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Stainless steel sinks and handwash


tonyishuk

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Noticed some rather persistent rusty marks in our washbasin sink in the m/home that could not be removed.

 

Turns out that the pump action hand wash has in small print on the base, do not use on stainless steel sinks !

 

So lovers of Imperial leather soap ,take care if you use Cussons carex handwash around the sinks.

 

Rgds

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Tony,

 

Please accept my apologies for doubting you, we've just looked at a newer bottle of Carex and you're dead right, I quote "Avoid contact with natural stone surfaces and stainless steel"

 

This is obviously a recent addition and goes along with a change of address from Stockport to Manchester and the addition of a website www.carex.co.uk.

 

I've entered 'stainless steel', 'steel' and 'stone' into the Carex website search and it comes up with no results so they obviously don't shout about it on their website.

 

One of the main ingredients of Carex is Sodium Chloride, or to you and me Salt. As Chlorine is one of the main Halogen salts my guess would be that this is the ingredient responsible for the attack. Try Googling 'Stainless Steel and Salt Water'. I think you'll be horrified as to what attacks SS.

 

So BE WARNED!!!

 

Keith.

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If you GOOGLE-search on "cussons carex stainless" (omitting the quotes) a couple of Waitrose-related entries should be retrieved relating to Carex "aloe vera" and "sensitive" handwash products. If you then click on, say, the aloe vera product and then on the "Cooking & Storage" tab, there's the warning that Keithl mentions. Clicking on the "Ingredients" tab lists the contents that include lactic acid and sodium chloride.

 

Now, while it's well recognised that 'acid' and 'salt' can corrode metal, including stainless steel, there is a need for realism. If you stick your hands in a strong acid solution or a strong brine solution, it won't do them any good - but the Carex products are intended to be squirted on hands in undiluted form.

 

It's been warned in the past that undiluted Milton sterilant (that contains about 16% sodium chloride) can eat through stainless steel if left on it for a while. But Milton diluted with water to the appropriate level can safely be drunk.

 

If the Carex products are allowed to remain in undiluted form on a stainless-steel or a natural stone work-surface for an extended period I guess they MIGHT cause marking, but I'm 100% confident that, if used 'normally', they won't. The thing to avoid (if you must) is not the usage, but leaving the stuff in long-term contact with the stainless-steel/stone material - something that's quite likely to happen if you don't watch out as these pump--action containers do tend to dribble.

 

It's worth mentioning that sodium chloride seems to be a standard ingredient in handwashes. My wif'es store-cupboard has 5 different makes of handwash in it at present, including a Carex product, and each make includes sodium chloride. If it's to be argued that 'salt' is the ingedient in the Carex handwash that has provoked the stainless-steel/stone warning, one might reasonably expect that warning to be commonplace on handwash containers. Me, I'd go for the lactic acid, as that ingredient appears only in the Carex product.

 

However, if you really want to get paranoid about handwash ingredients, this might be worth reading

 

http://www.theecologist.org/green_green_living/behind_the_label/269590/behind_the_label_antibacterial_handwash.html

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I think that the sink must have had drops of the solution on the s/steel for some while between uses. We tended to leave the bottle in the sink to stop the soggy bottom syndrome on the work surface.

 

I think what happens is that the solution in the bottle warms and cools over a period, then pumps the contents past the non return valve and leaves dribbles of concentrated goo on the sink.

 

Lesson learnt !

 

Rgds

 

PS Interesting link in above reply !

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These pump action dispensers are also altitude sensitive, in that falling barometric pressure as you gain altitude (crossing mountains etc), while the contents are at a higher (lowland) barometric pressure, also forces out the contents to. Easy to prevent, by unscrewing the cap sufficiently to allow the air pressures to equalise. You need to keep the dispenser upright for this to work.
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