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1940s weekends


markymark

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I was looking forward to going to the pickering 1940's weekend too , (was looking forward too getting glammed up ) but now cant make it ,so if anyone knows of anymore i would be interested too , havent been to one yet and thought it might be a bit of a laugh altho it does look very busy :) cheers pp
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Ah yes agd if youve lived thru it i dont suppose its much fun to revisit but i was born in '56 so its more fascinating for me to be a time travellor and see how my parents lived etc anyhoow i might bump i to michael kitchen (foyles war ) lol cheers pp :)
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markymark - 2015-10-11 8:46 PM

 

starvin marvin - 2015-10-11 4:38 AM

 

Just wait long enough and our darling Dave will have us all back there.

 

sory dont understand what you mean lol ?

 

You'll have to go back through a lot of threads Mark to understand but basically there's an old geezer on here who promote's old things.....pre 1990's

Dave

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Amen to that, but I was just being flippant. I have no doubt that for my parents it was a time of horror and dread, but as a small boy there was no horror. Our extended family made it through the war with no deaths or serious injury, no prisoners of war, no one was bombed out, so for me the air raid sirens meant down to the shelter and Nan's homemade biscuits, going to school next morning and finding bits of shrapnel, standing in the garden and watching Spitfires and Hurricanes chasing German planes and shooting at them,I swear we saw smoke come from some of them. Because of the ration system we were probably better fed than we were before the war, and by the time I was old enough to start to understand anything, the Yanks had opted in, and there was an optimism.

After VJ Day the men came home, the Labour Government was in power, telling us that we had finally arrived in the land fit for hero's, and we would never want for anything again in our new Socialist Valhalla, funny thing is, some people still think that will happen.

So there it is, for me the 40's were not bad, I still like the music, I still like omelets made from Egg powder, I still like corned beef, I still like porridge for breakfast, I still have the same hair cut as I did back then. I wish that our children and grandchildren could enjoy the same innocence that we did, that we could all enjoy free healthcare as we did, and that social mobility was really as good now as it was then, but the TV was rubbish.

Then we moved into the 50's, rock and roll, pasteurised chilled and filtered lager instead of proper beer and ale, Little Chef cafes, lovely motorbikes, but best of all, dancing with pretty girls who didn't seem to mind if you held them tight and close when you danced. Oh, I nearly forgot, National Service with a load of other blokes, in my case spent mostly in Central London.

AGD

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Guest pelmetman
nowtelse2do - 2015-10-12 10:19 AM

 

markymark - 2015-10-11 8:46 PM

 

starvin marvin - 2015-10-11 4:38 AM

 

Just wait long enough and our darling Dave will have us all back there.

 

sory dont understand what you mean lol ?

 

You'll have to go back through a lot of threads Mark to understand but basically there's an old geezer on here who promote's old things.....pre 1990's

Dave

 

Can't mean me ;-) ............

 

As I'm a mere sprog compared to most of the old geezers on here >:-) .........

 

I've still another 9 years before I get paid to be a member of the idle classes :-( ........

 

So I'll have to carry on practicing :D ..........

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

In reality the 1940's were a time of real fear, YES VERY REAL. We were expecting to be invaded. The Blackout was a government order Rationing was a government order. Evacuation was a government order. Conscription was a government order with never returning a great possibility.There was no frivolity about the 1940's at all.

 

Our ships were being sunk every day with a possibility of us being starved. London was being bombed daily. The Battle of Britain was about to start, its outcome unknown. Guns, Balloons, Searchlights, Soldiers, Tanks, Weapons, Vehicles by the hundreds, Deep trenches were being excavated as tank traps, Road signs were removed. Lights on all road vehicles were masked. White was painted on the front and back and sides of all moving vehicles including pushbikes, Air raid shelters were being erected, Bombs were falling, German aircraft were constantly flying low and shooting at anyone not under cover.

 

Our parents only heard of death all around us. It was not good at all. I was nearly thirteen and it never affected me THEN but I'm still smitten with war and "Must Watch" grisly wartime footage. Particularly anything about killing, hanging and the death camps of Belson.

 

Nothing and I repeat nothing scares me now, I've seen it all. It makes death so trivial. I joined the army and leaned to kill people.

 

Modern day 1940's days are a farce. I would never go to one. There was no glory. I never wear a poppy, I never give to any military charities like (I forget) so that shows my interest !

 

Do I regret ....... never I take each day as it is and enjoy life. Have a look at my 'interests' That's the real me !!

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Just like Will and AGD I too lived through it in N London. Due to rationing we where all a lot healthier too.

Queuing for Bananas when they managed to get through,(the ships that is!) people sleeping on bunk beds in the underground stations, balloons over Hendon Aerodrome , now a massive housing estate! I did get evacuated , at one point , lived in a prefab in Cheltenham. 1940's are celebrated in Normandy around June time. I have friends living there that go to the events, they are only youngsters (60) so find it fun.

 

The streets where a lot safer then as well .

 

Can't see the fun in dressing up for it now though

PJay

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PJay - 2015-11-04 10:30 PM

.

Queuing for Bananas when they managed to get through,(the ships that is!)

 

 

PJay

 

 

 

 

The import of bananas was banned until December 1945 and I can remember being given one at Xmas and not knowing how to open it.

 

 

;-)

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First bananas seen and tasted in 1947 aged 9. Had to queue for hours for them (3) and mother cut them in half and prepared them in 6 different ways. Lots of bombs fell near where I lived (Birmingham outskirts) near a railway line. I still flinch and duck from low flying planes. Kids I taught used to laugh when I ducked under my classroom desk every Tuesday when pilots flew jets over the school..
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