Jump to content

Bridgend braces for fallout from Ford closure - Toyota goes to EU


Bulletguy

Recommended Posts

Ford Bridgend plant will shut down production and close on September 25th this year with the loss of 1700 jobs. As it was the towns largest employer it will undoubtedly affect numerous small local businesses.

 

I feel sorry for those that will lose their jobs, even the Turkeys that voted to end their own jobs without realising they were being lied to. I lost sympathy altogether for those among them that voted Tory in the election as by then it was crystal clear how damaging a Tory Brexit would be for the car industry.

 

Bridgend has long been a poor area of Wales and thoroughly depressing to drive through....it's like a timewarp. Quite odd that they voted to make themselves even poorer. Something of a hair shirt mentality. Perhaps Johnson will re-open the Bridgend plant to start producing Unicorns.......or maybe a Turkey farm.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/mar/05/bridgend-braces-fallout-ford-factory-closure-wales

 

Meantime Toyota confirm they will design, develop and build their new Aygo in Europe. It's good to see the car industry "taking back control" because UK lost it four years ago.

 

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/new-toyota-aygo-be-designed-developed-and-built-europe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whilst Nissans news is good news for its workforce in Sunderland which voted 61% Leave, their long term future will be reliant on a frictionless tariff-free trade which won't happen if Johnson drags UK out with a 'no deal' exit.

 

Ford Bridgend and Honda Swindon plants went due to that uncertainty and Johnsons backers hoping to capitalise on a 'no deal' exit is no help at all to the future of thousands of employees. So Nissan can up sticks and relocate just as easily and quickly as both Ford and Honda if UK leave without a deal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Paul, The three previous local AU manufacturers, Holden (GM), Ford &Toyota all pulled out of local manufacturing back around 2017ish. GM last week announced they woul pull out of Aust completely, suggesting they are exiting all right hand drive markets. The decision makers in the car companies will move from country/continent in order to maximise profits with IMHO no consideration for staff or customer base. If the Govt handouts are better in another country than the one they are in they will move without a second thought. I would suggest Brexit is only one of many aspects they consider in making a decision to pull out of a market. In my lifetime we have seen the following car companies pull out of local AU assembly or production - GM! Ford, Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi,Leyland, VW, Hillman,Standard Vanguard, Renault and the list goes on. Cheers,
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Geeco - 2020-03-08 12:29 AM

 

Paul, The three previous local AU manufacturers, Holden (GM), Ford &Toyota all pulled out of local manufacturing back around 2017ish. GM last week announced they woul pull out of Aust completely, suggesting they are exiting all right hand drive markets. The decision makers in the car companies will move from country/continent in order to maximise profits with IMHO no consideration for staff or customer base. If the Govt handouts are better in another country than the one they are in they will move without a second thought. I would suggest Brexit is only one of many aspects they consider in making a decision to pull out of a market. In my lifetime we have seen the following car companies pull out of local AU assembly or production - GM! Ford, Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi,Leyland, VW, Hillman,Standard Vanguard, Renault and the list goes on. Cheers,

Agreed Gary. Moving production from one place to another is a major decision, based largely on the economics of production and distribution. It is very unlikely that Brexit would be the sole cause of such a decision but, IMO, it is highly probable that it was the last straw. But, for so long as Ford wants to sell cars in the UK, it is unlikely they will say what role Brexit played.

 

We shall then be back where we were before 1973 when, along with Ireland, we were the only significant market for RHD vehicles in Europe, so UK/Ireland prices reflected our lack of choice, and the inefficiencies of the UK manufacturers.

 

It then became economical for the Japanese to export half way round the world because they also drive on the left, so modifications for the UK market were minimal.

 

Car production methods have changed out of recognition over the intervening 50 odd years, and the development costs for new models are far too high for any volume manufacturer to build for a single market of 65 or so million people. Niche producers, OK, but not for volume sales.

 

So the prices we shall pay will simply reflect how badly the continental and other manufacturers want to sell us their RHD vehicles - which seems to be about where Aus stands as well, except that competition from the US, Japan, China, Korea, and possibly India, is presumably greater than that from Europe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Gary....Hillman??? That name brings back memories of UK 60's along with Standard Vanguard! What were they doing out in Oz?! :D

 

Interestingly i see Peugeot own the Hillman brand name. The odd one or two still pop up on collector car and auction sites like ebay and one in good condition can be bought quite reasonably as they aren't that desirable.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillman

 

Regarding government handouts, Nissan Sunderland were offered an £80 million bribe to stay just four months after the referendum.

 

https://www.itv.com/news/2019-02-04/government-offered-nissan-up-to-80m-in-2016-to-build-new-cars-in-uk/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Brian....these import/export charts are interesting. US imports more than three times the amount of vehicles it exports whilst Germany is the other way round....exporting more than three times what it imports. Our import/export figure remain almost the same.

 

Imports; http://www.worldstopexports.com/cars-imports-by-country/

 

Exports; http://www.worldstopexports.com/car-exports-country/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brian Kirby - 2020-03-08 12:00 PM

 

 

 

 

So the prices we shall pay will simply reflect how badly the continental and other manufacturers want to sell us their RHD vehicles - which seems to be about where Aus stands as well, except that competition from the US, Japan, China, Korea, and possibly India, is presumably greater than that from Europe.

 

Brian you are correct cars from manufacturers with a head office in Japan or Korea head up the list of the biggest sellers in AU. However that does not reflect on where they are built. Thailand has a free trade agreement with AU so a large percentage of Japanese brands (read Utes, SUV) are built in Thailand.

Currently we receive vehicles from South Africa, Europe, Thailand, Japan, Korea, USA, Mexico, Czech Republic, China, Malaysia & India.

cheers,

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...