Jump to content

condensation advice


lynneroy

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

Wondered if anyone had any suggestions how to solve our problem. We have a fixed bed over garage, and there is a gap around the garage door which is not helping, but this morning our bed was very damp with condensation. The interior of the garage door was streaming, we had noticed mould on one of our chairs stored in the garage, a few weeks ago, but didn't realise the problem was so bad.

 

We really don't want to strip the bed everytime, we really wanted the fixed bed. it is a new motorhome.

we would be grateful for any of your ideas.

 

Lynne

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that advice Vindi, there is quite an air gap round the garage door, so plenty of ventilation from that, also a permanently vented Heki above the bed. We were unsure if it was best to try and seal that gap round the garage door. Also the heating does not have a vent under the bed, would this help or make things worse, if we try to heat the area under the bed.

 

Lynne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The access doors on our garage also had wide gaps around them, even adjusting the hinges etc., did not completely eliminate the draughts (under our 2 single beds), so I bought some draught excluder rolls (white) that were on sale in Aldi, very strong adhesive, which is usually the weak point. It has completely sealed the doors, they still open perfectly easily, but no water ingress or draughts or damp. A very cheap solution.2 years on still working well.

We have access doors to the garage space inside the van, so we always leave one open to allow the warm air inside the van to circulate under the beds and into the garage, it works well even in the depths of winter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Lynne,

 

We have a transverse bed over a garage but do not suffer from your problem. If this helps, our motorhome has Alde heating and it goes around the bottom of the bed and the back wall of the motorhome, so plenty of heat there. On a cold night we also keep the heating on overnight albeit on a low setting (16 - 17 degrees). We also keep the window at the bottom of the bed on breather but the blind is pulled up.

 

Our garage door fits perfectly, so no gaps there. The heating goes into the garage via convection. Our garage doesn't have extra insulation but our motorhome is well insulated.

 

My advice would be to contact your dealer and speak with them as you shouldn't have this problem. Is your motorhome as Swift and was it sold as winterised?

 

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would use draft excluder tape round door, . I use moisture traps in van in winter, you can buy them in most cheap shops 1,25 I paid. Put a few in different areas, you should find this will help. Check bed has a vented base (Slates ) that can also be a cause of damp mattress

PJay

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lynneroy - 2015-11-16 10:19 AM

 

Hi,

 

Wondered if anyone had any suggestions how to solve our problem. We have a fixed bed over garage, and there is a gap around the garage door which is not helping, but this morning our bed was very damp with condensation. The interior of the garage door was streaming, we had noticed mould on one of our chairs stored in the garage, a few weeks ago, but didn't realise the problem was so bad.

 

We really don't want to strip the bed everytime, we really wanted the fixed bed. it is a new motorhome.

we would be grateful for any of your ideas.

 

Lynne

Lynne, I believe your van is a Marquis Majestic 125 (dealer special version of Elddis Autoquest 125), bought December 2014? If so, it will still be under warranty.

Your van is a coachbuilt, with the main garage access via a door in the rear wall, and a secondary access on one side.

Question, was this condensation discovered while you were using the van, or while it was out of use? Condensation should not arise in a van that is unoccupied, even given the recent very wet weather. Your comments regarding the draughts around the rear (presumably?) garage door, and that the inside of the door was streaming with water, strongly suggest to me a badly fitted/sealed garage door with consequent leakage, and not condensation. You will not cure that with any amount of draught excluder. The danger is that if you fit it, it may disguise the underlying problem until real damage is done.

If the van was in use at the time it is possible that, with the wet weather, and possibly showering and cooking - especially if the windows and rooflights had been kept closed - condensation would have formed on colder internal surfaces. However, you have not mentioned excessive condensation on the windscreen or cab windows (almost invariably the worst culprits), nor on the other windows or rooflights (secondary culprits), so I remain to be convinced that the problem is condensation.

Can you please clarify if I have the right van, and what exactly were the circumstances at the time you found this dampness?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Brian, you are correct which Motorhome we have, but now have the 2015 model which we collected in June. We were using the van and the windscreen suffered condensation as well, we used our previous 125 over winter a lot last year but the problem was not so apparent.

I purchased an extra memory foam mattress for this van, and wondered if this had anything to do with it.

It was a very wet and windy night last night, but the garage door did not appear to be leaking, the water was streaming from above the door.

 

When I got home I stripped the bed, turned the mattress over and put a fan heater on in there and it dried out well, I just don't want to have to do that everytime if possible, I love the fixed bed because we use the van every week for one night, and don't get away until late afternoon so it is nice to have the bed made when we arrive.

 

I don't know if it would be possible to extend the heating into the garage, we have 1 vent in the rear of the dinette seat and 1 in the bathroom and don't know how to get across the bathroom into the garage, so perhaps not an option for us, bit I think it would solve the problem.

 

Thanks for your help

Lynne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does the mattress lie on a flat base or on slats? The former is known to cause condensations. Have you got an air gap between the mattress and the walls, again another known cause of condensation? You need an air gap under the mattress and around the sides; if you have it's unlikely condensation caused by the mattress will be the problem.

 

Have you been washing the van with a hose pipe pr pressure washer? I ask because I found water in one of my footwells following a van wash - my fault.

 

The only solution to windscreen condensation is a set of external insulation mats, often called solver screens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a bit mean on vents! we have 5 or 6 on our globecar including 1 in the garage, When we run the Truma Combi all is well, but on the odd occasion we have used electric fire in main area whilst on EHU the garage has got damp, if we used EHU more often I would probably fit a small tube heater in garage.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, the bed is slats, but the mattress does touch the exterior walls and would be very difficult to alter. There is a large metal strip surrounding the garage door, very cold, so perhaps this could do with being covered as well.

Someone mentioned a tube heater in the garage, perhaps that would be a solution for winter,

 

Lynne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back to basics, Lynne! As air gets warmer it can absorb more moisture. The air in an occupied and heated van is almost invariably very humid.

 

When that air meets a cold surface, especially a vertical (ish :-)) surface - say a wall - it cools and begins to sink down that wall, cooling more as it goes. At some point the air will meet its "dew point", which is the temperature at which it is 100% moisture laden, and will begin to shed its moisture in the form of condensation.

 

We exhale a lot of moisture, we perspire all the time, and cooking and washing creates yet more. So plenty to go around, and go around it will inside a relatively confined space like a van.

 

Truma type heaters only raise the air temperature, they do not induce any ventilation, so one of their effects is to raise the relative humidity of the air. Heater off overnight and the air will begin cooling along with the internal surfaces of the external walls and windows.

 

The walls of the van are supposed to be insulated so that the inner surfaces stay relatively warm, much more so than windscreen or cab windows, and more so than the double glazed windows and rooflights. So, the walls should, under normal conditions, remain dry even when the windows etc are running with condensation.

 

Either the humidity in your van was exceptionally high, which on a wet night is possible, or the wall that was "streaming" condensation is not very well insulated (it seems, little better than the windscreen). As condensation formed on windscreen etc, it will have drawn moisture from the air in the van generally, so reducing the likelihood of condensation forming on the inside surface of the warmer, insulated, walls.

 

It may have been a "one off" due to conditions at the time but, if the other walls remained dry and there was only one spot at which this running condensation formed, I would suspect the insulation in that wall is for some reason inadequate.

 

I would add that I am surprised if there is no heater outlet in the garage, as it is good practice to do this. In the absence of any heating at all in the garage, there is no air movement within it, and being low, it will tend to accumulate the very moist, cold air that is sinking down the surrounding walls, and also humidity sinking from the mattress. This will also lead to the under-surface of the mattress becoming relatively cool, with the potential for condensation to form within its thickness. (It also makes for a rather cold bed! :-))

 

So, depending on whether the condensation you were seeing was inside the garage, or on the wall above the bed, it seems possible that the garage is accumulating very moist relatively cool air that, in the absence of any heating to keep the inside surfaces of the external walls warm, condenses on the coldest wall - probably that which has the large access door with its metal frame and added reinforcement within the wall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For almost as long as I've been caravanning/motorhoming, most manufacturers use a board about an inch or two away from the wall so that foam mattresses or seating does not make contact with the external wall. Even my current van has them and supposedly has hot air pumped through the gap when the heater is on. Such boards, and bed slats were designed to reduce condensation. Memory foam is a common cause of condensation - have a look at this

 

http://www.nestbedding.com/blogs/news/6926850-why-is-it-damp-under-my-memory-foam-mattress

 

Bed slats will reduce the condensation from two people sleeping on memory foam. However, if you think the bed is the problem, think about how natural are the fibres in your bedding. In the brochure for my van, it says, "Breathable mattress toppers in the rear assure good ventilation" - in other words, the bed over the garage.

 

Condensation in garages is also common but I'm struggling to understand, as I don't know the model well enough, how that gets into the mattress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...