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Kenwood DMX125DAB radio Current drain?


Mike P

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I recently had the original Autotrail radio replaced with the Kenwood DMX125DAB radio. It works fine but even when switched off seems to draw 1.25 amps hence flattening the leisure battery. Can anyone offer advice please?
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It sounds like they have connected the ignition live lead to the leisure battery so that the unit will work with the ignition off. If they have then you will need to fit a switch to turn the unit off when you are not using it.

 

Keith.

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The installation/operating instructions for a Kenwood DMX125DAB radio indicate that it is intended for a vehicle with an ignition-switch with an ‘Accessries’ position. However, (unlike the Pioneer unit fitted to my Rapido) the Kenwood radio does appear to have a ‘power off’ switch (image attached below).

 

Whatever - as Mike says - a 1.25A drain is a helluva lot...

kenwood.png.f35377fa604b536db4d9353df5b4f4db.png

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How did you measure the current drain? ie

 

1. At the radio – in which case it’s definitely the radio causing the 1.25A drain

 

or

 

2. At the leisure battery, in which case it might be caused by something else – possibly something that was dislodged/misconnected during the radio installation.

 

 

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Despite having the "Power Switch", the installation instructions for that unit are quite specific (see attachment below).

 

A number of people have reported that various makes/models of aftermarket radios take quite a current draw when the nominally ignition-switched wire is permanently connected (something that is avoided on vehicles with an "Acc" position on the ignition switch).

 

The current draw reported is high, but not out of the region I have seen reported for certain models left permanently supplied.

 

I would suggest (particularly given the installation instructions) that the wiring is investigated, and if the (nominally) ignition-controlled supply is in fact permanent, that a switch is incorporated in that wire at the most convenient location you can reach/mount. A small mini round rocker switch is easy to mount, and most are rated at 16A, which should be enough. (I have done this on a Clarion unit).

 

(There are normally two power supplies, one is low-current generally meant to retain settings, etc. and it is conventional for this to be a permanent supply, the other, for the main functioning is, on many/most models, meant to be interruptable, and if it isn't, the current draw issues you have can become apparent.)

Kenwood.JPG.a92c4e200305ab9ee248cbaa79c8ee5d.JPG

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If the unit does prove to be permanently powered, make sure the switch is inserted in the "ignition-switched" wiring, not the permanent feed (otherwise, your problem will continue *and* the unit is likely to lose all its settings when turned off ;-) )

 

A simple switch should suffice (as I used in my previous 'van). It's useful, but not imperative, to mount it in reach of the driver. Quite often the small rocker switch is drilled into the dash to the left of the wheel, but I prefer to have something that is easily reversed, so on the last 'van it was placed in the little plastic blanking panel that houses the USB and Aux sockets on 'vans so equipped (mine wasn't). Easily removed by sourcing the small insert. (The attachment shows the switch, and a second to manually switch the reversing camera)

 

My current Hymer is somewhat more sophisticated; the radio is supplied via an additional, switched, Schaudt control box hidden behind the dashboard. With the switch off, the Schaudt box simulates an "Acc" position, with power being supplied from the vehicle battery when ignition is on (and not with ignition off). With the switch on, this is overriden with permanent connection to the leisure batteries, allowing use on-site without depleting the vehicle battery.

 

The Hymer write-up says slightly different, but the Schaudt instructions (German only for this module) and the wiring confirm that the above is how it works.

 

...as you were...

radio.jpg.6caa28ad0cbf43dae83b4e3f4619b73b.jpg

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Robinhood - 2020-07-18 1:26 PM

 

==================================================================================

==================================================================================

 

My current Hymer is somewhat more sophisticated; the radio is supplied via an additional, switched, Schaudt control box hidden behind the dashboard. With the switch off, the Schaudt box simulates an "Acc" position, with power being supplied from the vehicle battery when ignition is on (and not with ignition off). With the switch on, this is overriden with permanent connection to the leisure batteries, allowing use on-site without depleting the vehicle battery.

==================================================================================

==================================================================================

.

 

This seems similar to my home brewed system which was originally designed to allow operation of the radio without depleting the vehicle battery. In my system the relay is operated from the radio's original ignition controlled supply. With the relay operated the radio's "ACC+ connection" is connected to the permanent supply from the habitation battery. With ignition off, the above "ACC+ connection" is supplied from the habitation battery via a remote switch box, which also incorporates a digital timer for delayed switch off.

 

Alan

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The Hymer manual in English presents it as simply a manual override by a small rocker switch (similar to those pictured above) mounted on the dash, to permanently power the radio from the vehicle battery. (Which, knowing the issues around current drain, didn't seem logical).

 

I replaced my radio, discovered the Schaudt "Rad 01" module behind the dash, and the structure and wiring suggested something a bit more useful.

 

The instructions for this unit are only available from Schaudt in German, but the wiring diagram followed by translation confirmed it. (in fact, it is slightly more sophisticated than I set out above; When the engine is running, the radio is connected to the starter battery whatever the position of the "override" switch. Without the engine running, the radio is disconnected (inoperative) if the switch is off, and connected to the leisure battery, and operative, if the switch is on).

 

It's quite a neat solution, which also caters for similar connection of a camera, if you could think of any reason why you should want to (though TBF, I was thinking reversing camera, whereas it might be intended for a dash camera).

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