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Expatriates Go Home!


StuartO

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The news this morning said that Angela merkel and Junkers have agreed to block any idea of UK ex-patriates being allowed to remain in the other EU countries where they have settled - although there has also been coverage of an EU scheme to sell EU citizenship to Brits who want to buy it after Brexit, which would presumably include British expatriates.  Over 20 EU countries were appearing to be content with the idea, but it needs unanimous approval.

 

Nothing has been said about EU citizens resident in UK being turfed out after Brexit and indeed most of them are in work and doing a useful job so there would be no point.  But it certainly looks like Junkers and Merkel (and presumably some others) want to make as much difficulty for the UK as possible to "punish" our Country for choosing Brexit to discourage others.

 

I suppose we can hope that Merkel will be voted out along with Hollande come the German elections.  There were interviews with German residents in Hamburg, which has accepted 30,000 refugees, mostly males, expressing concerns similar to those being expressed in UK about the disruptive and threatening impact of mass migration on the German way of life.

 

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Plenty of info avaliable regarding Germans upset and concerned about the impact Merkels disastrous open door invitation has had on Germany ... The AFD party have come from nowhere and proved to be popular with those who don't care for her policy although if the latest predictions are to believed she looks set to win ... We all know about predictions and polls though don't we
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StuartO - 2016-11-30 8:37 AM

 

The news this morning said that Angela merkel and Junkers have agreed to block any idea of UK ex-patriates being allowed to remain in the other EU countries where they have settled -

 

 

 

 

As I understand it they have just said they won't make any deals before we trigger Article 50 ( in March ).

 

What I would call taking up ' a negotiating position '

 

There's going to be a lot of that going on in the next few months.

 

;-)

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Guest pelmetman

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

The other option is to claim asylum >:-) ..........

 

 

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malc d - 2016-11-30 9:40 AM As I understand it they have just said they won't make any deals before we trigger Article 50 ( in March ).What I would call taking up ' a negotiating position 'There's going to be a lot of that going on in the next few months. ;-)

 

You are correct, except that I see it as rather more than adopting a negotiating position; I think there are people in the EU who will be determined to make life as difficult as possible for UK both during the negotiating phase and after Brexit.  It could get very unstable and threatening for the whole of Europe.

 

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pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

 

 

In France its not that easy. We lived there for 14 years but wanted to be a resident but not a citizen on the other hand a Friend of ours, who was a QC for the CPS in the UK and fluent French speaker, retired and moved to France just after us, decided 4 years ago to become a French citizen in case Marine Le Penn got into power, it took her 2 years to get through the process with all the exams she had to take to just become a citizen only. Don't know if its the same in other EU Countries but as everyone knows France is a law unto itself.

 

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Randonneur - 2016-11-30 10:58 AM

 

pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

 

 

In France its not that easy. We lived there for 14 years but wanted to be a resident but not a citizen on the other hand a Friend of ours, who was a QC for the CPS in the UK and fluent French speaker, retired and moved to France just after us, decided 4 years ago to become a French citizen in case Marine Le Penn got into power, it took her 2 years to get through the process with all the exams she had to take to just become a citizen only. Don't know if its the same in other EU Countries but as everyone knows France is a law unto itself.

 

Martyn, May i ask , What made you come back to UK?

PJay

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pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

 

 

The other option is to claim asylum >:-) ..........

 

 

Don't be silly Dave, could remoaners claim to be at risk of persecution in the UK?

 

On second thoughts you may have a point. ;-)

 

God forbid we may even become economic migrants.....

>:-)

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PJay - 2016-11-30 1:09 PM

 

Randonneur - 2016-11-30 10:58 AM

 

pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

 

 

In France its not that easy. We lived there for 14 years but wanted to be a resident but not a citizen on the other hand a Friend of ours, who was a QC for the CPS in the UK and fluent French speaker, retired and moved to France just after us, decided 4 years ago to become a French citizen in case Marine Le Penn got into power, it took her 2 years to get through the process with all the exams she had to take to just become a citizen only. Don't know if its the same in other EU Countries but as everyone knows France is a law unto itself.

 

Martyn, May i ask , What made you come back to UK?

PJay

 

Health reasons, its very difficult understanding French medical terms when your Consultant, a Professor at Bordeaux University Hospital, won't speak one word to help you in English. Most people will help you if you try to speak French and although our French language skills were ok they were not good enough for the medical side. Sylvia had a Professor (Consultant) at Poitiers University Hospital who wanted to hone his English skills so we were ok there. The medical treatment in France is second to none, I hasten to add, as I was in a coma for 5 weeks and rehab for 2 months they were superb but that was at a different hospital in Angouleme. I don't blame anyone for the situation but when you are not at your best it is very frustrating and stressful.

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Randonneur - 2016-11-30 8:16 PM

 

PJay - 2016-11-30 1:09 PM

 

Randonneur - 2016-11-30 10:58 AM

 

pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

 

 

In France its not that easy. We lived there for 14 years but wanted to be a resident but not a citizen on the other hand a Friend of ours, who was a QC for the CPS in the UK and fluent French speaker, retired and moved to France just after us, decided 4 years ago to become a French citizen in case Marine Le Penn got into power, it took her 2 years to get through the process with all the exams she had to take to just become a citizen only. Don't know if its the same in other EU Countries but as everyone knows France is a law unto itself.

 

Martyn, May i ask , What made you come back to UK?

PJay

 

Health reasons, its very difficult understanding French medical terms when your Consultant, a Professor at Bordeaux University Hospital, won't speak one word to help you in English. Most people will help you if you try to speak French and although our French language skills were ok they were not good enough for the medical side. Sylvia had a Professor (Consultant) at Poitiers University Hospital who wanted to hone his English skills so we were ok there. The medical treatment in France is second to none, I hasten to add, as I was in a coma for 5 weeks and rehab for 2 months they were superb but that was at a different hospital in Angouleme. I don't blame anyone for the situation but when you are not at your best it is very frustrating and stressful.

 

Yes i understand. we have a friend in the Haute Viennne region. He had a very serious accident with a horse and cart! The cart turned over and he finished up in a ditch. Broke his pelvis. Taken to I thinkl Potiers Hospital , and they put him in a new (to Them) body contraption, which they did not know how to assemble!1 he being an engineer had to tell them how to fix it from his bed !! But they are also a bit concerned about the health situation when the Brexit comes into force, being in the 70.s .

But i know how happy all our expat friends are with the French Health service

Mind you , In our area we seem to be lucky with a good service, so we can't complain!!

At the end of the day, as you say, it helps to be able to communicate (as long as the nurse/doctor speaks ENGLISH !)

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PJay - 2016-12-01 12:13 AM

 

Randonneur - 2016-11-30 8:16 PM

 

PJay - 2016-11-30 1:09 PM

 

Randonneur - 2016-11-30 10:58 AM

 

pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

 

 

In France its not that easy. We lived there for 14 years but wanted to be a resident but not a citizen on the other hand a Friend of ours, who was a QC for the CPS in the UK and fluent French speaker, retired and moved to France just after us, decided 4 years ago to become a French citizen in case Marine Le Penn got into power, it took her 2 years to get through the process with all the exams she had to take to just become a citizen only. Don't know if its the same in other EU Countries but as everyone knows France is a law unto itself.

 

Martyn, May i ask , What made you come back to UK?

PJay

 

Health reasons, its very difficult understanding French medical terms when your Consultant, a Professor at Bordeaux University Hospital, won't speak one word to help you in English. Most people will help you if you try to speak French and although our French language skills were ok they were not good enough for the medical side. Sylvia had a Professor (Consultant) at Poitiers University Hospital who wanted to hone his English skills so we were ok there. The medical treatment in France is second to none, I hasten to add, as I was in a coma for 5 weeks and rehab for 2 months they were superb but that was at a different hospital in Angouleme. I don't blame anyone for the situation but when you are not at your best it is very frustrating and stressful.

 

Yes i understand. we have a friend in the Haute Viennne region. He had a very serious accident with a horse and cart! The cart turned over and he finished up in a ditch. Broke his pelvis. Taken to I thinkl Potiers Hospital , and they put him in a new (to Them) body contraption, which they did not know how to assemble!1 he being an engineer had to tell them how to fix it from his bed !! But they are also a bit concerned about the health situation when the Brexit comes into force, being in the 70.s .

But i know how happy all our expat friends are with the French Health service

Mind you , In our area we seem to be lucky with a good service, so we can't complain!!

At the end of the day, as you say, it helps to be able to communicate (as long as the nurse/doctor speaks ENGLISH !)

 

Forgot to say that we paid 1800 euros per year for our "TopUp" Insurance so that everything was covered 100% and not just up to 70% as an ex-pat. It did pay dividends when we had to have daily trips to the hospital at Angouleme for weeks on end and again for going to Poitiers for undergoing chemotherapy 3 times a week for 3months, an Ambulance car or a Taxi was provided and paid for on this "TopUp".

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Randonneur - 2016-12-01 10:19 AM

 

PJay - 2016-12-01 12:13 AM

 

Randonneur - 2016-11-30 8:16 PM

 

PJay - 2016-11-30 1:09 PM

 

Randonneur - 2016-11-30 10:58 AM

 

pelmetman - 2016-11-30 9:44 AM

 

Dunno what the fuss is about, if you've emigrated to another country, then I'd of thought applying to become a citizen of that country is a natural thing to do?.......

 

 

 

In France its not that easy. We lived there for 14 years but wanted to be a resident but not a citizen on the other hand a Friend of ours, who was a QC for the CPS in the UK and fluent French speaker, retired and moved to France just after us, decided 4 years ago to become a French citizen in case Marine Le Penn got into power, it took her 2 years to get through the process with all the exams she had to take to just become a citizen only. Don't know if its the same in other EU Countries but as everyone knows France is a law unto itself.

 

Martyn, May i ask , What made you come back to UK?

PJay

 

Health reasons, its very difficult understanding French medical terms when your Consultant, a Professor at Bordeaux University Hospital, won't speak one word to help you in English. Most people will help you if you try to speak French and although our French language skills were ok they were not good enough for the medical side. Sylvia had a Professor (Consultant) at Poitiers University Hospital who wanted to hone his English skills so we were ok there. The medical treatment in France is second to none, I hasten to add, as I was in a coma for 5 weeks and rehab for 2 months they were superb but that was at a different hospital in Angouleme. I don't blame anyone for the situation but when you are not at your best it is very frustrating and stressful.

 

Yes i understand. we have a friend in the Haute Viennne region. He had a very serious accident with a horse and cart! The cart turned over and he finished up in a ditch. Broke his pelvis. Taken to I thinkl Potiers Hospital , and they put him in a new (to Them) body contraption, which they did not know how to assemble!1 he being an engineer had to tell them how to fix it from his bed !! But they are also a bit concerned about the health situation when the Brexit comes into force, being in the 70.s .

But i know how happy all our expat friends are with the French Health service

Mind you , In our area we seem to be lucky with a good service, so we can't complain!!

At the end of the day, as you say, it helps to be able to communicate (as long as the nurse/doctor speaks ENGLISH !)

 

Forgot to say that we paid 1800 euros per year for our "TopUp" Insurance so that everything was covered 100% and not just up to 70% as an ex-pat. It did pay dividends when we had to have daily trips to the hospital at Angouleme for weeks on end and again for going to Poitiers for undergoing chemotherapy 3 times a week for 3months, an Ambulance car or a Taxi was provided and paid for on this "TopUp".

 

 

 

Yes our friends pay top up, of 200 euros a month. Sadly 2 friends have died in France , one had wonderful treatment for Dementia, but the language was a bit of a barrier , as only one person in the home, was able to talk to her. The other had a taxi take her her to Rennes Hospital every day for treatment, fortunately she did speak French.

 

as i said , can't fault the service, it is partly the language problem, (don't get translators called in , like here!!) At a cost to the NHS.

 

There is no place like ones own country, when you get OLD

 

Hope you are both much better now

PJay

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QUOTE]

 

 

 

Yes our friends pay top up, of 200 euros a month. Sadly 2 friends have died in France , one had wonderful treatment for Dementia, but the language was a bit of a barrier , as only one person in the home, was able to talk to her. The other had a taxi take her her to Rennes Hospital every day for treatment, fortunately she did speak French.

 

as i said , can't fault the service, it is partly the language problem, (don't get translators called in , like here!!) At a cost to the NHS.

 

There is no place like ones own country, when you get OLD

 

Hope you are both much better now

PJay

 

Still ongoing chemotherapy, been on that for the last 12 months and will continue for some time but all in all ok. Sylvia has had Leukaemia since 1992 so is an old hat at it. You just have to not let it get you down and we try to have 3/4 days away every few weeks, won't let it get the better of either of us.

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Randonneur - 2016-12-01 4:30 PM...... There is no place like ones own country, when you get OLD.....

 

Very true.  When you get to the stage when you have sold your MH, have lost interest in going on holiday, your horizons have shrunk and you spend your time in or close to home, eating meals on wheels and watching familiar TV programmes, I should imagine the relevance of the outdoor winter climate to your quality of life wanes considerably.

 

It will come to us all in due course!

 

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StuartO - 2016-12-02 9:30 AM
Randonneur - 2016-12-01 4:30 PM...... There is no place like ones own country, when you get OLD.....

 

Very true.  When you get to the stage when you have sold your MH, have lost interest in going on holiday, your horizons have shrunk and you spend your time in or close to home, eating meals on wheels and watching familiar TV programmes, I should imagine the relevance of the outdoor winter climate to your quality of life wanes considerably.

 

It will come to us all in due course!

Just seen that you have a very good Avatar, we are also Lancashire born and bred.
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StuartO - 2016-12-02 9:30 AM
Randonneur - 2016-12-01 4:30 PM...... There is no place like ones own country, when you get OLD.....

 

Very true.  When you get to the stage when you have sold your MH, have lost interest in going on holiday, your horizons have shrunk and you spend your time in or close to home, eating meals on wheels and watching familiar TV programmes, I should imagine the relevance of the outdoor winter climate to your quality of life wanes considerably.

 

It will come to us all in due course!

Hopefully to some sooner than others!
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starvin marvin - 2016-12-02 7:07 PM
StuartO - 2016-12-02 9:30 AM
Randonneur - 2016-12-01 4:30 PM...... There is no place like ones own country, when you get OLD.....

 

Very true.  When you get to the stage when you have sold your MH, have lost interest in going on holiday, your horizons have shrunk and you spend your time in or close to home, eating meals on wheels and watching familiar TV programmes, I should imagine the relevance of the outdoor winter climate to your quality of life wanes considerably.

 

It will come to us all in due course!

Hopefully to some sooner than others!

 

Hopefully that doesn't mean you wish misfortune on others Marvin!  I hope we all get a good run for our money, wherever we choose to spend our retirement years.

 

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