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zak2442

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Hi Guys,

Would anyone know of a half decent sat-nav system for motorhomes,Just come back from a week in Cornwall and it was a nightmare,the only options i had on my sat-nav was car, bus, pedestrian,as i have a 24 foot motor i opted for bus well some of the lanes it tried to take me down i would have had second thoughts about on my motorbike.

 

Regards

Keith.

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I think that's if you are actually travelling in the bus!

I think all the major sat nav companies do those sat nav updates but they are mostly sourced around lorry technology and quite expensive.

We tend to use the map in conjunction with the sat nav as you can still end up going down a bus lane. Colmar in France was the last time we did that.

I'm sure someone on here will give you the name of one. :-D

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Hi Keith,

 

We use a TomTom Go7000 Truck - I think there is a new model out now Go7001? but if you Google TomTom Truck you should find it.

 

We have used ours for 3 years now and never had a problem with dead-ends, narrow roads, low bridges etc. and it warns you if there is no truck route available which usually means narrow roads, but it gives you the option to follow the car route, so at least you know what to expect.

 

Vehicle stats can be entered to cover width, height, length and axle weights. At times the routes are a little longer that the ones for cars because it also tries to avoid left turns where possible.

 

Please remember that you need the map install to suit - we got Western Europe which I think is about £140 on top of the cost of the sat nav unit.

 

Hope this helps.

 

John & Anne.

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Keith,

 

NONE of these so called MotorHome sat navs will be of any use once you venture off main roads as they are only as good as the maps on them and none of these maps have road widths for the types of lane you are travelling down so of absolutely no use!

 

Spend your money on an ordnance survey map of the area you are going to and plan your journey carefully before you set out and then, most importantly, if you do not like the look of a road DO NOT go down it.

 

In short the only width and height restrictions they can show you will be where there is an actual restriction on the road.

 

Keith.

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Keithl - 2012-10-18 6:55 PM

 

Keith,

 

NONE of these so called MotorHome sat navs will be of any use once you venture off main roads as they are only as good as the maps on them and none of these maps have road widths for the types of lane you are travelling down so of absolutely no use!

 

Spend your money on an ordnance survey map of the area you are going to and plan your journey carefully before you set out and then, most importantly, if you do not like the look of a road DO NOT go down it.

 

In short the only width and height restrictions they can show you will be where there is an actual restriction on the road.

 

Keith.

 

As far as we are concerned, we still try to plan ahead using a combination of paper maps,MS Autoroute express, plus Satnav, and generally a great deal of common sense when actulaly following the latter - if I dont like the look of a suggested turning, I simply dont take it.

We are currently in COrnwall, with the car, and following the Route suggested is generally fine, but certainly wouldnt be for the MH.... on TT at least you can always ask for an alternative route.

In reality this is no more than the preparation we would have done in 'pre satnav' days.....! If using a decent scale map, like OS or similar,its pretty easy to spot what roads are more suitable for the MH.

 

 

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Keithl - 2012-10-18 6:55 PM

 

Keith,

 

NONE of these so called MotorHome sat navs will be of any use once you venture off main roads as they are only as good as the maps on them and none of these maps have road widths for the types of lane you are travelling down so of absolutely no use!

 

Spend your money on an ordnance survey map of the area you are going to and plan your journey carefully before you set out and then, most importantly, if you do not like the look of a road DO NOT go down it.

 

In short the only width and height restrictions they can show you will be where there is an actual restriction on the road.

 

Keith.

Agreed, that exactly corresponds with the position as I understand it. Re the last para above, this means that where there is no LEGAL width restriction on a road, the sat nav will try to use it whatever its actual width (because the map data does not carry road width information).

 

What the "truck" type sat navs seem to do is favour main roads over others: they will take you on "A" (or local equivalent out of UK) roads to your destination, or as close as they can get you, because "A" roads are deemed generally suitable for all vehicle weights and sizes. This may result in greater mileages than might be the case using "B" (or local equivalent as above) roads. If you are happy with this, you should find the "truck" type devices work well for you.

 

If not, as suggested above, use a map to select your route before setting off, and insert waypoints on your sat nav along your route to force it to go your way. However, you'll still need to keep a sharp eye on what it is doing if you get diverted.

 

However, from memory, the only wide road in Cornwall is the one straight down the middle: all others are of the "interesting" type, and are used by buses, tractors, and trucks. You just need to know where to stop! :-D

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There is no sat-nav that will genuinely respond to the dimensional data you program once you are, cutting to the chase, off trunk roads.

Bottom line is: don't be suckered into paying a premium for units marketed at owners of larger vehicles. They are only any use for oversize trucks on major routes.

Best to come up with another strategy if you often find yourself down narrow lanes.

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These are interesting comments.

 

All I can say is that TomTom Truck has worked ok for us over the last 3 years - perhaps we have just been lucky (?)

 

However we have noticed that when we go out in the car with the TT set to 'car' then it uses different routes to the ones used when in the 'truck' setting, even to the extent of approaching camp sites from totally different directions - so something is going on inside its little chip. I suspect that A and B roads are favoured over C roads, the latter are definitely used whilst in 'car' setting.

 

Sat navs are there as an aid rather than the be all and end all - my better half nearly always has a road atlas to hand when we are travelling, she likes to know where we are or if there are any interesting places nearby that we may be passing 8-) This habit also serves as a double check on the route suggested by TT. I strongly agree with a previous comment "if you dont like the look of a road DO NOT go down it.

 

That is another feature of our TT that I like, the speed at which it finds an alternative route if you ignore an instruction or ask for an alternative to be found.

 

As with all things, common sense is the best approach. Don't let the sat nav make all the decisions, use it to your advantage because it will find specific addresses for you that maps wont :-)

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John & Anne - 2012-10-18 8:44 PMThese are interesting comments.All I can say is that TomTom Truck has worked ok for us over the last 3 years - perhaps we have just been lucky ...

Partially, yes you have. I guarantee you have also done many more miles in detours than were actually necessary. This old thread has a couple of posts regarding what is going on with 'trucker' units:

Whatever system of navigation you use, as soon as you turn off trunk roads in a motorhome, you run the risk of getting into difficulty. You can't really tell from a map. Some 'A' roads are more troublesome than some unclassified roads.

If you use a motorhome to regularly go off the beaten track you really need the tool for the job. PVCs with glass windows work well, tag-axle overcab coachbuilts don't. The in-between stuff may or may not.

I suppose it depends how adventuresome you are, and how bothered you are about battle scars.

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IMO the traffic feature is more important than the dimensions and weight limits and, comparing my own use of Garmin and TomTom, the latter's Live Traffic is far superior to Garmin's when it comes to detours around congestion.
I've read doubts about Snooper reliability elsewhere though many people seem happy with them.
I have a TomTom Camper & Caravan because that is what TomTom supplied (for a small supplement) when my Via Live 125 crashed when updating maps. In Ireland we were able to choose when to use Motorways and when to avoid them but, as Brian states, it's best to move from waypoint to waypoint if you want to see more than just traffic.
As an aside, TomTom replaced my Via 125 with a faulty one! I've just sent it off for repair and it has a firmware fault as well as missing software.
We don't have the best Broadband out here in the sticks and it struggles to stay just under 2gb. This makes updating maps online a risky business. The Camper & Caravan takes SD card updates, another plus point for me!
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My opinion is that sat nav is useless in a motor home use a good map and common sence. I speak from experience having used or rather attempted to use a few of them one of which i ended up throwing out the van when it got me jammed down a narrow lane.
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adonnante - 2012-10-19 2:44 PMNo help once on the road but I usually try to research the route on Google earth and when off the A roads check in street view. Roads without a centre white line I try to avoid.Peter.

But then you would miss the single track road, over the mountains via Tullich, from Loch Ness to the Certified Location at The Steadings! I checked it on street view and saw that there were no white lines but estimated that there should be a couple of inches of tarmac either side of the wheels! Besides, on Street View I didn't meet anything, but did catch up with a dustcart. In real time we met a van and another MH going the other way. Aren't field gateways great :-D
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zak2442 - 2012-10-18 5:37 PM

 

Would anyone know of a half decent sat-nav system for motorhomes,Just come back from a week in Cornwall and it was a nightmare,the only options i had on my sat-nav was car, bus, pedestrian,as i have a 24 foot motor i opted for bus well some of the lanes it tried to take me down i would have had second thoughts about on my motorbike.

 

How much you spend on one etc depends on your useage.

 

I'm not quite sure what proved such a nightmare touring Cornwall with the satnav you currently have, but if following it religiously.....then that was your first mistake.

 

Any SatNav is simply a guidance tool and should never ever be taken as Gospel, but this is where many people fall at the first hurdle and end up down dead end tracks or running over the edge of cliffs etc. A basic 'sense of direction' and knowledge of compass points is number one priority, secondly a set of decent road maps and ability to read them, then finally a SatNav. If you prioritise things like that then you won't go far wrong.

 

Even though I use a SatNav, I still write out my route directions on paper as I used to pre-satnav days. Pen and paper never fails......a SatNav can and does!

 

TomTom units are by far the most common with Garmin coming second. Matter of personal choice as both have plus and minus points. Whilst I was away I met a guy who ran both systems side by side as he liked the TT for things the Garmin didn't give him and vice versa.

 

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