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Interior Liner-Removal and Repair or Replacement


_Chris

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There is a split in the liner above the sink area in my Auto-sleeper which I would like to repair before it gets worse. I've had some helpful advice on how to repair it from several people on the owners forum (fibreglass mat and epoxy) but I'm a bit wary about how to go about removing it.

 

There are electrical sockets and screws with caps on and a window blind that will need to be removed. The panel extends to behind the curtain where there are more screws with caps on. The glass flap by the hob probably needs removing as well but access to the rear bracket looks awkward and there may be more fixings behind the green trim above.

 

The question is, after I have removed the obvious am I going to be able to angle the panel out from behind the sink and hob base unit or will this need to be removed as well?

 

As far as obtaining a new replacement goes it's a year 2000 model so spares parts are probably limited but do the more modern Symbols use the same panel. I've asked Auto-sleepers but so far they have been ... sleepy.

 

Photos follow.

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817990277_InteriorLiner21.jpg.bb2ac14e511fb88c4bf278db311259e6.jpg

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Taking your last question first (“...do the more modern Symbols use the same panel?”) it depends on what you mean by “more modern”. I’ve looked at photos in an on-line advert for a 2010 Symbol and that definitely does not have that panel as the set-up above the kichen work surfaces is quite different to yours,

 

I’m very doubtful that any forum-member here can give you blow-by-blow advice about getting the panel out. If such guidance were avaiable (and could be trusted) it should come from the Auto-Sleepers forums and you’ve already tried them.

 

I’d expect repair of this type of split to normally involve removal of the panel and (as you’ve said) gluing a ‘patch’ on the panel’s rear. But the fact that the panel has split means it is almost certainly not made of glass-fibre and, after 20 years, is likely to be pretty fragile. So attempting to remove the panel is going to risk it being damaged even more seriously.

 

I’m aware that you haven’t owned your motorhome very long and you obviously will want to return it to tip-top condition. However, unless there’s a way to repair the split from the front (ie. without removing the plastic panel) so that the result ends up cosmetically acceptable, you might be wise to accept that the split is best left alone.

 

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Yes, best left alone.

 

I heard back from Auto-sleepers and they do it in 2 separate panels now. My type of panel is no longer available as a spare part. It's just that I want to use an electric kettle in that socket and it flexes the panel each time I plug anything into it. I suppose I could leave the lead plugged in all the time and just store the kettle when on the move.

 

I suppose this sort of thing is to be expected on such an old vehicle.

 

Cheers

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_Chris - 2020-10-05 2:09 PM

 

Yes, best left alone.

 

I heard back from Auto-sleepers and they do it in 2 separate panels now. My type of panel is no longer available as a spare part. It's just that I want to use an electric kettle in that socket and it flexes the panel each time I plug anything into it. I suppose I could leave the lead plugged in all the time and just store the kettle when on the move.

 

I suppose this sort of thing is to be expected on such an old vehicle.

 

Cheers

 

You could try removing the sockets to see if some sort of reinforcement could be added behind them so that, when a plug is inserted/removed, it does not flex the panel. I suspect this would prove impracticable (though still worth checking) as there is likely to be insulation behind the panel, so leaving the kettle's lead plugged in would be the simplest plan.

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Hi if it is possible to remove the socket you could try and fill any void with expanding spray foam, if not possible how about drilling a neat pattern of holes and squirting foam through them .Screw caps placed over the holes could disguise the holes. If the foam makes the panel rigid behind, a neatly cut and shaped piece of plastic of some sort superglued over the crack could make a reasonably tidy repair. I recently put a small but deep scratch high up on the side of my motorhome, bit of body filler rubbed smooth and a Union Flag sticker (matching on both sides) , the only people who will know are the people reading this post (lol).

Regards David

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Thanks for all the advice. I'll try removing the sockets to see what is behind them.

 

I did think that plastic welding could be an option by apparently most of these mouldings are made from ABS and are not weldable.

 

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Repairing ABS can be done

 

https://tinyurl.com/yy6byrrv

 

and repair ‘kits’ are advertised (example here)

 

http://www.repairingproducts.co.uk/product/plast-aid-acrylic-and-pvc-multi-purpose-repair-kit/

 

The difficulty in your case is that, at present, the panel looks OK except for the split, but - if you try to DIY-repair the split without removing the panel - there’s a fair chance that a) the repair will be ineffective and b) the end result will look much worse than now.

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