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Missing Jacking kit


Bailey

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I'm guessing your Roadcamp will be like our Campscout and have Electrobloc under one seat and leisure bat under other?

For our van the jacking kit was just put loose in back of van, which may well be why yours has gone missing. You've just reminded me, just before going of on long haul I purchased a canvas bag so I could store the jacking kit components in a small unused cupboard we have at rear, I'm just off to do that this afternoon before I forget.

p.s. if you don't know, the jacking kit is in a fairly large moulded plastic box, at a guess 24"x18"x8".

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Bailey - 2015-04-03 11:18 AM

 

Mine is LHD too but it's not under the seats. Hopefully the dealer I bought it from will come up trumps. He's contacting the original owner today. Thanks anyway.

 

Sounds like it is a large box, so maybe why previous owner took it out! Have to say, would you use the jack? Call out a repairer! We have never needed ours in 9 years of traveling Buy a puncture repair spray, for emergencies.

PJay

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The box on mine was moulded to slide under a seat, but with a battery under one and the electric block under the other it was just shoved in the garage. They are standard white van equipment so you could pick one up at a breakers. The inflation kit was fitted in the driver's door pocket with foam inserts.
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PJay - 2015-04-03 3:12 PM

 

Bailey - 2015-04-03 11:18 AM

 

Mine is LHD too but it's not under the seats. Hopefully the dealer I bought it from will come up trumps. He's contacting the original owner today. Thanks anyway.

 

Sounds like it is a large box, so maybe why previous owner took it out! Have to say, would you use the jack? Call out a repairer! We have never needed ours in 9 years of traveling Buy a puncture repair spray, for emergencies.

PJay

 

No spare wheel & tools to change it, €1000 fine in Spain. (lol)

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Guest Joe90
Billggski - 2015-04-03 7:44 PM

 

"Or a tyre repair kit"

 

Which will do the job just fine with a blowout. :D or a lump of shrapnel like material. :D

 

Or you could just buy say a 6 ton bottle jack and throw the pitiful Fiat offering, if you ever find it, straight in the bin where it belongs

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Bailey - 2015-04-03 10:08 AM

 

Anyone know where the jacking kit would stored in a 2009 Fiat Ducato M/H. It's a Possl Roadcamp van and 5.44m long. I think I've tried everywhere.

 

Usually in a big plastic box under the front passenger seat unless something else has been put there?

 

Unless you don't have a spare wheel in which case you often don't get a jack either?

 

The box is needlessly bulky but it is removable and would have contained the jack, wheel brace, towing eye and screwdriver.

 

If you have locking wheel nits there should also be a socket that fits them and without this you would be unable to remove a wheel so it is crucial to have it.

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Billggski - 2015-04-03 7:44 PM

 

"Or a tyre repair kit"

 

For a car yes, but Motorhome come under special vehicle category M1 according to " INSTRUCTION 08/V-74 FROM THE SPANISH DIRECTOR GENERAL OF TRAFFIC RELATIVE TO MOTORHOMES" and they have to carry a spare & tools to change it.

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lennyhb - 2015-04-04 8:52 AM

 

Billggski - 2015-04-03 7:44 PM

 

"Or a tyre repair kit"

 

For a car yes, but Motorhome come under special vehicle category M1 according to " INSTRUCTION 08/V-74 FROM THE SPANISH DIRECTOR GENERAL OF TRAFFIC RELATIVE TO MOTORHOMES" and they have to carry a spare & tools to change it.

 

......"or an alternative system, which offers sufficient guarantee for the mobility of the vehicle".

 

Let the games begin on whether a tyre repair kit meets this definition (I suspect it would if tested in law - but the Spanish can be somewhat "individual" in interpretation ;-)).

 

 

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Robinhood - 2015-04-04 9:09 AM

 

lennyhb - 2015-04-04 8:52 AM

 

Billggski - 2015-04-03 7:44 PM

 

"Or a tyre repair kit"

 

For a car yes, but Motorhome come under special vehicle category M1 according to " INSTRUCTION 08/V-74 FROM THE SPANISH DIRECTOR GENERAL OF TRAFFIC RELATIVE TO MOTORHOMES" and they have to carry a spare & tools to change it.

 

......"or an alternative system, which offers sufficient guarantee for the mobility of the vehicle".

 

Let the games begin on whether a tyre repair kit meets this definition (I suspect it would if tested in law - but the Spanish can be somewhat "individual" in interpretation ;-)).

 

 

OR "A" Framing!!!!!

 

Pete

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Robinhood - 2015-04-04 9:09 AM

 

lennyhb - 2015-04-04 8:52 AM

 

Billggski - 2015-04-03 7:44 PM

 

"Or a tyre repair kit"

 

For a car yes, but Motorhome come under special vehicle category M1 according to " INSTRUCTION 08/V-74 FROM THE SPANISH DIRECTOR GENERAL OF TRAFFIC RELATIVE TO MOTORHOMES" and they have to carry a spare & tools to change it.

 

......"or an alternative system, which offers sufficient guarantee for the mobility of the vehicle".

 

Let the games begin on whether a tyre repair kit meets this definition (I suspect it would if tested in law - but the Spanish can be somewhat "individual" in interpretation ;-)).

 

 

Are you feeling lucky :D :D :D

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Robinhood - 2015-04-04 9:09 AM

 

lennyhb - 2015-04-04 8:52 AM

 

Billggski - 2015-04-03 7:44 PM

 

"Or a tyre repair kit"

 

For a car yes, but Motorhome come under special vehicle category M1 according to " INSTRUCTION 08/V-74 FROM THE SPANISH DIRECTOR GENERAL OF TRAFFIC RELATIVE TO MOTORHOMES" and they have to carry a spare & tools to change it.

 

......"or an alternative system, which offers sufficient guarantee for the mobility of the vehicle".

 

Let the games begin on whether a tyre repair kit meets this definition (I suspect it would if tested in law - but the Spanish can be somewhat "individual" in interpretation ;-)).

 

 

The alternative system is a tricky one. Clearly, if you were to be stopped and you had a repair kit you could argue that this was the alternative. But if you shredded a tyre and you were stuck then the police could rightly point out that the system did not offer sufficient guarantee.

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Muswell - 2015-04-04 11:00 AM

 

The alternative system is a tricky one. Clearly, if you were to be stopped and you had a repair kit you could argue that this was the alternative. But if you shredded a tyre and you were stuck then the police could rightly point out that the system did not offer sufficient guarantee.

 

...I can't say I disagree, but it is all a matter of degree.

 

A spare wheel is of no use if you have two punctures at the same time (I have a friend who had exactly that, AND destroyed two wheels at the same time, by running over a baulk of wood).

 

My response wasn't entirely unadvised, however. I can find current Spanish motorcaravan pricelists which list the spare wheel as an option, so I suspect the "Fix and Go" kits are seen (at least by some in the trade) as acceptable.

 

 

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The Spanish ‘Instruction’ mentioned by lennyhb is dated January 28, 2008.

 

It would need to be confirmed whether the advice in the instruction was valid in the first case - for instance I believe the Spanish ‘TWO warning triangles rule’ has only ever applied to Spanish residents - and whether what was valid in 2008 is still valid now. For example, the stated requirement that “...One set of replacement light bulbs, in prime condition and the necessary tools to change the light bulbs...” be carried in a vehicle is no longer in force.

 

There’s also the matter of the wording. "The minimum equipment which a motorhome SHOULD carry...” is not the same as "The minimum equipment which a motorhome MUST carry...” The former statement implies that carrying the equipment would be advisable but not obligatory, while the latter statement insists that the equipment be carried. What if someone chooses to take the wording literally and carry a spare wheel without a tyre fitted to it? Or is it OK to carry a spare tyre but not a spare wheel?

 

Guessing at how a Spanish policeman might react if a motorhome were immobilised following damage to a wheel/tyre is never going to be productive.

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Derek Uzzell - 2015-04-04 1:50 PM

 

The Spanish ‘Instruction’ mentioned by lennyhb is dated January 28, 2008.

 

It would need to be confirmed whether the advice in the instruction was valid in the first case - for instance I believe the Spanish ‘TWO warning triangles rule’ has only ever applied to Spanish residents - and whether what was valid in 2008 is still valid now. For example, the stated requirement that “...One set of replacement light bulbs, in prime condition and the necessary tools to change the light bulbs...” be carried in a vehicle is no longer in force.

 

There’s also the matter of the wording. "The minimum equipment which a motorhome SHOULD carry...” is not the same as "The minimum equipment which a motorhome MUST carry...” The former statement implies that carrying the equipment would be advisable but not obligatory, while the latter statement insists that the equipment be carried. What if someone chooses to take the wording literally and carry a spare wheel without a tyre fitted to it? Or is it OK to carry a spare tyre but not a spare wheel?

 

Guessing at how a Spanish policeman might react if a motorhome were immobilised following damage to a wheel/tyre is never going to be productive.

 

The instruccion is in Spanish , not English. "Deben llevar" IMO means must carry, if not it would probably have been phrased differenty.This is reinforced later by the same usage when referring to wearing a high-vis waistcoat. I should imagine that a Spanish policeman would go by the instruccion and not pay too much attention to a foreigner's interpretation of a translation :-D

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The original instruction may be in Spanish, but the version lennyhb referred to (and that was subsequently discussed here) is in English. The Spanish version is here

 

http://static.desnivel.com/docs/2012/12/04/03-dgt-instruccion-08-v-74-autocaravanas.pdf

 

While I freely admit to nit-picking over semantics, what I said about the validity and currency of the advice still stands. The requirement for

 

“...una rueda de repuesto o una rueda temporal con las herramientas necesarias para e cambio de ruedas o sistema alternativo para el cambio de las mismas que ofrezca suficientes garantías para la movilidad del vehículo”

 

is as ‘loose’ a definition in Spanish as in English where the “sistema alternativo” is concerned.

 

Also, if one moves down to the "6.- INSPECCIÓN TÉCNICA” section, it’s plain that the target audience for the instruction (and hence the earlier reference to two warning triangles) is Spanish motorcaravanners.

 

It’s not really a question of whether a Spanish policeman would quibble over the English translation, but what the term “sistema alternativo” can cover. Clearly if a motorhome is carrying an appropriate spare wheel/tyre that can be fitted in the event of a wheel/tyre being damaged and the tools needed to carry out that task, this would comply with the Spanish instruction.

 

It seems reasonable to me that a motorhome with no spare wheel/tyre, but with a ‘Fix-and-Go’ kit, would also be considered to comply. Whether a Spanish policeman (irrespective of the 2008 instruction being in Spanish or English) might feel differently is pure guesswork, but as these kits are now commonplace in vehicles and credible organisations

 

http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/touring_tips/spain.pdf

 

advise that ‘kits’ are acceptable when travelling in Spain, I believe it’s more probable than not that a Spanish policeman would conclude that a repair kit offers the "suficientes garantías” referred to in the instruction.

 

(It’s very evident from a cursory GOOGLE search that Spanish motoring law in this respect has been argued over many times but with no firm resolution. It should not be impossible to obtain a definitive answer regarding the motorhome tyre repair kit question, but I’ve seen no indication that anyone has bothered to seek one.)

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Derek Uzzell - 2015-04-05 8:37 AM

 

The original instruction may be in Spanish, but the version lennyhb referred to (and that was subsequently discussed here) is in English. The Spanish version is here

 

http://static.desnivel.com/docs/2012/12/04/03-dgt-instruccion-08-v-74-autocaravanas.pdf

 

While I freely admit to nit-picking over semantics, what I said about the validity and currency of the advice still stands. The requirement for

 

“...una rueda de repuesto o una rueda temporal con las herramientas necesarias para e cambio de ruedas o sistema alternativo para el cambio de las mismas que ofrezca suficientes garantías para la movilidad del vehículo”

 

is as ‘loose’ a definition in Spanish as in English where the “sistema alternativo” is concerned.

 

Also, if one moves down to the "6.- INSPECCIÓN TÉCNICA” section, it’s plain that the target audience for the instruction (and hence the earlier reference to two warning triangles) is Spanish motorcaravanners.

 

It’s not really a question of whether a Spanish policeman would quibble over the English translation, but what the term “sistema alternativo” can cover. Clearly if a motorhome is carrying an appropriate spare wheel/tyre that can be fitted in the event of a wheel/tyre being damaged and the tools needed to carry out that task, this would comply with the Spanish instruction.

 

It seems reasonable to me that a motorhome with no spare wheel/tyre, but with a ‘Fix-and-Go’ kit, would also be considered to comply. Whether a Spanish policeman (irrespective of the 2008 instruction being in Spanish or English) might feel differently is pure guesswork, but as these kits are now commonplace in vehicles and credible organisations

 

http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/touring_tips/spain.pdf

 

advise that ‘kits’ are acceptable when travelling in Spain, I believe it’s more probable than not that a Spanish policeman would conclude that a repair kit offers the "suficientes garantías” referred to in the instruction.

 

(It’s very evident from a cursory GOOGLE search that Spanish motoring law in this respect has been argued over many times but with no firm resolution. It should not be impossible to obtain a definitive answer regarding the motorhome tyre repair kit question, but I’ve seen no indication that anyone has bothered to seek one.)

 

I think you missed my point. I wasn't writing about the kits but your distinction between should and must. :-D

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Hi

 

Spanish Police interpretation of any law appears to be (to put it kindly) "flexible"!! In fact They appear to interpret just about everytthing in some very strange ways.!!!.

 

For Years they ignored us "A" framing.Then almost overnight more and more where getting "pulled" and told to unhitch, and in a couple of cases even Fined. (both overturned on appeal). My own experience through the late 90`s and early 00`s, was that the Local Policia where more inclined to the "Nelsonian" whilst the Guardia, could be real sticklers! Before we packed up going each winter, I got pulled 3 times by the Guardia, each time on a Sunday and each time by Motorcycle cops.!!.

 

It will likely be the same over the "interpretation" of the use of emergency Wheels and the "Fix-a-flat" devices. some will. some won`t. The Spanish, although individually nice people, are a "law unto themselves". As we found out when they fished right up to the beach, ignoring conservation area`s!!! off the Western Approaches..

 

 

Pete

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