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Scourge of the roads


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No not caravans or tractors - but Tesco lorries which are limited to 40 mph on single carriageway roads with a national speed limit of 60 mph, thus causing long tailbacks, road rage, dangerous overtaking by tormented reps and white vans.

 

Tesco say it is all about safety and reducing pollution - what a load of spheres!

 

It's all about cost cutting on fuel - fine by me - I'll do my own cost cutting at Tesco and shop at Morrisons and Asda.

 

I'm sure Tesco won't miss our two pennerth of sales but at least I feel better knowing that I do have some redress!

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My neighbour is a HGV driver and they hate it but its more than their job is worth to exeed it their taco is checked and recorded he knows he is a rolling road block but can't do anything about it. Try the A47 at about 7.30am no wonder its a red signed route. John >:-) >:-)
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Most of all the supermarket drivers are agency drivers, although they do have a small core of their own drivers so shopping elsewhere Rich would be pointless if Tesco is your nearest. The trucks are limited to 56mph also.

 

All the drivers digital tacho cards are checked and any infringements result in warnings, if they receive more than 2 warnings over a certain period, they are off the job. Nothing to do with fuel saving I'm afraid

 

Dave

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I'm afraid he's gone off at half cock again. :D

Though I must agree with him as to the speed these lorries go, if there's a tailback that stretches miles, you can bet that a Tesco lorry is at the head. It is really very annoying.

At least the many damn great tractor round our way pull in when they can to allow the traffic to clear.

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The EU have set the figure at which speed limiters must be set.

Therefore, even though our own government have imposed a speed limit of 60 mph on our motorways, EU laws mean that the limiters are set usually to 54 mph.

 

You car/van drivers should be made to spend a week or so with a lorry driver, perhaps then your attitudes would change and you would have a better understanding of what really happens.

Saying that, it would take away your cause for whingeing, let's be honest, one thread is moaning about lorries going too slow, the next is about speeding lorries, make up your minds for Gods' sake. *-)

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Guest pelmetman
What puzzles me is why the 40 mph limit seems to only apply to about half the lorries :-S........I've been overtaken when doing 50 mph in Horace by an artic, only to catch up with it a few miles latter stuck behind a Tesco lorry :D
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donna miller - 2012-10-16 8:36 AM

 

And you believe their lorries travel faster because..................?

 

They do - well the ones that I see do and the ones that I don't see are going faster than I am - but I do often get stuck behind a Tesco truck and never behind anyone else's truck.

 

I do sympathise with commercial vehicle drivers - I was one once and have driven many slow, governed and under powered commercial vehicles over the years and with deadlines to meet it ain't always fun.

 

I too can't understand why the speed limit law appears to be so selective?

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Seems to me, the whole idea of different speed limits for different vehicles is just plain crackers, except on dual carriageways where overtaking is relatively easy.

What's the point of my van having a limit of 60 when I'm stuck behind someone who's limit is 40, and there's nowhere to overtake?

On any given road the legal limit should be the same for everyone. Then it's up to drivers to drive safely, taking account of their vehicles' stopping distances etc.

On dual carriageways, this might also eliminate lorries crawling past each other for miles and miles, just because their governors are set SLIGHTLY differently.

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i am a lorry driver i can tell you the reason they are restricted to 40mph limit on a single carriageway is to help prevent DEATH

, i drive a bin lorry which has a gross weight of 26 tonne, at 40mph this takes alot of stopping if you need to brake hard, an artic will be around 32-38 tonne so that will take even more stopping, also all hgv &psv drivers have been forced by europe to take a certificate of professional competence (cpc) test lasting 35 hours over 5 years, every 5 years for life if they want to keep driving to ensure all are professional drivers aware of enviromental impacts, safe working practice etc. the lorries that overtake you on a single carriageway are breaking the law by speeding but are trying to get a job done in hours restricted by tough tachograph rules, the tachographs are able to be inspected by vosa at any place & any time & any continuous violations can & have resulted in a prison term

i personally know a couple of tesco drivers they have been told if they are caught speeding they will be on a 3 strikes & your out rule so basicly they are just trying to keep their jobs

regards

jamie

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Anyone who disagrees with this , try loading up your motorhome , water 2 people the works then get up to about 60 on the bypass or motorway , then try braking youll be scared out of your wits and realise what all that weight does to your stopping distance , believe me ive done it , and will never do it again . :-|
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They are pretty good Syd, but I wouldn't want to test the theory.

 

I suppose with most units now running 3+3 axles, that's a total of 12 brakes operating at the same time, unfortunately the majority trailers are still drum brakes, indeed a lot of tractor units still have drum brakes on the rear axle, so there is a lot of scope for brake fade if they are too hot, and more instances of failure than disc set-ups.

At low speeds, you can stop an artic on a sixpence (as you old people say) even running at 44 tonne, but as speeds increase, the stopping distances get way beyond that of a car.

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I would say Donna's point about slow speed stopping and high speed stopping is the key. At slow speed I have seen HGV's brake and stop on that sixpence (yes i am that old!!) - stopping is achieved with a lot of downward force such that the HGV rocks front to back and the air brakes go nuts.

 

I would suggest - I am no expert - that at higher speeds the grip on the tyres is such that as soon as heavy braking is tried the downward force transmitted via the brakes, through the tyres and onto the road is still there - but that the tyres (and from what I have seen, lorry tyres do not tend to have "grippy tyres") simply lose their grip such that at speeds over a certain limit the driver is now in charge of a 44 ton sledge.

 

My thoughts are that many car drivers have no idea of the difficulties driving one of these things incurs. Awareness of their issues such that we all give them a bit of leeway if we see one having to pull out in front of us or if they need to use all of the roundabout, or my recent favourite - an old boy totally oblivious of the need of the wacking great HGV who had right of way, approaching a railway bridge and had to take the middle line or take the bridge out!

 

Oh no! - this old boy was going through come what may and that HGV that could have squashd him flat was just going to have to stop! - Which the driver of the HGV managed to do - just! But in doing so had come "off the line" for getting under the bridge.

 

And the old boy drove off no doubt oblivious of the chaos he had caused. The HGV driver had to back up and do it again.

 

Best thing we can all do is to give HGV's a bit of space and for us to think ahead.

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Guest pelmetman

I'm still puzzled why less than half the lorries I follow on my fortnightly delivery run, from Lincolnshire to Essex seem to keep to the 40 mph limit :-S

 

There are very few dual carriageways in Lincolnshire *-)

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probably because they have all been given more jobs to do in an allocated time than would be possible if they sat at 40mph but maybe just to get home again, the tachograph also restricts driving hours & driver must have a 45 min break after

4 1/2 hours driving the dvla/ vosa website can give full details of these rules if anyone wants to see as it gets quite tricky trying to explain

on the subject of breaking on a sixpence the brakes are good enough to do that but start adding the physics of the load x travell speed add to that the type of load as different loads react in different ways it is the extra momentum that you are trying to stop aswell the vehicle

 

just slightly off topic with this next bit but are new learner drivers now taught that when they pass their car test they must

1.do not dip full beam untill you have dazzled the oncoming car

2.do not be curteous to other road users

3.drive your car as fast as possible (this may be to get all their lives accidents over with in 1 go)

4.forget everything the driving instructor taught you

 

 

 

 

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jam151 - 2012-10-17 4:43 PM

 

just slightly off topic with this next bit but are new learner drivers now taught that when they pass their car test they must

1.do not dip full beam untill you have dazzled the oncoming car

2.do not be curteous to other road users

3.drive your car as fast as possible (this may be to get all their lives accidents over with in 1 go)

4.forget everything the driving instructor taught you

 

 

 

 

5. always keep your front foglights on

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Tony Jones - 2012-10-17 5:02 PM

 

jam151 - 2012-10-17 4:43 PM

 

just slightly off topic with this next bit but are new learner drivers now taught that when they pass their car test they must

1.do not dip full beam untill you have dazzled the oncoming car

2.do not be curteous to other road users

3.drive your car as fast as possible (this may be to get all their lives accidents over with in 1 go)

4.forget everything the driving instructor taught you

 

 

 

 

5. always keep your front foglights on

 

Don't have foglights anymore Tony there driving lights ;-)

 

In reply to no 4, I don't know anyone who after passing their test drive like they were taught, I never did :-)

 

Worst loads I use to carry was:- Timber. Steel (especially bright steel) and Liquids with a thick viscosity.

 

Dave

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Tony Jones - 2012-10-17 5:02 PM

 

jam151 - 2012-10-17 4:43 PM

 

just slightly off topic with this next bit but are new learner drivers now taught that when they pass their car test they must

1.do not dip full beam untill you have dazzled the oncoming car

2.do not be curteous to other road users

3.drive your car as fast as possible (this may be to get all their lives accidents over with in 1 go)

4.forget everything the driving instructor taught you

 

 

 

 

5. always keep your front foglights on

 

Is it not written in the Beemer manuals that come with their cars????????

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Dave225 - 2012-10-17 8:40 PM

 

Tony Jones - 2012-10-17 5:02 PM

 

jam151 - 2012-10-17 4:43 PM

 

just slightly off topic with this next bit but are new learner drivers now taught that when they pass their car test they must

1.do not dip full beam untill you have dazzled the oncoming car

2.do not be curteous to other road users

3.drive your car as fast as possible (this may be to get all their lives accidents over with in 1 go)

4.forget everything the driving instructor taught you

 

 

 

 

5. always keep your front foglights on

 

Is it not written in the Beemer manuals that come with their cars????????

 

 

....doesn't have to be in the manual, AFAIK, they don't fit a switch. ;-)

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