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Peugeot Boxer seat height


SuzieH

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We've had our 2006 Autocruise Starburst six months, BUT the passenger seat is much higher than is comfortable - tall adults can't see out the windscreen and short adults have "dangley" legs!

 

When the driver seat is in the lowest position, the passenger seat is 7cms higher.

 

The passenger seat can not be lowered or tilted. There is - (what seems to be a spacer 7 cms deep) - between the chair and the sliders. Have taken chair off, but then can't re-attach directly to sliders.

 

Chair is an ISRI Atessa S.P.a - the Isringhausen site is no help!

 

Does anyone know how to solve the problem? PLEASE

 

 

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Hi Suzie,

 

We had the same problem with our 2006 Starburst and it made me have to duck slightly to see out of the windscreen so we replaced the seat bases with two from Marcle Leisure and although our van had the original Peugeot seats the new lower bases and removal of the drivers side swivel base helped a lot and made the driving position much more comfortable on long hauls.

 

Marcle no longer appear to list the boxes for your model van but this is the latest incarnation.

 

http://www.marcleleisure.co.uk/store/lower-seat-fiatpeugeotcitroen-swivel-included-p-4103.html?osCsid=6da4148ae80ed1944ca7c98f587bf79b

 

I don't know how the heights compare or if the new one will fit the old van but I think possibly not. They might have the older type if you ask them?

 

If you think it will work for you I still have the two bases if you (or anyone else) are interested as I returned the van to original spec when I sold it last year.

 

The previous model bases differ from the new tubular type in that they are solid sheet steel with an open front for access and storage and are about 17cm high at the front and 18 at the back and I suspect that the bolt holes and fixing is slightly different.

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I came across a 'back street garage' about five years ago who where making replacements for the folded sheet steel seat base out of four lengths of angle iron welded into a square with 2 flanges on the bottom and the other 2 on the top.

This frame simply replaced the original seat box.

 

If you take the seat off the box then unbolt the box off the floor you should be able to see what I mean, or look at this item on eBay Link to eBay and imagine it being replaced by a simple frame.

 

Keith.

 

Edit,

 

I meant to say then take the box to a fabricators and get an angle iron square welded up with holes drilled to match.

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On a previous van I took the seat box out, cut it in half with an angle grinder, adapted the top half to fit over the bottom half, bolted the whole lot back together 2" lower and made up new facings to disguise the joins!

 

That worked well and didn't cost a penny - other than a few cutting discs and odds and ends from the garage!!

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I agree with others who've simply, and very cheaply, "DIY'ed" the seat-base lowering job.

 

Piece of cake for a competent DIYer, or a local jobbing fabrication/engineering workshop.

 

Making the modification so that height is adjustable in future (as Tracker did) via an overlap between the top section and bottom section, with bolt-hole at various heights, seems the most elegant solution.

 

 

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BGD - 2013-02-19 8:40 AM

 

Making the modification so that height is adjustable in future (as Tracker did) via an overlap between the top section and bottom section, with bolt-hole at various heights, seems the most elegant solution.

 

 

I would hardly call my first attempt - bodge - elegant Bruce - but it worked OK.

 

I have not researched it because I didn't much care, but I think there is an issue with type approval and official safety regulations for home made solutions?

 

It is possible that shop bought boxes cost more due to possible testing and type approval costs - I do know that they are well over engineered, quite heavy and very strong.

 

The more modern bases are tubular and with various bends and angles are much less easy to lower - not impossible but really needs expert welding which once done may be in breach of regulations - not that anyone would know except an accident investigator or maybe an alert MOT tester?

 

I'm not saying don't do it but I am saying be aware of the implications.

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Hi guys

 

Thanks for all your suggestions - as Traker says - no wrong way! We have got the tubular steel box, which is then topped with swivel, slider and then a deep pressed steel spacer with no adjustment/tilt/tip.

 

We spent most of yesterday at NEC show - sitting in cabs and looking at how the current seats work. We did not buy a new motorhome :=(

 

However, this morning we visited a local van breakers and - hey presto - found several complete "ex-van" seats. We had to buy the lot! - but quickly removed the seat adjustment spacer "bit".

 

A couple of hours work and we now have a fully adjustable passenger seat - my feet touch the floor & husband can see out the windscreen.

 

Would recommend this solution as worked out cheaper than parts from specialist web sites and was quicker than cutting/welding.

 

Now only a few other wrinbkles to iron out.

 

Hope this helps others with similar problems.

 

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Well done Suzie - so glad the art of using one's noddle to overcome a problem instead of the credit card is alive and thriving!!

 

I would never have paid for our boxes at well over 200 quid either - Marquis paid for them for me to clinch the deal over and above the agreed changeover price and all I had to was fit them myself - simples!!

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