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First time trip to Greece in our Auto-Sleepers Nuevo 2.


AJ46

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We did that trip some years ago ,great trip  fantastic views as you sail out of Venice, we did it later in the year  August -October so camp sites were shut  and we wild camped all the time, no problems, shops water  toilet dumps freely available . I believe Greece has got more expensive  nowadays but hey ho a great experience.
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Hi AJ46.

We are doing a similar trip but we are going Ancona – Patras and then eventually Igoumenitsa – Venice. Really looking forward to it.

 

I suggest you stay in touch with whoever you booked your ferry through. We had a call from Viamare a couple of days ago to say that our early May sailing, Ancona – Patras had been cancelled. We are currently awaiting an offer of another date. If all else fails we will go overland and then, hopefully, return via Venice.

 

Cattwg :-D

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We hope to use a mix of campsites, aires and wild camping places in Greece, I have compiled lists of these. I’d be happy to e-mail them to you if they would be of use. The only proviso being that we have no personal experience of any of them; first time to Greece.

Cattwg :-D

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Thanks Cattwg, we are travelling with ANEK Superfast and so far so good all still on!! Like you, we are using a mix of campsites-camperstops and wild camps. Do you know if an International driving licence is a requirement? Also I believe that our little dog will have to be muzzled but our dog will not like that!! We should arrive at Patros Monday 4th May
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Went last year ,no international driving license needed .Be careful there were a lot of NO Wild Camping signs around and being enforced.

 

We arrive in Patras on 5th May a lot of sites only just opening ,used ASCI card a lot .Fuel was cheapest we had seen ,after filling up in Germany was really surprised at cost £1.19 euro a litre in Patra last year .If you want anymore info PM me .

 

 

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We have travelled extensively through Italy and lived in Greece for many years with our Labrador and we have never had to have him muzzled although we always had a soft muzzle with us. No Italian ever had their dog muzzled and they seem to love dogs. Greeks are a bit frightened of dogs as most of theirs are tied up outside and used as guard dogs even little ones. Be careful of wild camping on the Peloponnese as at the start of the season the Police enforce the no wild camping law religiously but as it gets hotter they cannot be bothered. Plenty of tavernas will let you park overnight but we struggled in May with wild camping. A few Germans were jailed for wild camping. The ferry companies usually have a tie up with a group of campsites offering discounts and free stays so worth investigating when on board. Have a good trip. Greece is wonderful.
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Hi AJ46,

I was wondering if you were taking your bikes to Greece? We normally would have ours with us but it's a long way to cart them if we then don't use them.

We intend to go/return via Switzerland and we are definitely not Alpine cyclists!

What have others done in the past?

Cattwg :-D

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If you go inland on the Peloponnese, it is quite mountainous. Ditto if north along the borders with Albania, FYROM, and Bulgaria. It will be also liable to get quite hot, so you may find it disagreeable for cycling. If you have the bikes, and conditions are good, you can use them: if you don't take them, you can't. But it is not a generally flat country, which is why it is so spectacular, so expect to find hills even along the coasts.
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Did the trip last Sept., from Trieste as we like to spend time in Germany and Austria on our way down. Do not be without CASH, a lot of the cheaper petrol station ONLY CASH, even some campsites are the same. A few campsites we enjoyed are,

 

Ionion beach. not too far from the port if heading south, a safe introduction to Greece, not the cheapest, you can also bike to the local village.

Camping Thines at Finikounta, next to the sea and stroll or bike ride from the village.

Camping Delphi for the ruins, nice walk from the site to Delphi.

Camping Kastraki, the only place to see the Meteora

Finally a really lovely site, Camping Sikia near Volos, biked most days in the direction of Volos for food and to strech the legs. Ps. bus to Volos stops nearby for a days shopping .

 

Have a great time chris.

 

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Thank you Guy's for your input so far.

We have put a box on the bike rack which has proved better for us. My wife is not the best on a bike!! But the box carries lots of stuff leaving the lockers clear for all sorts of goodies.

Our first trip will be to focus on the Peloponnese area of Greece.

We will carry a soft muzzle for our little Mutley as he does not like the Police and really shows aggression to them!! He got me off the hook a couple of years back when the Police stopped us at around midnight.

Really looking forward to the sea journey from Italy to Patras as when in the past driving near to the coast of Croatia we found it very difficult getting to many coastal parts, so at least we should get a chance with our binoculars.

Last year we were on the island of Sicily during the months of May & June and we found it extremely windy during May. Is it windy in Greece during May?

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Was windy on ferry from Venice to Patras,made it interesting trying to sleep in van at night,Very mixed weather early to Mid May on Peloponnese,if fact local said its was the worse spring in many a year.

 

Being next to open slots on boat when camping on board looks good ,but it does get very windy ,coming back we got into middle lane and it was much more protected.

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Once again thanks for all you input. Looking forward to getting away on this trip and hope that the ferry company does not let us down!! We have however, got our insurance set up in case we end up having to drive all the way!! I know that I have already mentioned this in a previous thread but to repeat that if you have ADAC breakdown cover, you can get a very large discount on your crossing cost, in fact, the discount we got was more than the annual premium for our 2 person super cover!!
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Sounds a great trip, envy you!. It will probably be windy in some of the places, as Greece is a great sailing area, and we have been fortunate to sail in many greek waters, and to to most of the islands. Make sure you take a Greek phrase book with you, as a lot of the villages will not speak English, unless it's chaged since we where last there!

Enjoy your wonderful trip. Hope some of you will make a diary and let us all know about it

PJay

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Enjoy your trip. One small caveat. Do not come out of Greece with a lot of euros. Remember Greece prints it own euros and if they do go bust, then other EU countries will be unhappy to accept them. If nothing happens then there will be no problem, but who knows these days. If you take euros in, then these are fine anywhere, and of course the Greeks will love ot have them. You can tell by the letters in the numbering on each note. Greek euro notes have the letter 'Y'
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Dave has a point, though I think it is mainly the Germans who have a problem with Greek printed Euro notes. There is some dispute over quite how bust Greece already is, as no-one (except possibly Goldman Sachs! :-)) seems able to get verifiable figures - which is how they got into this mess in the first place. My take, at present, is that they are already bust, which is why they keep having to be bailed out. Were they not, I don't understand what the bailouts are for. Borrowing to pay your debts is not exactly a sign of solvency!

 

A bigger risk, in terms of possible consequences, is if Greece falls out of the Euro. I'd try to keep a sharp eye on the news for developments while there. Should "Grexit" happen, I think it may be wisest to just cut your losses and get out as quickly as possible. The banks would probably have to close until an alternative currency could be printed and distributed (days or weeks?), so exchange would be pretty much impossible. Euros would still have to be used within Greece (they'd have nothing else), but I'd suspect card transactions would be suspended and cash machines would cease distributing cash. Since Greece isn't an oil producer, I think there'd soon be a run on filling stations as folk began to realise that what was in-country would be all they would have until the new currency had been introduced and stabilised. In short, widespread chaos with many normal activities suspended.

 

I think I'd just fill the tank, pay my outstanding bills, and head straight for the nearest border with Bulgaria as soon as I heard - irrespective of whether I had a return ticket across the Adriatic.

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Brian Kirby - 2015-04-09 6:59 PM

 

Dave has a point, though I think it is mainly the Germans who have a problem with Greek printed Euro notes. There is some dispute over quite how bust Greece already is, as no-one (except possibly Goldman Sachs! :-)) seems able to get verifiable figures - which is how they got into this mess in the first place. My take, at present, is that they are already bust, which is why they keep having to be bailed out. Were they not, I don't understand what the bailouts are for. Borrowing to pay your debts is not exactly a sign of solvency!

 

A bigger risk, in terms of possible consequences, is if Greece falls out of the Euro. I'd try to keep a sharp eye on the news for developments while there. Should "Grexit" happen, I think it may be wisest to just cut your losses and get out as quickly as possible. The banks would probably have to close until an alternative currency could be printed and distributed (days or weeks?), so exchange would be pretty much impossible. Euros would still have to be used within Greece (they'd have nothing else), but I'd suspect card transactions would be suspended and cash machines would cease distributing cash. Since Greece isn't an oil producer, I think there'd soon be a run on filling stations as folk began to realise that what was in-country would be all they would have until the new currency had been introduced and stabilised. In short, widespread chaos with many normal activities suspended.

 

I think I'd just fill the tank, pay my outstanding bills, and head straight for the nearest border with Bulgaria as soon as I heard - irrespective of whether I had a return ticket across the Adriatic.

 

 

All true but.............

 

I doubt there is a solvent country in the western world these days. After all France is about bust, even the UK has debts of £1 trillion and rising, so the definition of solvency is a bit vague. We currently have a situation here where one Party is desperate to clear our deficit where as the other seems to think a bit of debt is not a problem.

 

Where the issue with Greece arises is civil unrest in the event of some form of financial breakdown.Will that happen? I do not know but I have a suspicion that the EU will not allow it to happen, even if it costs them. I know Germany wants to play hardball, but others fear the consequences especially if it allows Putin into Europe by the back door. Plus one has to remember it is not just Greece, If they fall then immediately Cyprus follows as it is indebted to Greece far too much, Italy will suffer very badly as it also holds huge Greek debt plus other EU nations, including us, are on the line as well, so..........I suspect the usual EU fudge at the end of the day. This is what happens when you try to make one size fit all.

 

What was the old adage??? If you owe the bank a £100 then they will chase you to the ends of the earth, if you owe £1 trillion then they will re arrange your loan.

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Once again, thanks for your input. Years ago I thought, by us all uniting into one big Europe would solve lots of issues, but instead it seems to have created many more!! I did think it wise to be ready just in case we have to get out of Greece. Although we do not normally carry much Euro cash and rely on the Caxton card, maybe this trip we should think differently.
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Think differently? But how much differently? Caxton card is presumably in Euro, so no problems outside Greece if a problem arises.

 

I suspect Dave is right, and Greece won't be forced out, but no-one seems to have a clear view. Plan for the worst and hope for the best is all I'm suggesting. Keep an eye on the news while there, and move sharpish if exit is reported.

 

My main point was that chaos seems likely to ensue, and I wouldn't be that surprised if there were some repercussions on the ferries as a lot, if not all, are Greek owned. Hence get out overland. Don't let your tank get too low, and keep enough cash for at least one fill in your back pocket. If it happens you can then go elsewhere with minimal difficulty. So, plan B sorted.

 

If it all blows over, as seems as likely as not, nothing to lose. Just enjoy the trip. We did! :-)

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Again I think we are being all probably a bit melodramatic. Even during the last few years when bluntly Greece was facing major financial difficulties, and people were literally starving in Athens, outwith that city things were pretty much as normal. There have been no reports that I know of, of tourists being mugged in the streets or vehicles being hijacked, so even if a Grexit was to occur, iI suspect things would be reasonable. In fact things may even get better because if the Drachma was re - introduced, its value would drop so as an expat, your money would go further. They also wish to encourage tourists so you may find the welcome even better than before.

 

I suspoect you have more chance of being mugged in France or even here in the UK. However, things like medical care may be in short supply as money is tight, so carry all medecines you need and have good insurance. It may also be a good idea to take the Angela Merkel picture off the van???????

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Eh? Where did mugging come into the equation, Dave? I'm talking chaos in the finanial system, not riots on the streets!

 

If you can't get money, and your cards won't work, it just seems likely to put a bit of a dampener on your holiday. So I'm suggesting maintaining awareness, and a strategy for exiting under those circumstances, should they arise.

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