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Computer Failure


Guest Syd

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Recently my computer crashed and although I am well aware that you should "Back Up" every day or so, like everyone else I didn't.

 

I have lost some very important, to me, documents.

 

The reason for this post is that having replaced my hard drive and put it into a exterior hard drive case I see that it is only booting up partly, say nearly half booted, before it stops. Obviously a power up fault.

 

Is there anyway that at least some of the information held on this hard drive can be recovered.

 

 

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There are some/ many programmes that scan the hard drive for files even after they have been so called erased, and recover them even if they have been reformatted.I use one prog but not advertising on here.

Best bet is maybe take it to a PC doctor who can retrieve the files for you.

Thai

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Syd Is it an IDE drive ? if so assuming you have bought a new hard drive put the old hard drive in as a secondary drive or slave.

 

Your operating system should now be on the new drive . The old drive will not be bootable and you should be able to read and copy the info between drives if you can't access the infomation the drive is broken dead KAPOOT. This will often allow you to save info off a faulty drive before it dies. Thats the best way hubby does it all the time mending friends.

He said thats the quickest way.

 

Let us know. After that you could put it in the post to hubby ONLY IF YOU WANT up to you. ;-)

He dont understand what you mean by booting only half up if its the secondary drive it should just act as a memory store and only spin when you request information from it.

Using it as an external memory is a good solution but if you can't read it the most secure way is as above as a cabinet because thats how the architecture of the board and the hard drive was initially intended...

 

If you put the old drive in as a secondary drive in a computor case if once started you cannot read the old hard drive re boot several times and keep on trying to read sometimes they read 10 times later. They stick basically

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Thanks for that to you both, will go to my local computer shop this afternoon for a recovery program and try that.

I have tried what you are saying Michele but so far had no luck but will give it several goes this morning.

 

Thai Bry

Would you be comfortable with PM ing me the name of the program that you use.

No big worries if you prefer not.

 

Thanks again

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Hi Syd,

 

Recovering the data off the old drive as Michele advises is good advice, you might like to look at http://tinyurl.com/38jnst as an alternative to playing around with IDE and power connectors. I have one of these and it works very well, also using your old drives for archiving is easy and convenient when plugable.

 

Regards Terry

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Syd,

You are wasting your money its a HARDWARE PROBLEM not a SOFTWARE PROBLEM. A recovery programme is designed to find files hidden on a WORKABLE Hard Drive, it finds files when the file allocation index table is missing which is how windows would search .

 

All the files are still on the hard Drive but they are invisable to a windows system. From what you have discribed the only way to retreive the data is to make the Drive a Slave as you have tried the most successful way is to make it a secondary hard drive/slave and to re boot the machine until it can be accessed then quickly copy the files across to the new hard drive.

 

It cheaper to post it to us depending on what you wish us to see of course up to you . It does not mean its recoverable but we will certainly let you know if it is.

 

 

;-)

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michele

Many thanks, I will try for a bit longer then if I have no luck I will gladly send it down to you, if you dont mind.

If it gets to the stage where i have to give up should I send it in a external case plus a few discs or what

 

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No just send the Hard Drive well wrapped in bubble.

We are making assumptions but from experience there is a high chance the hard drive is old and it's starting to stick. If he can get it to work he will obviously back up all the information from it.

And once thats done throw the thing away don't ever rely on it again because you will come unstuck.

 

Just out of interest what make is it.

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Hi Michele

 

The hard drive has already been replaced and going from memory I have a feeling that this computer is no more than 18 months old. We run five of them so it is a bit difficult to keep track.

 

The hard drive has the following on it

 

Samsung SP2514N (250GB/7200rpm/8M/PATA)

 

Im still trying your suggestion and will let you know if I have any luck

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Hi Syd

 

This won't help your present problem, but it might prevent it happening again. (As Michelle advises, don't use your old hard drive for anything other than a door stop.)

 

You might want to consider getting a second new one and installing that as a slave hard drive so that you can back up your files just by dragging and dropping. Hard drives are ridiculously cheap now so we are not talking about very much extra cost.

 

Give the "backup" drive a short-cut icon on your desktop, then whenever you want to back up any files you simpy drag and drop them onto the icon, or open the drive and drag them to an appropriate directory if you want to keep things tidy.

 

The chances of your new hard drives going wrong both at once is remote, and it makes backing up so easy that you will be far more likely to do it regularly.

 

Cheers

 

Dave

 

P.S. If you run five machines you could use a local area network (LAN) to back up files from all of them onto the one "spare" hard drive.

 

P.P.S. Sorry if this sounds patronisingly simple - it's not meant to, and might help others who are not very computer-confident.

 

 

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One other suggestion what to do if you need to replace your hard drive, make sure you partition the new one, then you can put the operating system on part 'C', and your files on the other, part 'D'. That way if you every get a probelm with the software, ie such as Microsoft becoming corrupted, you can simply reinstall the software on that part of the hard drive and it won't affect your files. By default Windows (ie the software) always goes on to the 'C' drive (ie the first partition). The only other thing you'll have to do is move 'My Documents' on to the second partition to make sure your documents all definitely save onto the other part.
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michele - 2007-09-15 8:49 PM

 

Did you get it done yet Syd ?..

 

Hi Michele

Never had the time to do anything yet but may get round to it before next Sat or it will have to be in November.

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There is another option.

 

There are several free CD/DVD based Unix operating systems out there. Knoppix comes to mind. You simply insert the disk in the CD drive bay, boot from CD and Knoppix boots up and takes over the PC. Unless you try really hard, no damage will be done to the computer at all, but best of all, your existing hard drives are visible to Knoppix as simple data drives. If you purchase a large portable USB drive, say 160 gig, then this can also be seen as a Knoppix USB drive and hence you can cut and paste the files you want to that USB drive, assuming of course that the original hard drive is readable and not overly damaged.

 

Some notes...

 

Unix: This is definitely not Windows or DOS, but these versions of Unix (e.g. Knoppix) have similar windows environments and apart from looking a little different, and needing to know just a couple of things, it is pretty much just the same as windows... icons, clicks, drag and drop, folders etc.

 

This method of booting up a PC helps in other ways, particularly if for example you have a virus or other file that won't delete in Windows because Windows itself has it open or protected. Booting on a knoppix cd simply presents your drive C and other drives as data drives. It also helps you to learn a far superior operating system should you be interested.

 

The 160 Gig USB drive. These come in all shapes and sizes, and the Western Digital "Passport" drive is one of the few that don't require a separate powerpack for 80 or 160 gig drives. I use it as my primary backup device for all my photos and my 3 laptops. There are lots of smart backup programs out there, but I simply keep all original disks for reloading Windows and other programs, and then regularly connect the USB drive and drag and frop my data directories/folders.

 

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Hi Mom

Thank you,

I will deiinately give that a go but at the moment I am so unusually and unexpectedly busy these last few days that I suspect it will have to wait until November now.

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