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To-day the 8th its Official


kelly58

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To-day its official 65 to-day so now officially an OAP, with a large pay rise from HM Gov to confirm it !! but pleased that I retired 6 years ago and decided then to buy our 1st motorhome . We have been to and seen places in France we never dreampt would be possible an experience hopefully to continue . Never wish your time away , but spring seems a long way off.
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Guest pelmetman

Many happy returns......

 

I did have 11 years to go but now its 12 :'(...................unless they move the goal posts again >:-(...........

 

Been semi retired for 8 years now.......... I think I've got the hang of it, so reckon I could do it full time :D....

 

As soon as the house is sold we're off B-)

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Yes - many happy returns - I was 60 last month - a bit of a milestone - now looking forward to 65.

 

Tho' I do not intend to stop work even then.

 

Strange thing is that as i got older working became more enjoyable as it became less of a necessity and more of a lifestyle choice.

 

I still want to retire - mainly so as to travel longer in places like Oz. Had a month there back in 2009 - but want to go for 6 mths next time - then maybe NZ for another 6 mths! :-D

 

Only fear is as everyone says - the need is to do it now - as you never know what is round the corner. :-S

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Do it now Clive. Speaking from experience the difference between 60 and 65 is more marked than you think. Far too many bits stop working, or go on strike, or just become painful for no apparent reason. You also become more tired, even if you do not want to be. There is this poplar belief in the Press that we are all going to live to 100 and beyond. Well, maybe so in a few generations from now but not us lot methinks. So grab it while you can. Tomorrow may be too late.
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CliveH - 2012-11-08 5:38 PM

I still want to retire - mainly so as to travel longer in places like Oz. Had a month there back in 2009 - but want to go for 6 mths next time - then maybe NZ for another 6 mths! :-D

 

Only fear is as everyone says - the need is to do it now - as you never know what is round the corner. :-S

Yes, congratulations Kelvyn.Enjoy!

Clive , you are so right about doing it now -- I retired at 65 in 2009 and we did exactly what you want to do ( although for nothing like as long) 3 weeks in Brisbane ,where my daughter lives and 5 weeks campervanning in NZ -- where we caught the 'bug' and bought our 'van in2010.

We have had nearly 3 great touring seasons, until,3 months ago, when I was struck down with psoriatric arthropathy - very painful and disabling (anyone see the 'Singing Detective'?) But -- I'm lucky, I'm told that I should be back to motorhoming/walking/gardening etc. in 3-6months if my current treatment is successful - I certainly hope so - but don't 'hang about' folks -- you never know what fickle fate might bring!

 

Cheers and good luck Kelly

 

Colin.

 

P.S. Dave you beat me to it -- seems we're singing from the same hymnsheet!

 

C.

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Point taken Dave - we are planning an exit strategy - but like a lot of people our plans have been affected by the financial situation - that said - we are considering a change more and more.

 

One of the joys of being 60 is free prescriptions - but apart from a bit a hay fever induced asthma I am not on anything. And have "the BP of a 30 year old" according to the nurse that checked me out recently.

 

As for grabbing things - I did try the other night but SWMBO had a headache.

 

Another joy was getting in the post a late 60th birthday present of a stool (poo) sampling kit from Southampton University. This was an unexpected delight.

 

You put a carrier bag in the loo to catch a turd (all together now - "Catch a falling turd and put it in a paper bag, never let it flush away.........") Then using the kit you take a cardboard knife and take a sample from one end of the turd and then taking another "knife" you take another sample from the other end.

 

Each sample is smeared onto a little window in a specially designed cardboard "envelope" receptacle and the date put in the lid when you close it. Over the next week or so you do this twice more on separate days.

 

You send this off and they test it for Bowel Cancer. Mine came back negative - so i may well be full of it but mine is OK. I get the joy of doing this every three years.

 

And i have to say I am totally delighted and VERY supportive of this excellent preventative scheme. Bowel cancer is something that can develop silently with few symptoms until it is sometimes too late.

 

Prevention really is better than a cure.

 

Thank you to all those who work on this and other schemes like it.

 

 

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Guest pelmetman

Yum Yum........ 8-)

 

According to a chap on the news who's just reached 110................he put his long life down to laziness ;-) .............If that's true then I'll be alright (lol) (lol) (lol)

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I retired at 66 mainly because I was offered one hell of a financial inducement to work an extra year paid directly into my pension fund making it tax free. I figured the extra dosh would help us to be able to buy what we liked and do what we liked with no financial worries. I'm glad I did stay on. I've now been retired for six years and had one hell of a good time. The one thing I faild to anticipate was that my wife had a wish list of major projects lined up for me (I'm working on one now). I don't let it get in the way of our travels but I must say it has kept me fit and from getting bored. How many other 72 year olds are still fit enough to spend the best part of a day swinging a pick axe?
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Many people who are on the threshold of retirement have what one could call' second thoughts' and worries about all sorts of things. Will we have enough money is usually number 1, will my health remain is number 2 and what will I do is number 3.

 

The answers are out there you just have to jump in and swim.

 

You will never have enough money to doa ll you fancy doing, unless you have had a totally different lifestyle to teh majority of us. In most of our cases you look at what you have and then think what can I do without, to make it all fit. Actually doing the 'saving thing' can often be a bit of fun in your lives. Using the bus pass is a start as it saves fuel costs, having coffee (long coffee reading the newspapers) will save heating at home and gets you out and about. Going on long holidays saves the cost of travel there and back several times. Not doing the touristy things when you get there but sit and read, swim, laze or just sit and sit saves money quickly and leaves you relaxed. A very rough ball park is you can probably get by on about 30% of what you spend as a working soul; unless of course you frequent the bookies, pub etc. You do not need to change your car every year, or even pay company car tax anymore. The house will relax with you in old age and the wallpaper can always last another year.

 

Health wise is always an unknown, so do not put off till tomorrow as it may never come, and then everything you have done moneywise is wasted. Ailments will come your way but as long as they do not make you housebound, then work with them. Also remember your partner may have problems he/she does not tell you about, so think what they may want to do, and do it.

 

Many people cannot face retirement as their sense of importance is lost. After all you fancy yourself as a key member of society and what will they do without you? Lots in fact. Business will survive, things will function normally and you will not have the hassle. It is great fun sitting on a bus and when someone's phone rings you know you do not have to make excuses of why you are not where you are expected to be. One of our cost saving measures is that our PAYGO phone only requires topping up every 6 months or so and then with a tenner. When my employer gave me a Blackberry I knew it was time to go. You do not have to find hobbies to fill your time, every retiree will tell you that having enough time to do everything is a big issue and they just do not know how they managed to fit in work. Weeks will flash by without you even knowing what happened. The best bit is putting off till tomorrow something you might have wanted to do today, and then taking your time doing it. Sounds a bit 'Irish' I know but retirees know.

 

Plus if you retire then a young person can get your job so you are doing a good deed for society. That was my excuse anyway.

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The advice from Dave is sound. Do it now while you can whatever it is. Old age caught up with me at 75 and seriously curtails my cycling and about the same time the OH developed Parkinsons. What to do? We sold a workshop we owned and bought a more suitable (ie bigger) motorhome with the proceeds. Sod saving it as it would only get confiscated by the state anyway. Better times at our age are rarely round the next corner.
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Guest pelmetman

My only disagreement with Dave's post is the money issue ;-)....................I've never earn't so little, yet had so much fun and time away in the camper B-)

 

If you need too shop to enjoy life, then you'll struggle as a retired person *-)................

 

Correction :$.................just re read Dave's post............as he said money shouldn't be the issue ;-)

 

Should've gone to spec savers :D

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Money should not dominate life but it is an issue, especially if you do not have enough. I recognise that there are many in our society who are struggling on the basic old age pension and will never have motorhomes/caravans etc. Whether this is a result of their own actions or other factors is something I cannot say.

 

However, one thing I have noticed that is not such a good thing is the number of people who decide after the kids have left home, or who are on the brink of retirement that they can no longer live together. This then splits all the money into 2 so neither has enough to do anything significant and trying to get 2 homes is a nightmare at an old age. This event is sometimes precipitated by a)kids leaving or b) retirement after years of bluntly separate lives. So, my point is that even in work you need to consider your partner and ensure that both of you look forward to retirement, not dread it.

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Thursday I received my 1st pension payment from HM Gov the biggest annual payrise in my entire working life and as I was allways paid weekly I asked for my OAP to be paid weekly and have now ordered the new editions of the ASCI Camping Guide and the New edition of the Aires book from Vicarious books ready for next year. Looking forward to taking delivery of our new motorhome in March 2013 with the old one sat on the drive with a for sale notice in the window.
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