a senior position in a large multi national company and had to find something for four years to get me to my company pension age. I built up a business which I sold for enough to last our lifetime and now live a very happy life doing just what we want, do I regret not working? Do I want a hole in my head? I will never regret the day I retired and work, well you can stick it, only the greedy and the poor work (though the greedy normally get the poor to work for them)! LoL!

 

Bas

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Basil - 2012-05-08 9:05 PM

 

When I read these sort of posts I feel I must be different to a lot of others, as for me work was a dirty four letter word that got in the way of me doing the things I wanted. I was made redundant from a senior position in a large multi national company and had to find something for four years to get me to my company pension age. I built up a business which I sold for enough to last our lifetime and now live a very happy life doing just what we want, do I regret not working? Do I want a hole in my head? I will never regret the day I retired and work, well you can stick it, only the greedy and the poor work (though the greedy normally get the poor to work for them)! LoL!

 

Bas

 

 

 

 

Bas - totally agree with you.

 

But my supposition is that you don't stop working just because you've quit the corporate rat race. I'm sure you do lots of things that take up loads of your time.

The difference is, I feel, that you are able to select those activities which bring you personally a sense of achievement, satisfaction, peace, fulfilment, rather than having to do things just to earn the money to live.

 

 

 

This is what the idiot little pug dog still cannot grasp, but yet is so bitter and jealous about.

His only sense of achievement is to snipe and pretend to be someone other then the real persona. Sad really, that someone can have achieved so little, can be so unfulfilled, and has to resort to pretence to find some sort of lonely fantasy.

 

Perhaps a sexual dysfunction is at the root of it's deep-seated emotional problems.

Yes, that must surely be it; an inability to satisfy any partners has caused its emotional void, its angst, its negative outlook.

Another form of jealousy about the achievements of others, both financial and in relationship terms.

A sad alternative to real friends, to real achievements, a result of deep-seated sexual impotence.

But hey ho. Life goes on for the rest of us.

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For the retired person a decent shed down at the bottom of the garden is the answer, somewhere to spend hours pottering about far away from the madding crowd.

You can potter about or have a serious hobby, preferably a hobby that can make you a shilling or two, my sanctuary is a littlemore than a basic shed it houses my lifetimes collection of quality woodworking machinery of which I am rather proud of, I dont have any problems in finding something to occupy my time with.

At this time of the year I stock up on logs that I get free from a local tree surgeon, cut and split them to size on the log splitter then stack and let them dry out and sell them in the autumn and winter, no probs in making a £100 in a morning delivering them to customers, easy peasy.

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You will need to change your attitude, for too long you have thought of yourself as part of an organisation, i.e you were your job. You have now reached the apex of all your aspirations, you no longer have to be a job description, you are yourself.

For many people this can be the hardest part, exactly who are you? for too long you have suppressed yourself and your feelings for the corporate good. One depressing? occurrence is if you are silly enough to attend any functions headed by your ex employer, rather than being included, you will feel like a spare       at a wedding.

Getting reacquainted with your wife when she retires is another source of friction, spending so long in her company after maybe 40 years of ships that pass in the night can be stressful.

 

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