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2110 Fiat Ducato Motorhome Timing belt


limerick

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1900 miles is a joke. Depends how deep your pockets are and your fear of what dealers tell you.

Normally it's at least 60k miles or 7 yrs at least. I personally go with mileage rather than age. But it's entirely up to you. It should be stated in the vehicle handbook anyway, and manufacturers always err on the side of caution for obvious reasons. Thank god I've got a mercedes which is chain driven.

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They harden with age, and they wear with mileage, as does the tensioner. So, both are equally valid grounds for replacement. The age/mileage for replacement is usually stated somewhere in the service schedule. The cost of replacement is considerable but, as stated, nowhere near the cost of breakage! Best to change when stated.
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I had mine changed straight after I bought it at 6 years old with 30000 miles on the clock. The Fiat main dealer said it should be done again after 4 years or 75000 miles whichever comes first.

 

That was 3 years ago and 12000 miles So if you go by mileage I will need to change it again in 2029

 

I will chance 5 years and have it replaced again in 2015. Five years is a nice round number. :-)

 

After having it changed I got 3 mpg more than before so it will have well have paid for it's self in 5 Years.

 

Good Advice previously given.

Have the complete timing kit changed, not just the belt.

 

The kit for my 2004 2.0 ltr Ducato cost £170 imported from Fiat Italy. That was in 2010.

 

 

 

 

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Cliffy - 2013-03-10 9:46 PM

 

 

I had mine changed straight after I bought it at 6 years old with 30000 miles on the clock. The Fiat main dealer said it should be done again after 4 years or 75000 miles whichever comes first.

 

That was 3 years ago and 12000 miles So if you go by mileage I will need to change it again in 2029

 

I will chance 5 years and have it replaced again in 2015. Five years is a nice round number. :-)

 

After having it changed I got 3 mpg more than before so it will have well have paid for it's self in 5 Years.

 

Good Advice previously given.

Have the complete timing kit changed, not just the belt.

 

The kit for my 2004 2.0 ltr Ducato cost £170 imported from Fiat Italy. That was in 2010.

 

 

 

3 MPG better consumption? Wow! Pity I've got a Mercedes and as I haven't got a belt, I won't be in a position to get this consumption boost. :D
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The time-intervals for Ducato timing-belt changing are mentioned here:

 

http://www.essanjay.co.uk/services/

 

I don't know if the information is correct, but I'd be surprised if time-interval/mileage limits for belt changing are not covered in Ducato Owners manuals.

 

Logically, if just the timing-belt is replaced, there will be no measurable effect on the vehicle's performance. I'm not doubting Cliffy's claim that his motorhome's mpg increased after the belt-change, I'm just saying that the belt-change alone could not have produced this improvement.

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Guest Peter James
limerick - 2013-03-09 8:53 PM

was advised by a dealer to change the timing belt when it was only 4 years old and 1900 mls on the clock

 

Never ask a Barber if you need a haircut

(Quote from Warren Buffet)

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Guest Peter James
Brian Kirby - 2013-03-10 7:21 PM

 

They harden with age, and they wear with mileage, as does the tensioner. So, both are equally valid grounds for replacement. The age/mileage for replacement is usually stated somewhere in the service schedule. The cost of replacement is considerable but, as stated, nowhere near the cost of breakage! Best to change when stated.

 

True. But with my luck I would probably change my 4 year old belt for one that had been sitting on a storeroom shelf for 4 years *-)

Do they still harden with age that much when not exposed to sunlight by the way (?)

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Sophie - 2013-03-11 5:04 PM

 

Can I highjack please by asking-what's the situation re the 3.0litre chain driven? Does this ever have to be replaced?

 

You'd need to replace the chain if a mechaniical problem developed with it. Otherwise, the mileage that would need to be covered to cause the chain to wear out would be so great that it's most unlikely that any motorcaravanner would achieve it. Realistically, unless something goes wrong with it, the timing-chain will last the life of the motor.

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Its a perennial problem with a ""New" motor-home which as had its engine, cab etc sitting around from the day the engine was built, stood in the various factories.

 

Engine oil, batteries, brake fluid, cam belts, tyres, cooling fluids and other stuff I have forgotten can be over two years old on a your new m/home is one day into newly registered M/home.

 

So when and what should change ?

 

Rgds

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tonyishuk - 2013-03-11 8:01 PM

 

Its a perennial problem with a ""New" motor-home which as had its engine, cab etc sitting around from the day the engine was built, stood in the various factories.

 

Engine oil, batteries, brake fluid, cam belts, tyres, cooling fluids and other stuff I have forgotten can be over two years old on a your new m/home is one day into newly registered M/home.

 

So when and what should change ?

 

Rgds

 

Good point, so should it be 5 years from the chassis build date and NOT the registration date?

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Mel B - 2013-03-11 8:35 PM...............Good point, so should it be 5 years from the chassis build date and NOT the registration date?

That is not the way the manuals are written. Until it is used it sits under the bonnet, in the dark, and is only at ambient temperatures. Little there to shorten its life.

 

There will be a safety margin in both mileage and age limits to take account of the storage lives of components, of differences in make up between one belt and the next, and differences in operating conditions of the vehicles. I'd be surprised if the belts are more than a few weeks old when first fitted, so sitting in a compound somewhere for even a few months should have minimal effect on life.

 

Besides, they won't fly apart the day after the recommended time has expired, and your little truck will probably never surpass the mileage for replacement. If you still have yours after five years (unlikely on past precedent! :-)), just get it done at the end of the fifth year as part of its annual service.

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limerick - 2013-03-13 5:18 PM

 

After reading all the comments I think I will change the belt after 5 years ,thanks to everyone for replying

 

As Derek says it's in the owners manual, 180,000km or every 5years.

As for Cliffy's 3mpg, it's not uncommon for belts to be installed one tooth out and the engine run just a bit down on performance.

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Derek Uzzell - 2013-03-11 5:15 PM

 

Sophie - 2013-03-11 5:04 PM

 

Can I highjack please by asking-what's the situation re the 3.0litre chain driven? Does this ever have to be replaced?

 

You'd need to replace the chain if a mechaniical problem developed with it. Otherwise, the mileage that would need to be covered to cause the chain to wear out would be so great that it's most unlikely that any motorcaravanner would achieve it. Realistically, unless something goes wrong with it, the timing-chain will last the life of the motor.

 

The only breakage that I have suffered in 50 years motoring has been to a chain driven camshaft. The details were that the car was a petrol driven 1.3 Yaris, on the overrun in 3rd gear at about 30 mph. The vehicle had been properly serviced by the Toyota main dealer (who had supplied the vehicle). Toyota paid up in full without any argument at all.

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After six years, I begrudgingly acknowledge I need the cambelt changing, despite only 17,000 miles. I've just had two quotes for the job from Fiat dealerships at Crawley and Epsom. £480 and £500 respectively, including parts, labour and VAT.

 

Shaun

 

 

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Keep shopping around Shaun and avoid Fiat dealers. Fiat engine is not high tech and neither is changing cam belt. My local garage, which is mainly HVG, changed mine and serviced for about £300+. Provided genuine Fiat parts used this will not affect your warranty and get booked stamped.
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