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Can I burn solid fuel on my woodburner?


Pampam

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I burn anything on mine.

 

In my view the very name "Woodburner" has a sort of 'country feeling' about it and is attractive in a catchy kind of way.

 

Its main purpose (being closed in) as opposed to an open fire is to prevent miniature explosions and sparks (from the burning wood) setting your house on fire.

 

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Hi Pam..

Being overly simplistic..a "mulifuel" stove(for wood and "coal" etc)has a similar arrangement to an open fire, in that they have a grate(with an ash pan beneath) on which the fuel is burnt..

 

A basic woodburner...doesn't usually have this grate ,as wood burns with just "top air", so it can just be sat on the "floor" of the stove.("Coal" really needs air to flow from below, hence the grate...)

 

Having said that, a lot of woodburning stoves that I came across when I was fitting them, were able to be retro-fitted with a "mulitfuel conversion kit" anyway(...basically a fancy name for a grate and an ash pan ;-))

 

(However, there are some that are just "dedicated" woodburners and therefore don't have any lower venting, nor access for an ash pan) ..So even if you fitted a grate, the lack of low air(either by vents or by cracking open the ash pan flap), makes burning "coal" hard going....

 

Hope that's helpful...

 

Edit Sorry Peter..I jumped in and posted without checking out your link.... :$ :-S

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Guest pelmetman

Although I get free wood from the pelmet making we still went for the multi fuel as we were restricted on space where it had to go, and I knew we'd struggle to keep it in over night with wood alone due to it being so small............We use boiler nuts as they don't leave any clinker behind ;-).......

 

As an aside we had lunch at a pub the other day, and they had put a standard fire grate in their large log burner in order to burn coal..... seem to work OK :D.......

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Now i may be wrong but does not the burning of any carbon based fuel produce various carbon gases, which i thought we were all be exhorted to stop doing? After all why shut down a coal fired power station that is powering thousands of homes merely because it produces carbon gases and then to have each home replacing it. Do all these flues have scrubbers fitted??

 

Seems a bit daft to me.

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Dave225 - 2013-12-13 4:34 PM

 

Now i may be wrong but does not the burning of any carbon based fuel produce various carbon gases, which i thought we were all be exhorted to stop doing? After all why shut down a coal fired power station that is powering thousands of homes merely because it produces carbon gases and then to have each home replacing it. Do all these flues have scrubbers fitted??

 

Seems a bit daft to me.

 

And driving around the country and rest of europe like most do on here is ok ?

 

 

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Guest pelmetman
Pampam - 2013-12-13 6:25 PM

 

Mines got an ashpan underneath I was going to try a smokeless fuel called homefire which is compressed coal dust :)pp to see if I stick it on it keeps in overnight but didn't want to be "monoxided "in the night :)pp

 

Get a carbon monoxide alarm ;-)............ours has gone off on a few occasions usually early morning when the wind has changed or I didn't set the vent right *-)..............the alarms are very sensitive, as the one we have in Horace went off a couple of times today, whilst having its service and some other work done in the garage........its got our mechanic wondering what he's been breathing for years :-S.........

 

PS I wouldn't bother with the homefire stuff as it doesn't give out enough heat.............try Extra heat from your local coal merchant less than £10 for a 25kg bag ;-).................we use 2 bags a week 8-) .............but ours is alight 24 hours a day at this time of year.............one must do our bit for global warming :D

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antony1969 - 2013-12-13 5:12 PM

 

Dave225 - 2013-12-13 4:34 PM

 

Now i may be wrong but does not the burning of any carbon based fuel produce various carbon gases, which i thought we were all be exhorted to stop doing? After all why shut down a coal fired power station that is powering thousands of homes merely because it produces carbon gases and then to have each home replacing it. Do all these flues have scrubbers fitted??

 

Seems a bit daft to me.

 

And driving around the country and rest of europe like most do on here is ok ?

 

 

Don't know about you but i take the bus most of the time so am sharing the pollution output with others. Now that does also include the inside of the bus as some definitely need a little bit of control with the aftershave. and that is just the women.

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pelmetman - 2013-12-13 6:42 PM

 

Pampam - 2013-12-13 6:25 PM

 

Mines got an ashpan underneath I was going to try a smokeless fuel called homefire which is compressed coal dust :)pp to see if I stick it on it keeps in overnight but didn't want to be "monoxided "in the night :)pp

 

Get a carbon monoxide alarm ;-)............ours has gone off on a few occasions usually early morning when the wind has changed or I didn't set the vent right *-)..............the alarms are very sensitive, as the one we have in Horace went off a couple of times today, whilst having its service and some other work done in the garage........its got our mechanic wondering what he's been breathing for years :-S.........

 

PS I wouldn't bother with the homefire stuff as it doesn't give out enough heat.............try Extra heat from your local coal merchant less than £10 for a 25kg bag ;-).................we use 2 bags a week 8-) .............but ours is alight 24 hours a day at this time of year.............one must do our bit for global warming :D

 

Homefire is proboly the best fuel out there, whilst I know it's expensive it pays back in heat output and overnight burning, BUT, some manufacturers don't recommend it, I think because of the sulphur content.

A CO alarm possibly saved my life when our multifuel stove reverse flowed.

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Dave225 - 2013-12-13 5:34 PMNow i may be wrong but does not the burning of any carbon based fuel produce various carbon gases, which i thought we were all be exhorted to stop doing? After all why shut down a coal fired power station that is powering thousands of homes merely because it produces carbon gases and then to have each home replacing it. Do all these flues have scrubbers fitted??Seems a bit daft to me.

 

But a Wood burner is carbon neutral, you grow it, you burn it ad inf so you are not using fossil fuels and are contributing (via a managed forestry scheme) to an improved landscape at the same time.

 

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Retread

 

A log of wood contains a number of carbon elements, whatever you do with that log doesn't cause the carbon elements to vanish, they may well join onto other carbon free elements and become a different molecule but they are always present in whatever form they decide to become.

 

When the tree cutter removed the tree he also caused a high number of carbon atoms the become freed from the earth and even when he cut the branches into logs the sap that ran out also contained carbon atoms that escaped to join others in the atmosphere.

 

And what about the poor old Woodcutter sweating buckets of moisture pardon me, carbon atoms

 

Sorry but there aint no escaping free carbon. It may well settle in the clouds again as CO2 then fall as water, and so the evolutionary cycle begins again, up the tree etc.

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Will85 - 2013-12-14 8:15 PMRetreadA log of wood contains a number of carbon elements, whatever you do with that log doesn't cause the carbon elements to vanish, they may well join onto other carbon free elements and become a different molecule but they are always present in whatever form they decide to become.When the tree cutter removed the tree he also caused a high number of carbon atoms the become freed from the earth and even when he cut the branches into logs the sap that ran out also contained carbon atoms that escaped to join others in the atmosphere.And what about the poor old Woodcutter sweating buckets of moisture pardon me, carbon atomsSorry but there aint no escaping free carbon. It may well settle in the clouds again as CO2 then fall as water.

 

You are missing the point, whether there is an infinite no of carbon atoms in a tree is irrelevant, the point is that the tree is not a fossil fuel ie fossilised tree, so by growing a tree or better still several you lock up the co2 and produce wood which is then burnt to produce more tree food a process called photosynthsis that is what is meant by carbon neutral for your information and education some reading is available here

 

 

 

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Wonderful. 1. Then what happens to the free carbon atoms when released as in a fire 2. Then what's all this fuss about carbon in the atmosphere? 3..so when I have a bonfire and burn brambles and bits of wood which are only tree wood in a different guise, and the neighbours complain I can say its all OK its not a fossil fuel? 4. My pal in QLD recently almost lost his house in wild fires, all that carbon released goes where then?
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Will85 - 2013-12-15 11:21 AM

2. Then what's all this fuss about carbon in the atmosphere?

 

Just a guess...

but I would "assume" that it may be because the burning of "fossil fuels" is releasing a far greater quantity of carbon, than would normally be present in the atmosphere at any one period in time..?

(Carbon that has been accumulated over millions of years, is being released in a just a few decades)

 

..sounds plausible...?

 

(..well,plausible enough for "Bickerbox" anyway! (lol) )

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Will, Retread is right. Fossil fuels, coal, oil and natural gas, contain old carbon that has been locked out of the carbon cycle (see here for a Wiki: http://tinyurl.com/pturu ) for millenia. When these fuels are burned the old carbon is released to the atmosphere, adding to existing carbon. It is these fuels alone, that took carbon from the atmosphere in geological time and have since been locked away, that are thought to do the climate changing damage.

 

Existing carbon (in whatever form) is merely re-cycled from one form to another, but adds nothing new to the atmosphere. When a tree falls and decays naturally it releases its carbon as it does when burned, but new growth re-absorbs that carbon. This process lies behind the idea that planting trees can help offset the effects of deforestation and burning fossil fuels.

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As mentioned above a bottom grate/grid allows for a higher airflow to allow better burning for coal type products, but if this is not fitted then watch that the higher heat from the coal as opposed to wood does not burn out the bottom of the fire box. Some of the cheaper smaller stoves are made of quite thin metal

 

You should be ok if the bottom is lined with fire bricks.

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Understood, but gasses are escaping from faults on the oceans seabeds plus plenty of volcanic action all the time and I'll bet they're equal if not more than natural carbon escapees. Anyway if a tree is removed there's lots of escaping gasses in the earth surrounding. However I'm still of the opinion that its a lot is hype to increas taxes.

 

I doubt it could ever be accurately measured.

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Guest 1footinthegrave

Resources Institute (WRI) has identified 1,200 coal plants in planning across 59 countries, with about three-quarters in China and India. The capacity of the new plants add up to 1,400GW to global greenhouse gas emissions, the equivalent of adding another China – the world's biggest emitter. India is planning 455 new plants compared to 363 in China ;-)

 

I think I'll have my garden bonfire after all. :-S

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Just had another thought which cocks this whole menagerie of carbon atoms right up the creek!

 

Cut a large tree down fine, lets say it contains 1,000 carbon atoms. The wood burner does its job and the 1,000 atoms are released and are floating around looking for a suitable tree home, good everyone is happy.

 

That large old tree is replaced by a newly planted and 'excedingly small' sapling that requires 10 carbon atoms. What happens to the remaining 990 ?

 

Its going to take an almighty number of years before that 1,000 find a home. What then ?

 

And what about the wood burner itself, it was made from carbon, mangaanese, silicon, phosphorous, etc that all came from the earth and were treated in a Bessemer furnace no doubt where all those nasty earthly gasses were chucked out causing mayhem in the Welsh Valleys. All to burn a so called friendly wood burner.

 

Come come Gentlemen there a little more to this than a simple envonmetally efficient wood burner.

 

I rest my case.

 

PS, it has been said in the past that the USA also adds to the emision problems. I visited a steel foundry in Syracuse some years ago where they were pround to explain that their gas flues above the foundries were fitted with smoke and fume catching devises. The results were weighed and recorded.

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