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MikenKath

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Our coach built needs cosmetic warranty work (crazing&cracking to gell coat) first saw at 10months old we live 150mls and 3hours from dealer they think it may be a 2day job is there any hope of compensation for our £60fuel and £80 b&b (average for area)costs,from the manufacturer.
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Only if the dealer of manufacturer is in a good mood and willing to make a contribution. No harm in asking. Expect 'no' for an answer.

 

You could ask the dealer whether you could stay overnight in the van when it is on their premises to cut your costs. Only one of you need to go with the van so that should halve the B&B figure.

 

Could you travel back and forth by train any cheaper? Would the dealer collect the vehicle?

 

Could you combine the trip with a holiday? It won't cut your costs but it might ease the pain if you have a bit of enjoyment out of the trip.

 

Does it have to be done now or can you organise it so it can be done as part of your annual service?

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Hi,

Over the years we have had three scenarios. i.e.

1. A problem dealt with by me obtaining a minor part, fitting it and then

being reimbursed by the dealer. All agreed beforehand.

2. Driving to the dealership, being reimbursed for the diesel (both ways) and

staying overnight in one of their motorhomes because the work took longer

than expected.

3. Having the dealer pick up and return the vehicle, with reimbursement for the

diesel.

The main difference with all of these situations is that the work was not warranty work. It was work agreed to as part of the original deal and not accomplished by the dealer before we picked up the vehicle

 

Personally I would expect to be reimbursed for the diesel. Not too sure about the B&B situation. Perhaps the previous suggestion of staying at the dealer’s may be an option.

Cattwg :-D

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Hi Cattwg,

Under the circumstances and being a warranty job and not some fancy extra you want fitting, I would ask if the dealer in the name of goodwill could possibly collect and return the vehicle. You could even make a small donation to his cost and still save money and time.

chhers

derek

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Mike

 

Check the 'sale of goods' act that was in force when you bought the vehicle.

 

When we bought our van in 2011 there were a number of issues which needed to be seen to under warranty and at that time the act said they 'had to be sorted at my convenience at at NO COST to me.' When pointed out to dealer and he realised I was serious he paid for the fuel.

 

Dave

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MikenKath - 2017-04-06 8:18 PM

 

Our coach built needs cosmetic warranty work (crazing&cracking to gell coat) first saw at 10months old we live 150mls and 3hours from dealer they think it may be a 2day job is there any hope of compensation for our £60fuel and £80 b&b (average for area)costs,from the manufacturer.

Read the warranty. It defines and limits what the manufacturer has undertaken to do. If it includes such compensation (doubtful, IMO: sorry) it is covered, if not the warranty does not provide for compensation.

 

So, if you want to be compensated for you additional costs and lost time you must rely on your rights against the dealer under consumer legislation, as explained above. If unsure how those rights might apply to you, talk to your local Trading Standards, or to Citizens Advice. Citizen's Advice is probably the easier option, and you should find the answers to your questions on their website.

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Hi, you didnt say the make of van, but years ago, I had a van wiyh similar problems..gellcoat cracking on the roof panels. My local dealer allegedly referred it back to the manufactory,, but promised they would update me when they had an answer. After 3 weeks, I enquired, and was told that they had been told to "get it fixed locally".

 

A quote from a local repairer was passed back to them for approval, but it all went very quiet. Local dealer referred it back again to maker, again.. still no response.

 

I took matters into my own hands, phoned the maker in Broadway, who agreed to send down someone to inspect it, for a decision.

 

He duly came complete with factory production records, inspected it, and showed me the records, which had noted the problem and agreed it had to go back for correction..

 

I arranged to take it back to Broadway, and stayed overnight, for them to do the work next day.

 

Following day,went to collect it, repair ok, so asked them to reimburse me for time and trouble..

 

Eventually after some forceful debate, I settled for a tank of diesel, to get me back home.

 

They only agreed once I reminded them that the factory paperwork had showed that they had not fixed the problem before it left the factory. It had stated, repairs to be done before leaving factory.

 

From start to finish, was approx 3 months!

 

Tonyg3nwl

 

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hi,

I would hate to think that everything just comes down to the written word and liability in a warranty

clause. It is the things and attitudes around that that distinguish the good dealers from the bad or can't be arsed dealers imo. I would obviously have a diffrent opinion if this work was elective.

cheers

derek

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derek pringle - 2017-04-08 9:20 AM

 

hi,

I would hate to think that everything just comes down to the written word and liability in a warranty

clause. It is the things and attitudes around that that distinguish the good dealers from the bad or can't be arsed dealers imo. I would obviously have a diffrent opinion if this work was elective.

cheers

derek

Under consumer legislation there is a concept of reasonableness: both parties are expected to deal with each other in a reasonable fashion, and each may only expect of the other what is reasonable. Where "reasonable" is contested, a court can be asked to judge.

 

With a warranty or guaranty, the legal concept of reasonableness does not apply, and although a manufacturer can be held to their warranty, they cannot be legally compelled to do more than the warranty says they will do. Moreover, a warranty is a promise, in addition to consumer rights, offered to the end user by the manufacturer. The manufacturer may elect to do more, but cannot be compelled to do so. In effect, the manufacturer is taking from the seller some of his obligations under consumer law.

 

If the manufacturer falls back on the wording of his guaranty, there isn't a lot the average consumer can do about it, except pursue his claim against the seller. I agree, it would be nice if all manufacturers and sellers all gave a disappointed buyer their full co-operation, but not all do. Where they don't, the buyer is better off ignoring the warranty/guaranty, and pursuing the seller for reasonable recompense and, if necessary, pursuing him through the courts. Sadly, that is why the written word becomes so important when things go wrong. Smiles and verbal assurances cannot be proved in court, what is written can.

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Our first LeVoyageur had quite a few faults and Bill from Hayes drove to our house and it was arranged to go back to LeVoyageur in France.

The service was superb from Hayes and the company.

They paid all our fuel bills. The Tunnel. Hotel. Car hire etc.

It took them 3 days to rectify the faults.

It's worth asking.

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