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Using a laptop when outandabout


Will86

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I use a camera and transfer the images to the laptop, then to a larger PC indoors where I add the relevant information. So far not a problem. I use a variety of memory sticks of varying capacities.

 

Some work instantly. Some take ages to transfer even when storing little memory.

 

Do they weaken with use?

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Memory sticks can deteriorate with age, but that's not likely to be the problem. Try this:

 

- Insert your memory stick

- Click Start Menu

- Click on My Computer (or your Operating System equivalent)

- Right-click your memory stick and choose Properties

- Select Hardware tab

- Highlight your drive

- Click Properties button

- Under Policies tab, click Optimize for Performance button

- OK your way out

 

The nomenclature may differ in your system but you should be able to 'translate'. Note taht, after doing this, you need to use 'safely remove hardware' icon.

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Will86 - 2017-08-11 7:13 PM

 

I use a camera and transfer the images to the laptop, then to a larger PC indoors where I add the relevant information. So far not a problem. I use a variety of memory sticks of varying capacities.

 

Some work instantly. Some take ages to transfer even when storing little memory.

 

 

 

Do they weaken with use?

 

 

The fact is that no-one really knows yet how long memory sticks and discs will last - there are no really OLD ones yet.

 

It's all speculation.

 

I have one or two black and white photos that are a hundred years old - I doubt if any of our discs will still be usable in a hundred years time.

 

;-)

 

Plus of course we have planned obsolescence and businesses will ensure that we have to keep changing / updating our gadgets in order to view our old photos.

 

:-(

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The answer is yes they do wear out. Eventually.

This is typical of the explanations when this subject is discussed (taken from the web)

 

 

USB Flash Drives Have Finite Number of Write/Erase Cycles

 

The life expectancy of a USB Flash Drive can be measured by the number of write or erase cycles. USB flash drives can withstand between 10,000 to 100,000 write/erase cycles, depending on the memory technology used.

 

When the limit is reached, some portion of the memory may not function properly, leading to lost of data and corruption.

 

Of course, the flash drive’s life can also end prematurely if you abuse it or subject it to extreme environmental conditions. Additionally, if low quality memory components are used, the flash drives can fail at a much earlier time.

 

Beware of unknown brands, as they may use low quality components and cut corners in the manufacturing processes in order to keep cost low. If you are looking for high quality usb flash drives, find vendors that use only grade A memory and have ISO-9001:2008 certified factories.

 

Should You Use Flash Drives to Store Important Files?

 

The best usage of flash drives is to copy and transfer files from one computer to another. If you want to use it to store important files such as family photos and videos, it is recommended to make duplicate copies.

 

Caring for Your Flash Drive

 

To prolong the life of your flash drive and ensure that it operates properly for years to come, here are some precautions to follow:

 

When not using the flash drive, be sure to cover it with a cap to prevent the accumulation of dusts and contaminants on the contacts.

Do not expose your flash drive to harsh conditions, such as extreme temperatures and humidity.

Never yank the flash drive out of the USB port while it is still in operation. Also, you should “Eject” the drive (Do a right click on the USB drive and select “Eject”) before removing it from your computer.

Do not leave it plugged to the computer for prolonged period of time. If you do not use it, just unplug it from your computer.

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snowie - 2017-08-11 8:50 PM

 

And if in doubt: back your photos up, then try to make it go faster.

I've lost family pics that can never be replaced, only once, but I assumed that the contents of my hard drive would be ok once too often,

Take care

Alan b

Uff......a major fatality which was never a problem with good old fashioned albums full of snapshots! I've had a drive go down though fortunately no important photo's on but since then i've bought two external hard drives.....a 3tb and a 5tb and use those to back up everything from my internal drives. The externals are then powered off and disconnected from my pc so they aren't running unnecessarily.

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USB plugs and sockets tend to get worn/dirty in motorhome laptops as you plug and unplug them every time you get the laptop out - unlike the home PC where they stay connected. Worth getting a short USB extension cable. When the USB plug and socket in your laptop get worn and fail to connect, it sometimes works to plug the thing in through the extension cable. So you don't have a worn plug and a worn socket connected together. The worn plug and socket are each connected into a clean new socket and plug.

PS: Something like this: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/0-5m-USB-2-0-EXTENSION-Cable-Lead-A-Male-Plug-to-Female-Socket-Short-50cm/371061250753

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Will, check whether your memory sticks have the same speed. Newer ones may be quicker. I wonder whether your laptop or PC have same capabilities is quicker [PCs tend to be quicker than laptops]. My old iMac can only take in information at USB 2.0 whilst my newer one can take USB3.0 and Thunderbolt. The technical numbers make no sense to me except I know my newer iMac downloads photos from the camera, either by cable or using the camera card which can go in the back of the Mac, about 50% quicker.

 

As already stated, memory sticks can degrade with time and abuse although for many buying good quality sticks, it's likely the stick will be outdated before it fails.

 

I keep my photos on my iMac, and follow the 3-2-1 backup rule devised by a professional photographer [unlike me!]. 3 copies of the data, 2 different media, and 1 off site. For me, this means my iMac, a compatible external hard drive using Time Machine, and iCloud for 79p a month [my 2,000 photos takes up 40GB of cloud space].

 

Every now and again, I create a traditional paper photo album for those photos which mean the most to me.

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Thanks everyone a lot of interesting info there I would suggest choosing a good quality memory stick is impossible as they all seem similar.

 

I follow that new is mostly better with modern machinery producing them but I do have some very old ones with small memories that still function as new.

 

I'm guessing one answer is to buy a high capacity device and keep the storage minimal, label it and keep it in an airtight bag.

 

One notable comment said hastily removing a memory stick is not a good idea ... and I'm certainly guilty of that.

 

PS

All my devices are a mix and match which I know is a problem when transferring typed pages. I presume the only fool-proof answer is to use new of everything all the time but who does ?

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Can't speak from extensive knowledge, Will, but Sandisk and Lexar have proved reliable so far for me. I assume you're saving the images to the hard drive on your laptop, and only using the flash memory as back up? If not, it may be worth considering doing this - just in case! :-)

 

The capacity of the flash memory sticks just keeps increasing, so go for the max your laptop will recognise (it seems some of the earlier operating systems have in-built limits to the capacity of flash memory sticks they can operate).

 

I think I'm right to say there are three versions of USB: plain vanilla USB, USB2 and USB3, each having faster transfer speeds than its predecessor. If your laptop has USB3 (possibly only one port, the others being USB2, the USB3 will have a blue "tongue"), plug the flash stick into that port for preference.

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Yes Brian, there is only one port that accepts the USB and I did wonder why. There's a label saying USB 3.0 faster than 2.

 

I did use CD's but they became terrible when opening. I store lots of different written articles and searching became tedious so by using an outside memory the object was to shorten the search time.

 

Storing pictures on the laptop or PC is not a problem. I will persist.

 

Thanks Will

 

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I use a Transcend 1TB portable hard drive for all my backups, it's pretty bullit proof and very fast.

 

Just plug it into a USB socket and off you go. I swop it between my PC and laptop so all my Lightroom work is always on tap.

 

They cost around £55, so pretty cheap per GB.

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This may sound a bit too high tech for some people but this is how I store some very important information.

 

I bought a Printer (not expensive) and a pack of A4 blank paper. By linking the Printer to the computer, I can transfer everything on to a sheet of paper. Then I bought something called a File and put the sheets of paper in there.

 

So far I have not lost or been unable to open any of these 'papers'.

 

Hope that helps. :D

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Hi

First point to look at is your SD card read/write speed, these vary.

Similarly flash drives are of differing quality.

 

My photo workflow, when away, is to :-

Take multiple sd cards and keep when full till end of holiday.

Back up sd card to laptop at the end of each day ( I have had sd cards fail)

2nd back up of photos to small potable hard disk from laptop at the end of each day

 

This gives 3 copies of each photo. I carry the sd cards in my camera bag soooo if something happens to Moho I still have a copy.

 

You can expect spinning hard disks to fail periodically, I have had them fail after 12 months or last for years, it's a lottery sooooo 3 copies gives redundancy. Similarly flas drives and solid state hard disks also fail so don't rely on them alone.

 

Similarly at home I have two backups of computer hard disk. Back up weekly and monthly. Do not keep backups plugged in to computer to prevent virus corruption. Finally I back up key photos to amazon prime.

 

Hope that helps

 

Peter

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747 - 2017-08-12 2:10 PM

 

This may sound a bit too high tech for some people but this is how I store some very important information.

 

I bought a Printer (not expensive) and a pack of A4 blank paper. By linking the Printer to the computer, I can transfer everything on to a sheet of paper. Then I bought something called a File and put the sheets of paper in there.

 

So far I have not lost or been unable to open any of these 'papers'.

 

Hope that helps. :D

 

What happens if your house burns down? Back up to the cloud and never lose.

 

Peter

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747 - 2017-08-12 2:10 PM

 

This may sound a bit too high tech for some people but this is how I store some very important information.

 

I bought a Printer (not expensive) and a pack of A4 blank paper. By linking the Printer to the computer, I can transfer everything on to a sheet of paper. Then I bought something called a File and put the sheets of paper in there.

 

So far I have not lost or been unable to open any of these 'papers'.

 

Hope that helps. :D

 

 

 

I tried your idea but my video clips just would not transfer to A4 paper.

 

;-)

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747 - 2017-08-12 2:10 PM

 

This may sound a bit too high tech for some people but this is how I store some very important information.

 

I bought a Printer (not expensive) and a pack of A4 blank paper. By linking the Printer to the computer, I can transfer everything on to a sheet of paper. Then I bought something called a File and put the sheets of paper in there.

 

So far I have not lost or been unable to open any of these 'papers'.

 

Hope that helps. :D

PMSL!! :D True, printers are cheap now but where you used to chuck the empty ink carts away you now chuck the printer when the inks have run out as they cost more to replace than the damn printer!!

 

Regards Wills issue with memory sticks and speed etc, having bought large capacity ones off fleabay at "bargain" prices only to find they don't read/write at the claimed speed and often aren't the claimed capacity either. In short they are fake copies of popular brands. There are a variety of programs you can install to check a sticks speed and capacity.

 

I pushed the boat out after a recommendation and bought a couple of Patriot Rage 32gb sticks. Not cheap by any means but the claimed read/write speed is spot on, and they are fast.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/USB-Flash-Drives/Patriot-Supersonic-Flash-Drive-180MB/B008R6OPJQ

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peterjl - 2017-08-12 2:47 PM

 

747 - 2017-08-12 2:10 PM

 

This may sound a bit too high tech for some people but this is how I store some very important information.

 

I bought a Printer (not expensive) and a pack of A4 blank paper. By linking the Printer to the computer, I can transfer everything on to a sheet of paper. Then I bought something called a File and put the sheets of paper in there.

 

So far I have not lost or been unable to open any of these 'papers'.

 

Hope that helps. :D

 

What happens if your house burns down? Back up to the cloud and never lose.

 

Peter

With all this global warming going off up in the cloud is too risky. ;-)

 

Safer on the ground mate.

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I don't find things too Hi Tech if they are an answer to a problem and it seems there are many variations to a perfect answer. Its a lottery depending on many factors, age, type, quality etc.

 

Printing seems to be a perfect answer but the digital world was designed to reduce all that. Trust nothing digital comes to mind.

 

From all that has been offered I favour printing as lasting 'for ever'. Curiously the most important documents I've produced have all been printed ... so I had unwittingly been a step ahead of any digital failures..

 

Thanks to all I've learned a lot. Although Motorhome related I somehow knew this was the place for good knowledge. Many of you must be engineering based as engineering background folk will always have an answer. Apologies to non engineers but its how I find life.

 

Will

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747 - 2017-08-12 2:10 PM

 

This may sound a bit too high tech for some people but this is how I store some very important information.

 

I bought a Printer (not expensive) and a pack of A4 blank paper. By linking the Printer to the computer, I can transfer everything on to a sheet of paper. Then I bought something called a File and put the sheets of paper in there.

 

So far I have not lost or been unable to open any of these 'papers'.

 

Hope that helps. :D

 

Ink fades. But digital photos are just a series of numbers so a 100th generation copy will still be the same as the original in 1000 years time.

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JPEG images are said to deteriorate every time they are compressed which happens every time they are saved. Digital images in other formats may last as long as we have the devices on which to view them. We know that photographs can last 200 years which is probably long enough to see out Will!

 

 

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