Jump to content

Filling Gaslow cylinders


aandy

Recommended Posts

I have recently had a Gaslow cylinder fitted. I have only filled it three times so far, once locally and twice in France. On both occasions in France there was a lot of vapour escaping between the nozzle and the filler, sufficient to leave ice down the side of the van. Is this normal, or am I doing something wrong?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm using the correct Gaslow adaptor. I checked both times that it was fully screed in, and the nozzle positively engaged when connected. I even checked the face of the adaptor and the seal on the nozzle for dirt or damage, but all seemed OK.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

O ring is in place and undamaged. I've checked the mating surfaces in the 'cup' of the adaptor and on the fixed filler, both of which are smooth and undamaged. The nozzle on the first occasion did look pretty battered so I initially put it down to that, but to have happened twice suggests otherwise. Both times I removed the nozzle and reinserted it, making sure it locked positively. After filling there was ice on the mating face of the adaptor, which would seem to indicate that the problem is the seal to the nozzle, rather than to the fixed filling point.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a previous poster mentioned, you will get ice forming on the adapter when you release the nozzle. Is this perhaps what you are experiencing ?

 

Perhaps you have been 2x unlucky if gas escaped whilst you were filling in France.

 

It's always advisable to wear substantial gloves when filling to avoid skin burns from the extremely cold gas vapour. This normally only occurs when you release the nozzle but if the nozzle was faulty..... who knows !!!

 

Another area to check is the gas hose connection at the back of the filling point. It could have worked loose and allowing gas to escape - unlikely but a possibility.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions. I 'm pretty sure the filling point itself is OK, as I had no problem when filling in the UK. Not back in France until September, so will have to wait until then to see whether I just got two dodgy nozzles.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I appreciate this will not help in France but it may help others in Spain because we had a lot of problems in Spain with the Spanish Euro type adapter.

 

Ours has - sorry had - a non return valve and I could not get gas to flow on several pumps but after borrowing an adapter without a non return valve it transpired that there was just too much back pressure with the valve also in the UIK filler inlet, and the solution was so easy once I figured it out - knock the non return valve out of the adapter and no more problems!

 

I have never needed gloves to fill with gas - just follow the instructions on the pump and don't touch any of it whilst it's filling.

 

I've never had a problem in France and assuming that you have the correct adapter (below) it might the rubber 'O' ring seal that is causing the problem, unless either the adapter itself or your inlet thread is not letting you screw it in far enough to seal properly as it seems unlikely that more than one lpg pump is defective?

 

http://www.mylpg.eu/adapters#Dish_adapter

 

And that is also quite a handy website for lpg info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tracker - 2016-07-05 7:46 PM

 

I have never needed gloves to fill with gas - just follow the instructions on the pump and don't touch any of it whilst it's filling.

 

.

 

Good advice about following the instructions and not touching anything whilst it's filling.

 

However, read on this forum (I think) about someone who received serious skin burns on hands and arms from an alleged malfunctioning gas filling installation. I can't remember the exact details so it could have been operator error, although this was never admitted and the poster appeared to be an experienced type of guy.

 

Anyway, since then, I've always used gauntlet style gloves to refill. It's not really an inconvenience and it could avoid an unscheduled visit to the hospital. Better safe than sorry !!!

 

No right or wrong ways - just different (apologies for using your footnote but it seemed appropriate).

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robbo - 2016-07-05 9:11 PM

 

Tracker - 2016-07-05 7:46 PM

 

I have never needed gloves to fill with gas - just follow the instructions on the pump and don't touch any of it whilst it's filling.

 

.

 

Good advice about following the instructions and not touching anything whilst it's filling.

 

However, read on this forum (I think) about someone who received serious skin burns on hands and arms from an alleged malfunctioning gas filling installation. I can't remember the exact details so it could have been operator error, although this was never admitted and the poster appeared to be an experienced type of guy.

 

Anyway, since then, I've always used gauntlet style gloves to refill. It's not really an inconvenience and it could avoid an unscheduled visit to the hospital. Better safe than sorry !!!

 

No right or wrong ways - just different (apologies for using your footnote but it seemed appropriate).

 

 

Fair enough!

We all base our actions on what we perceive but as I've never heard of a malfunctioning lpg pump hurting anyone and whilst waiting to use a pump at times in France I've never seen anyone else wearing gloves etc I see no need yet to resort to welding gauntlets or hazchem suits - but thanks for the tip - I'll keep watching just in case!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A while back I was in conversation with a guy who had moved back to the UK after living for several years in Turkey.

 

For some reason or other refilling gas canisters came up and he mentioned that it was the commonplace in Turkey for people to have their empty domestic canisters refilled rather than exchange them as usually happens in the UK. He said a lot of ‘back street’ refilling went on and it wasn’t difficult to spot who regularly did this from the extensive cold-burns on their hands.

 

Calor’s advice on refuelling a vehicle with autogas can be read here

 

https://www.calor.co.uk/media/wysiwyg/PDF/autogas_refuelling_guidelines.pdf

 

Cold-burns to skin and eyes are mentioned in the Calor guide, though not any need to wear gloves or safety glasses (unlike here)

 

 

I don’t know how many (if any) people refuelling vehicles with autogas protect their hands/eyes during the refuelling process, but it’s undoubtedly the case that doing so would minimise the risk of cold-burns.

 

The UK pump-gun connector, if incorrectly used, seems less likely to result in cold-burns than, say, the dish-connector type used in France, but it must still be good practice to wear gloves just in case. In the past I’ve had French pump-guns disconnect spontaneously during refilling and leak badly when refilling begins. When this has happened I’ve had liquid gas pour over my hands and, although this caused no obvious injury, it’s certainly best avoided. Consequently, although I’m not much concerned if I’m refilling my motorhome’s gas canisters in the UK and I haven’t got gloves handy, I make sure I wear gloves if I’m refilling abroad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...