Jump to content

Teenage suicides


nightrider

Recommended Posts

I have sent in a thread like this before, I'm not becoming obsessed with it but more aware of teenagers committing suicide, why, is it the pressure and stress they are under or what? a grandson of mine has just left school and goes back in September to do some further studying so in the meantime he is working in my yard to earn pocket money, he will have to learn to duck and dive and survive in the hostile world that we now live in, I read in the paper that Ireland is thinking of adding lithium to the drinking water in order to lower the suicide rates, don't know what lithium does, perhaps someone can enlighten me.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know that Lithium forms the 'active' component of some psychiatric medications, but like you am unsure as to its exact role in affecting the behaviour of the patient. Have a read of:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/shortcuts/2011/dec/05/should-we-put-lithium-in-water

 

and for a bit more .........

 

http://www.infowars.com/psychiatrist-calls-for-lithium-to-be-added-to-irelands-water/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds awful having medication forced upon us all because of the needs of a few.

 

But the idea behind it is that usually Lithium is a natural constituent of our diet. So we potentially all behave oddly without it.

 

Still have reservations tho.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it just teenage suicides on the rise or across the board are they on the up ?

I know when we were younger I can remember four lads killing themselves who we knew , 1 was always depressed so that was no shock the other 3 were down to teenage broken hearts over girls , silly lads .

Love or thinking you are in love accounts for a large chunk of teenage suicides I would have thought .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Malcolm,

Lithium, as a naturally occuring mineral salt, is already present, as a constituent of drinking water, in some areas, as noted above.It has been found to be associated with lower than average suicide rates in such places as Japan and Texas, hence the Irish interest in it, faced with increased suicide among the population, particularly teenagers, see here: http://www.thejournal.ie/teenage-suicide-rate-increase-ireland-560216-Aug2012/. However, as Clive, points out, we would have forced medication for all -- and we all know about the furore that the addition of fluoride (another naturally occuring compound) caused, some 40 or so years ago -- there are already inflammatory scare stories in the press about 'drugging' water, in response to the Irish suggestion.

Lithium salts, as a medication for use in the treatment of mental illness, have been around since the 1930's, and, until other, more modern, psychotropic drugs have come into use, was the most highly effective long-term treatment for what used to be called manic-depression and is now more usually referred to as bi-polar disorder. When used on these patients, clinically, there is a marked reduction in suicide rates and suicide attempts. However, there can be serious side-effects and patients' blood/lithium levels have to be closely monitored (for life) unless (particularly) severe kidney problems are to result. A friend of mine, the wife of a fellow - student from my college days, is now without the use of either kidney and needs constant dialysis due to the long-term effects of lithium. I am only thankful that my G.P., in 1990, sucessfully fended off a keen young clinical psychiatrist, who tried to foist it on me as the best thing since sliced bread! As far as its use in tap water is concerned, surely someone will point out that at medicinal levels, it it highly tetragenic, i.e., causes birth deformities.

As far as the increase in suicide rates goes, particularly among the young, many studies put it down to unemployment and the recession -- mirroring the sharp jump (excuse the pun!) in suicide rates which took place in Britain & the U.S.A. following the 'Wall street crash' and subsequent depression of the 1930's. Incidentally, 2 weeks before the Wall street crash, a 'lithiated' fizzy drink was marketed in the U.S.A. -- it later went under the name of: 7UP' -- the addition of lithium to it was banned in 1948.

Just to end -- I have a theory (unsubastantiated and certainly not original) that there is a 'fashion' in this behaviour (as with so many things affecting young people) which is being fanned by the dreaded 'social media' and internet sources generally. Keeping your grandson well-occupied sounds like a good idea to me, Malcolm -- not, I'm sure, that he is likely to get any 'funny ' ideas into his young head!

 

Cheers,

 

Colin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Symbol Owner - 2013-07-04 11:24 AM

 

Just to end -- I have a theory (unsubastantiated and certainly not original) that there is a 'fashion' in this behaviour (as with so many things affecting young people) which is being fanned by the dreaded 'social media' and internet sources generally. Keeping your grandson well-occupied sounds like a good idea to me, Malcolm -- not, I'm sure, that he is likely to get any 'funny ' ideas into his young head!

 

Cheers,

 

Colin.

 

Colin, I too subscribe to the above 'theory'. Unfortunately I don't think some teenagers realised the 'finality' of what they are contemplating, and in areas where there is a 'hot spot' as it were, I believe that some of this is down to the fact that the initial suicide puts the idea into others' heads and they then think it is the 'solution' to their particular predicament. Nowadays the social media can cause those of a sensitive nature to be put under a lot of external pressure/ridicule/bullying etc, something that in the past wasn't so constant. In some cases with the excessive access to the internet via smart phones, laptops, tablet pcs etc which a lot of them now have, this unfortunately puts them on the receiving end of such things virtually constantly, which they are not equipped to rationally deal with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest pelmetman

I'll put this in my usual unsympathetic way ;-).................the trendy wendy's who have taken over the asylum *-)...................and have through moral outrage banned the thick ear..........and replaced discipline with the naughty step *-).................and are now wondering why teenagers are topping themselves at the first bit of emotional pressure................need to have a long hard look at themselves *-).................

 

To much thinking is bad for you at any age ;-)

 

As an aside years ago a young girl nearly landed on my van roof as I drove by, when she decided to jump off the multi story car park in Colchester 8-).........................reason.............. exam pressure *-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mel B - 2013-07-04 8:29 PM

 

Symbol Owner - 2013-07-04 11:24 AM

 

Just to end -- I have a theory (unsubastantiated and certainly not original) that there is a 'fashion' in this behaviour (as with so many things affecting young people) which is being fanned by the dreaded 'social media' and internet sources generally. Keeping your grandson well-occupied sounds like a good idea to me, Malcolm -- not, I'm sure, that he is likely to get any 'funny ' ideas into his young head!

 

Cheers,

 

Colin.

 

Colin, I too subscribe to the above 'theory'. Unfortunately I don't think some teenagers realised the 'finality' of what they are contemplating, and in areas where there is a 'hot spot' as it were, I believe that some of this is down to the fact that the initial suicide puts the idea into others' heads and they then think it is the 'solution' to their particular predicament. Nowadays the social media can cause those of a sensitive nature to be put under a lot of external pressure/ridicule/bullying etc, something that in the past wasn't so constant. In some cases with the excessive access to the internet via smart phones, laptops, tablet pcs etc which a lot of them now have, this unfortunately puts them on the receiving end of such things virtually constantly, which they are not equipped to rationally deal with.

 

Mel , with respect if we are breeding teenagers who don't realise the finality of suicide then we are in big , big trouble .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

antony1969 - 2013-07-04 9:29 PM

 

Mel B - 2013-07-04 8:29 PM

 

Symbol Owner - 2013-07-04 11:24 AM

 

Just to end -- I have a theory (unsubastantiated and certainly not original) that there is a 'fashion' in this behaviour (as with so many things affecting young people) which is being fanned by the dreaded 'social media' and internet sources generally. Keeping your grandson well-occupied sounds like a good idea to me, Malcolm -- not, I'm sure, that he is likely to get any 'funny ' ideas into his young head!

 

Cheers,

 

Colin.

 

Colin, I too subscribe to the above 'theory'. Unfortunately I don't think some teenagers realised the 'finality' of what they are contemplating, and in areas where there is a 'hot spot' as it were, I believe that some of this is down to the fact that the initial suicide puts the idea into others' heads and they then think it is the 'solution' to their particular predicament. Nowadays the social media can cause those of a sensitive nature to be put under a lot of external pressure/ridicule/bullying etc, something that in the past wasn't so constant. In some cases with the excessive access to the internet via smart phones, laptops, tablet pcs etc which a lot of them now have, this unfortunately puts them on the receiving end of such things virtually constantly, which they are not equipped to rationally deal with.

 

Mel , with respect if we are breeding teenagers who don't realise the finality of suicide then we are in big , big trouble .

 

No arguments from me on that point Antony ... I suspect a lot of them nowadays appear to live in a 'video' world and don't for whatever reason feel any sort of reality. Another problem IMV is that they are left to get on in their own 'little bubble' by parents who don't interact with them much if at all, so when they do need 'help' they don't feel they have anyone to turn to. Very sad. :-|

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Peter James
Statistically, by far the biggest danger to children seems to be from other children. What has changed in recent years is the particularly English gutter press obsession with paedophilia. The hysteria may have reached such a stage that adults can be reluctant to try to help youngsters in trouble in case their motives are misconstrued. :-(
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter James - 2013-07-11 6:41 PM

 

Statistically, by far the biggest danger to children seems to be from other children. What has changed in recent years is the particularly English gutter press obsession with paedophilia. The hysteria may have reached such a stage that adults can be reluctant to try to help youngsters in trouble in case their motives are misconstrued. :-(

 

Obsession with paedophilia ?

Personally I do not believe such an obsession exists . I am glad cases get reported instead of been brushed under the carpet like back in the old days . If highlighting the problem makes it easier for one child to report a case then I say brilliant .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Peter James
antony1969 - 2013-07-11 8:21 PM

 

I am glad cases get reported instead of been brushed under the carpet like back in the old days . If highlighting the problem makes it easier for one child to report a case then I say brilliant .

 

Brushing the problem under the carpet was deference to the upper classes, Sir Jimmy Savile OBE KCSG, Sir Cyril Smith MBE, Stuart Hall OBE, Clergymen etc who were thought to be above such things because of their titles!!!. Even at that time if it had been a BBC cleaner doing the same thing his feet wouldn't have touched the ground. Nowadays the internet has made it much harder for the Establishment to hush things up.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter James - 2013-07-11 8:38 PM

 

antony1969 - 2013-07-11 8:21 PM

 

I am glad cases get reported instead of been brushed under the carpet like back in the old days . If highlighting the problem makes it easier for one child to report a case then I say brilliant .

 

Brushing the problem under the carpet was deference to the upper classes, Sir Jimmy Savile OBE KCSG, Sir Cyril Smith MBE, Stuart Hall OBE, Clergymen etc who were thought to be above such things because of their titles!!!. Even at that time if it had been a BBC cleaner doing the same thing his feet wouldn't have touched the ground. Nowadays the internet has made it much harder for the Establishment to hush things up.

 

Those names you give Peter if what I read is correct were carrying out perverted attacks against children long , long before they had any titles so your argument on the basis falls apart .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Had Enough
antony1969 - 2013-07-11 9:13 PM

 

Peter James - 2013-07-11 8:38 PM

 

antony1969 - 2013-07-11 8:21 PM

 

I am glad cases get reported instead of been brushed under the carpet like back in the old days . If highlighting the problem makes it easier for one child to report a case then I say brilliant .

 

Brushing the problem under the carpet was deference to the upper classes, Sir Jimmy Savile OBE KCSG, Sir Cyril Smith MBE, Stuart Hall OBE, Clergymen etc who were thought to be above such things because of their titles!!!. Even at that time if it had been a BBC cleaner doing the same thing his feet wouldn't have touched the ground. Nowadays the internet has made it much harder for the Establishment to hush things up.

 

Those names you give Peter if what I read is correct were carrying out perverted attacks against children long , long before they had any titles so your argument on the basis falls apart .

 

Yes, you beat me to it and I don't think I've read a bigger load of b*ll*cks on this forum!

 

But of course you're dealing with a man here with an obsessive hatred against the monarchy, the establishment and anyone in a relatively high position.

 

The simple fact is that these people have been prosecuted, so once again his argument collapses!

 

Members of both houses of parliament have been prosecuted recently and jailed. Members of the aristocracy have been prosecuted and jailed when they been discovered breaking the law, but in Peter James' world all of this section of society is immune from the forces of the law!

 

Even senior police officers are prosecuted as we have seen just recently. One would imagine that if the police force is going to turn a blind eye to anyone it would be their own!

 

In this modern age it's virtually impossible to cover anything up and forty years ago the cleaner was just as likely as anyone else to have escaped prosecution for groping girls. It was a different age with different morals!

 

Best of all though was that he thinks that Jimmy Savile, Stuart Hall and Cyril Smith are in the 'upper classes'. The woman who was, for thirty years, a school crossing lady at my daughter's school was awarded an MBE. Next time I see her I must congratulate her on becoming 'upper class'. She'll be dead chuffed! (lol) (lol)

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

antony1969 - 2013-07-04 10:24 AM

 

Is it just teenage suicides on the rise or across the board are they on the up ?

I know when we were younger I can remember four lads killing themselves who we knew , 1 was always depressed so that was no shock the other 3 were down to teenage broken hearts over girls , silly lads .

Love or thinking you are in love accounts for a large chunk of teenage suicides I would have thought .

 

You may well have a point there Antony.

My theory is that there is a definite correlation between thread length on here and the urge to end it all.

If the capital punishment thread doesn't end soon I may consider topping myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...